Program Management Specialist & Graduate Secretary. , Family Science
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health
Phone: 301.405.7574
Professor of the Practice, Health Services Administration
Health Officer, Charles County Department of Health
Campus: Off Campus | Building:

Education and Training

Howard University Hospital and D. C. General Hospital, Washington, DC, Internship and Residency-Pediatrics 1989-1992                           

Tulane University, School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA:  M.D. 1989                                                                

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA: B.S. Biology and Humanities  1983 

 

Honors and Awards

Pediatrician of the Year, Montgomery-Prince Georges Pediatric Society                                         2010

Physician of the Year, the Maryland Academy of Physician Assistants                                            2009

 

Publications: 

Refereed Journal Articles

Jones R, Flaherty E, Price L, Slora E, Abney D, Harris D, Christoffel K, Sege R. Clinicians’ Description of Factors Influencing Their Reporting of Suspected Child Abuse:  Report of the Child Abuse Reporting Experience Study Group. Pediatrics 2008; 122; 259-266.
Flaherty E, Sege R, Griffith J, Price L, Wasserman R, Slora E, Dhepyasunwan N, Harris D, Norton D, Angelilli M, Abney D, Binns H. From Suspicion of Physical Abuse to Reporting:  Primary Care Clinician Decision-Making. Pediatrics 2008; 122; 611-619.Sege R, Flaherty E, Jones R, Price L, Harris D, Slora E, Abney D, Wasserman R.  To report or not report: Examination of the initial primary care management of suspicious childhood injuries.  Academic Pediatrics. 2011;(11):460-466.Lee J, Wasserman R, Kaciroti N, Gebremariam A, Steffes J, Dowshen S, Harris D, Serwint J, Abney D, Smitherman L, Reiter E, Herman-Giddens M. Timing of Puberty in Overweight Versus Obese Boys. Pediatrics. 2016; 137 (2) 1-10.

Business Service Specialist, Office of the Dean
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health
Phone: (301) 405-1912 |
Barbara Albert
Building: School of Public Health
Phone: (301) 405-2164 |
Affiliate Associate Professor, Behavioral and Community Health
Professor, Department of Communication and Associate Dean for Research and Programming, College of Arts and Humanities
Other Affiliations: Horowitz Center for Health Literacy, UMD Prevention Research Center, UMB Epidemiology and Public Health
Campus: UMD | Building: Skinner | Room: 2122
Phone: 301-509-7364 |
Office Hours: 

By appointment, email laldoory@umd.edu

Biography

Dr. Linda Aldoory was Endowed Chair and Director of the Herschel S. Horowitz Center for Health Literacy and Associate Professor in Behavioral & Community Health at the School of Public Health from 2011 to 2015. Her research focuses on health communication, specifically, public health campaigns and message design and their effects on underserved health populations. 

Aldoory is currently part of a funded research project supported through the Health Enterprise Zone grant awarded Prince George’s County Health Department by the State of Maryland. Her role is to conduct community-based participatory research and develop a health literacy campaign for Capitol Heights, MD. Another sponsored research initiative is funded by Atlantic General Hospital and Health System to integrate health communication concepts into common core curriculum in Worcester County Public Schools. Her research is published in top journals, such as Journal of Communication, Journal of Health Communication, Health Communication, Journal of Public Relations Research, and Women & Health

Aldoory serves as member of the Maryland State Health Care Commission's Health Information Exchange Policy Board and the Consumer Engagement Taskforce for the Maryland State Health Services and Cost Review Commission. She is Board Member of Healthcare Access Maryland. She also is member of the Behavioral Health Workgroup of Prince George's County Health and Human Services and the Maryland Women's Coalition for Health Care Reform Advisory Committee.

Aldoory formerly worked in health communication and public relations for The Bronx Perinatal Consortium, a maternal child health organization in The Bronx, NY; Hill & Knowlton Public Relations; the American Psychiatric Association; and the National Alliance for Mental Illness. She continues to consult for such organizations as the U.S. Centers for Disease Prevention and Control, American Health Insurance Plans, and the U.S. Drug Administration.

