School of Public Health Courses

Graduate Course in Health Literacy (Special Problems in Health Education; Health Literacy; Credits: 3) - offered in the Fall

The purpose of this course is to introduce graduate students to health literacy research, practice, and skills. The course will develop students understanding of how health literacy is both a barrier and an asset for health and how health literacy affects a wide range of outcomes. Students will learn the basics of health literacy concepts, models, and research methods, and discuss similarities and differences in health literacy research in clinical and public health settings. Students will study key health topics, populations, and contexts for health literacy research and practice. The course will describe professional skills necessary for effective public health communication practice and provide opportunities to practice the skills. The implications of research for public health practice, policy, and consumer/patient interventions and behavior will be integrated so that public health practitioners and researchers are prepared to address health literacy in their future work.

You can review the syllabus for the course taught Fall 2017.

Independent Studies

An independent study is an opportunity for students to explore and research a topic of personal interest related to health literacy. Please contact the Center for more information.


Non-School of Public Health Courses

Graduate Course in Consumer Health Informatics  (INST728K; Credits: 3) 

In this course, we will investigate the fields of Consumer Health Informatics and Information Behavior, focusing most heavily on their intersection – Consumer Health Information Behavior. We will explore whether, how, and why people seek out and use health information and the types of health information they need and find useful. During the second half of the course, we will focus on the important concept of health justice – an ideal state in which everyone has an adequate and equitable capability to be healthy. We will identify populations that frequently experience social injustice and explore the information-related causes and broader consequences of the health inequities members of these populations tend to face. 

You can review the syllabus for the course taught in Spring 2018.