Education and Training

Ph.D., Mass Communication, Syracuse University, New York, 1999 
M.A., Journalism, University of Texas at Austin, 1991
B.A., Psychology, George Washington University, Washington DC, 1988

Courses

COMM 350: Public Relations Theory 
COMM 351 : Public Relations Techniques
COMM 354: Public Relations Programs 
COMM 370: Mediated Communication
COMM 483: Senior Seminar in Public Relations
COMM 360: Seminar in Public Relations Management
COMM 631: Seminar in Public Relations Publics
COMM 698P: Seminar in Communication: Public Campaigns
COMM 714: Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Communication
COMM 715: Advanced Qualitative Methods in Communication
COMM 730: Seminar in Health Communication
COMM 739P: Topics in Public Relations: Gender and Diversity in PR

Publications: 
  1. Aldoory, L. (2001). Making health communications meaningful for women: Factors that influence involvement and the situational theory of publics.  Journal of Public Relations Research, 13, 163-185.
  2. Aldoory, L., & Bonzo, S. (2005). Using communication theory in injury prevention campaigns. Injury Prevention, 11(5), 260-263.
  3. Aldoory, L., & Van Dyke, M. (2006). The roles of perceived “shared” involvement and information overload in understanding how audiences make meaning of news about bioterrorism. Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, 83(2), 346-361.
  4. Vardeman, J. E., & Aldoory, L. (2008). How women make meaning of their shared involvement with spokespersons in news about bioterrorism. Media Report to Women, 36(2).
  5. Vardeman, J. E., & Aldoory, L. (2008). A qualitative study of how women make meaning of contradictory media messages about the risks of eating fish. Health Communication, 23(3), 282-291.
  6. Aldoory, L., Kim, J. N., & Tindall, N. (2010). The Influence of Perceived Shared Risk in Crisis Communication: Elaborating the Situational Theory of Publics. Public Relations Review, 36(2), 134-140.
  7. Adeleye, O. A., Aldoory, L., & Parakoyi, D. B. (2011). Using Local Culture and Gender Norms to Improve Male Involvement in Maternal Health in Southern Nigeria. Journal of Health Communication, 16(4).
  8. Grunig, J., & Aldoory, L. (2012). The Rise and Fall of Hot-Issue Publics: Relationships that Develop From Media Coverage of Events and Crises. International Journal of Strategic Communication
Building: School of Public Health | Room: 0110N
Phone: (301) 405-2164 |
Biography

Sarah Allard is a postdoctoral fellow for CONSERVE, a Center of Excellence at the Nexus of Sustainable Water Reuse, Food, and Health. Sarah began her research career as an undergraduate, investigating the pollination efficiency and diversity of native bees on watermelon fields in the mid-Atlantic. After receiving her B.A. in Biology from Haverford College in 2009, she began an ORISE fellowship in the Division of Microbiology at the FDA's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. At FDA, she participated in environmental sampling for foodborne pathogens, evaluation of a food safety biological control agent, and optimization of Salmonella detection methods from environmental samples. As a graduate student in Plant Science at the University of Maryland, she studied the influence of farming practices and environmental conditions on the lives of microbes, including foodborne pathogens, in the complex agricultural environment. As part of the CONSERVE team based in the UMD School of Public Health, she is primarily working to characterize the microbiomes of nontraditional irrigation water sources including surface water and reclaimed wastewater. She is passionate about working towards the adoption of agricultural practices that are microbiologically safe, environmentally sustainable, and economically viable.

Education and Training

Ph.D., Plant Science, University of Maryland

B.A., Biology, Haverford College

Publications: 

S. Allard, C. Walsh, A. Wallis, A. Ottesen, E. Brown, S. Micallef (2016). Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) hosts robust phyllosphere and rhizosphere bacterial communities when grown in soil amended with various organic and synthetic fertilizers. Science of the Total Environment 573: 555-563.

R. Bell, J. Zheng, E. Burrows, S. Allard, C. Wang, C. Keys, D. Melka, E. Strain, Y. Luo, M. Allard, S. Rideout, E. Brown (2015). Ecological prevalence, genetic diversity, and epidemiological aspects of Salmonella isolated from tomato agricultural regions of the Virginia Eastern Shore. Frontiers in Microbiology 6(415).

S. Allard, A. Enurah, E. Strain, R. Blodgett, P. Millner, S. Rideout, E. Brown, J. Zheng (2014). In situ evaluation of Paenibacillus alvei in reducing carriage of Salmonella Newport on whole tomato plants. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 80(13): 3842:3849.

Y. Luo, C. Wang, S. Allard, E. Strain, M. Allard, E. Brown, and J. Zheng (2013). Draft Genome Sequences of Paenibacillus alvei. Genome Announcements 1(5): e00673-13.

A. Ottesen, A. Gonzalez, J. White, J. Pettengill, C. Li, S. Allard, S. Rideout, M. Allard, T. Hill, P. Evans, E. Strain, S. Musser, R. Knight, E. Brown (2013). Baseline survey of the anatomical microbial ecology of an important food plant: Solanum lycopersicum (tomato). BMC Microbiology 13(1): 114.

J. Zheng, S. Allard, S. Reynolds, P. Millner, G. Arce, R. Blodgett, E. Brown (2013). Colonization and Internalization of Salmonella enterica in Tomato Plants. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 79: 2494-502.

Research Professor, Kinesiology
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health

Biography

Barbara Alving, M.D. is a research professor in the School of Public Health at the University of Maryland at College Park and Professor of Medicine at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda. Dr. Alving received her undergraduate degree in biology from Purdue University and her M.D. cum laude from the Georgetown University School of Medicine in Washington, D.C. She completed a residency in internal medicine and a research fellowship in hematology at the Johns Hopkins University Hospital in Baltimore, MD, and then became a research investigator at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). From 1980-1996, she continued her research in bleeding and clotting disorders at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, leaving the military at the rank of Colonel. Dr. Alving then served as the Director of the Medical Oncology/Hematology Section at the Washington Hospital Center in Washington, D.C. before joining the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute at NIH, finally serving as Acting Institute Director from 2003 until 2005 and then as the Director of another NIH center from 2005-2011. In 2012 she joined the University of Maryland School of Public Health, where she directed the  undergraduate Public Health Science Program from 2014-2016.

Sania Amr
Professor (Joint Appointment), Applied Environmental Health (MIAEH)
Professor, Dept. of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine
Campus: UMB | Building: HH | Room: 133C
Phone: (410) 706-1466 |
Website: 
University of Maryland School of Medicine faculty profile
Professor and Chair, Family Science
Other Affiliations: UMD Prevention Research Center
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1142Y
Phone: (301) 405-4010 |
Office Hours: 

Contact via email to set up a time to meet unless otherwise listed in the Course Syllabus.

CV / Resume
File AndersonVitaMarch2016.docx
Biography

Dr. Elaine Anderson is Professor and Chair, Department of Family Science, School of Public Health, University of Maryland.  She is also the Co-Director and Founder, Maryland Family Policy Impact Seminar, University of Maryland.

Dr. Anderson is a nationally recognized leader and scholar in the field of family policy, and is a Fellow in the National Council on Family Relations (NCFR) in recognition of enduring contributions to the field of family studies.  She is Past-President of the NCFR (November 2011-November 2013).   She has authored more than 100 publications on such policy topics as homeless families, nonresidential fathers, rural low-income women, welfare reform, deinstitutionalization, Head Start and child care, work policy, and obesity, and presented her work in over 200 invited and refereed presentations nationally and internationally.  Dr. Anderson has been awarded approximately $2.3 million in grants to conduct her research. 

Dr. Anderson has consistently served on multiple editorial boards for the past 25 years and currently is a Member of the Editorial Board, Journal of Family and Economic Issues, published by Human Sciences Press and a Member of the Editorial Board, Family Relations, published by the National Council on Family Relations.  From 2003-2005 she was a National Head Start Fellowship Mentor.  Dr. Anderson has mentored many graduate students and has served on the thesis/dissertation committee of 190 students, of which 20% of these committees she has chaired.  She has been honored by her College at the University of Maryland with all 3 outstanding Mentor, Teacher and Research Awards.

Education and Training

Ph.D., Individual and Family Science, The Pennsylvania State University, 1979.

Courses
  • FMSC 302 Research Methods in Family Science
  • FMSC 452 Family Policy Analysis
  • FMSC 460 Violence in Families
  • FMSC 750 Development and Analysis of Family Policy
  • UNIV 348 Federal Semester: Health Policy
Honors and Awards
  • Awarded Fellow Status for the National Council on Family Relations.
  • Awarded Distinguished Service to SPSSI (Division 9, APA)
  • Author of more than 100 articles and chapters, with publications in such journals as Journal of Marriage and the Family, Family Relations, Journal of Family Issues, and Journal of Family Psychology.
  • Editor of two family policy educational curricula books (1993, 2004).
  • Author of The Reconstruction of Family Policy (1991).
  • Congressional Science Fellow (1985-86); conducted policy analysis/research for the US Senate, the Minnesota and Connecticut State Legislatures, and for two presidential campaigns.
  • Author/co-author of grants totaling over $2.7 million.
  • Participant in University of Maryland Curriculum Transformation Project and Polyseminar for the World's Women: Agenda for Action.
  • Editorial board member currently for the Journal of Family Relations and the Journal of Family and Economic Issues.
  • Vice President for Public Policy of the National Council on Family Relations (1996).
  • Council Member, Division 9 of the American Psychological Association (1994-1998).
  • Outstanding Teacher in School of Public Health (1997).
  • Annual Conference Program Chair of the National Council on Family Relations (2000).
  • Outstanding Research and Development Award, School of Public Health (2003).
  • President-Elect of National Council on Family Relations (2009-2011).
  • President of National Council on Family Relations (2011-2013).
Publications: 

Anderson, E.A. & Leteicq, B.L. (2015).  Family policy through a human rights lens.  In Arditti, J. A. (Ed), Family problems: Stress, risk, and resilience. (pp. 290-304). Malden, MA: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Leteicq, B. A., Anderson, E. A., & Joseph, A. (2012). Social policy and families. In Peterson, G. W. & Bush, K. R. (Eds.), Handbook of marriage and the family (3rd Ed.). New York: Springer Publishing.

Braun, B., Kim, J, & Anderson, E. A. (2009). Family health and financial literacy – Forging the connection. Journal of Family & Consumer Sciences, 101(3), 51-56.

Vesely, C. K. & Anderson, E. A. (2009). Child Care and Development Fund: A thematic policy analysis. Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, 36(1), 39-59.

Simmons, L.A., Anderson, E.A., & Braun B. (2008). Health needs and health care utilization among rural, low-income women.  Women & Health, 47(4), 53-69.

Quach, A. S., & Anderson, E. A. (2008). Implications of China's Open Door Policy for families. Journal of Family Issues, 29(8). 1089-1103.

Liechty, J. M., & Anderson, E. A. (2007). Flexible workplace policies: Lessons from the Federal Alternative Work Schedules Act. Family Relations, 56, 304-317

Anderson, E. A., Kohler, J. K., & Letiecq, B. A. (2005). Predictors of depression among low-income, non-residential fathers. Journal of Family Issues, 26, 547-567.

Anderson, E. A., Braun, B., & Walker, S. K. (2005). Teaching family policy: Advocacy skills education. Journal of Marriage and Family Review, 38, 61-76.

Anderson, E. A., & Letiecq, B. L. (2005). Situating fatherhood in Responsible Fatherhood programs: A place to explore father identity. In W. Marsiglio, K. Roy, & G. L. Fox (Eds.), Situated fathering: A focus on physical and social spaces. Boulder, CO: Rowman & Littlefield.

Kohler, J. K., Anderson, E. A., Oravecz, L., & Braun, B. (2004). Relationship constellations and dynamics of low-income rural mothers. Affilia: Journal of Women and Social Work, 19, 160-173.

Anderson, E. A., Kohler, J. K., & Letiecq, B. A. (2002). Low-income fathers and "Responsible Fatherhood" progams: A qualitative investigation of participants' fathering experiences and perceptions of program efficiency. Family Relations, 51, 148-155. 

Professor, Kinesiology
Other Affiliations: Center for Health Equity
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2357
Phone: (301) 405-2474 |
CV / Resume
PDF icon 2015 CV-Andrews.pdf
Biography

David L. Andrews is a Professor within the Physical Cultural Studies Research Group in the Department of Kinesiology. 

His research critically examines physical culture as a complex empirical assemblage (including, but not restricted to, sport, fitness, exercise, recreation, leisure, wellness, dance, and health-related movement practices).  Informed by various understandings of cultural Marxism, Professor Andrews’ approach considers physical culture as both a product and producer of the cultural, social, political, economic, technological, and environmental dimensions of contemporary society.  Among other foci, he analyzes the complex interconnections linking physical culture with the structures and strictures of late capitalism, related systems of neoliberal governance, and the nature of life within the contemporary metropolis.  The overarching aim of this research is to illuminate the ways that active bodies become organised, disciplined, represented, embodied, and/or experienced in mobilising (or corroborating), or at times immobilising (or resisting), the dominant power relations operating within society that differentiate between the empowered and disempowered, the privileged and under-privileged.

Professor Andrews' publications include: Sport-Commerce-Culture: Essays on Sport in Late Capitalist  America (2006. Peter Lang); The Blackwell companion to sport (edited with Ben Carrington, 2013, Blackwell), and Sport and Neoliberalism: Politics, Consumption, and Culture (edited with Michael Silk, 2012, Temple University Press); and, The Routledge Handbook of Physical Cultural Studies (edited with Michael Silk and Holly Thorpe, forthcoming, Routledge).  He serves as the associate editor of the Journal of Sport and Social Issues, and on the editorial boards/editoral advisory boards of the Sociology of Sport Journal, the International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Communication & Sport, Celebrity Studies, and Leisure Studies.  In addition, he serves as the co-editor (with Stephen Wagg) of the Global Culture and Sport book series (Palgrave Macmillan).

Key Concepts

Physical cultural studies; physical culture and late capitalism; neoliberalism and physical culture; physical culture and the contemporary metropolis; sociology of sport; globalization and sport; cultural studies; contemporary cultural theory; for more information please see UMD Physical Cultural Studies website (http://www.umdpcs.org).

Education and Training

Ph.D. (Sociology of Sport).  Department of Kinesiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, IL.  Awarded: October 1993.

 

M.S. (Sociology of Sport). Department of Kinesiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL.  Awarded: January 1991.

 

B.Ed (Hons.) (Physical Education and History).  College of St. Mark and St. John, Plymouth, England.  Awarded: June 1985.

Courses

KNES 287 Sport and American Society

To some people, sport exists as a realm of popular experience somehow removed or isolated from the forces and pressures that have come to define the rest of society. This course seeks to explode this sporting mythology, by highlighting the extent to which sport is in fact a social construction, which can only be understood in relation to the social forces and relations operating within contemporary America.  As such, this course encourages students to develop a truly sociological sporting imagination, with regard to their perceptions and experiences of the necessary interrelationship between sport culture and the forces, institutions, and processes, structuring contemporary American society.  In doing so, this course focuses on: the relationship between sport and political, economic, and cultural institutions; the effects of commodifying, corporatizing, mass-mediating, and globalizing processes on the structure contemporary sport; the influence contemporary sport culture has on the shaping of particular of class, race, gender, age, and nation-based bodies, identities, and experiences; and, the various collective groupings–subcultural, community, national, and global–through which sport is organized and experienced within contemporary life.

KNES 289Y The [In]Active City: The Physical Cultures of Metropolitan Baltimore

This course critically examines the health and well-being of the contemporary American city, as embodied and expressed in the physical cultures of its citizens. Using Baltimore as the focus of a case study approach, the course identifies and analyzes the individual preferences, collective patterns, and institutional formations of physical activity (including sport, exercise, fitness, wellness, recreation, and movement related practices) evidenced within this illustrative metropolitan American context.  Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach, the course highlights the various factors (social, cultural, political, economic, and geographic) that influence the rates, patterns, and practices of physical activity participation among the diverse communities (socio-economic, racial, and ethnic) inhabiting today's varied city spaces (urban, suburban, and exurban).

These complexly inter-related factors influencing physical (in)activity structures, patterns, and experiences include, but are certainly not restricted to: socio-demographics; communal norms; the built environment; local, federal, and state public policy; park and recreation provision; educational institutions and programming; healthcare delivery; policing and security imperatives; elite/professional sport entities; commercial and corporate concerns; and, the dictates of the broader political economy. In developing a synthetic understanding of [in]active Baltimore, the course encourages the future formulation of formative strategies and policies designed to enhance the physical health and well-being of the contemporary American city, and its constitutive citizenry.

KNES 485 Sport and Globalization

Sport is everywhere and, in the truest sense of the words, it is a vibrant cultural universal. However, while sport involvement (both in terms of participation and spectating) could be said to be a globally ubiquitous practice, sport continues to act as a vehicle for the expression of local (in most cases, national or regional) cultural difference. From Argentina to Zimbabwe, sport plays an important role in forming the experiences and identities of people often living in very differing cultural, political, and economic conditions. So, in a very real sense, sport could be said to be both a global and local phenomenon. This course examines the relationship between local sport cultures and the globalizing forces shaping contemporary existence. This necessarily involves highlighting the extent to which contemporary sport cultures are indeed the result of an interplay between local and global forces. Focusing specifically on a broad range of national contexts (including, but not restricted to, the United Kingdom, Australia, France, Japan, New Zealand, and India), the course identifies—and seeks to explain—patterns of similarity and difference exhibited between national sporting cultures.

The specific aim of the course is to encourage students to consider how various sport practices, bodies, products, and spectacles, operate and are experienced as manifestations of the global-local nexus. So, by examining sport within differing cultural settings, it becomes evident how contemporary sport cultures are influenced by the workings of global economic, political, and cultural forces, while simultaneously seeking to express local conditions and identities.  Such a cross-cultural examination will hopefully nurture, not only a comparative understanding of various national sport cultures, but also a more nuanced and sensitive understanding of the derivation and experience of cultural difference within the era of globalization.

KNES 689B Physical Cultural Studies

This course is an introduction for graduate students–those both within and outside the area–to the developing intellectual project that is Physical Cultural Studies (henceforth, PCS).  It seeks to develop a nuanced understanding of the derivation, theoretical and methodological elements, empirical foci, political-moral imperatives, and future directions of PCS.  Rather than having them imposed upon them, students are encourage to engage the lecture/seminar structure of the course as a dialogic exercise: one that requires their active contribution to the on-going formation of Physical Cultural Studies.  This is realized through an engagement with the following thematics.  PROJECTS - referring to the purpose, aims, prehistory, and conjoined political/moral imperatives of PCS; PRACTICES - examining the various scales, performances, and forms of empirical involvement with, or engagement in, physical culture; POWER - explicating the conjunctural and contingent operations of power, and the enactment of associative subjectivities, within and through physical culture; PRAXIS – analyzing the critical and reflexive interplay between theory, method, and the empirical as the craft of PCS; and, POSSIBILITIES – pointing to the potential futures of a progressive PCS, both as an individual and collective enterprise.  The aim of the course is for graduate students to develop a more informed understanding of the burgeoning PCS project, and to be able to locate themselves, and their current and/or future research endeavors within it.  The broader objective of this course–and the PCS program of which it is a foundational part–is to produce informed and imaginative researchers committed to moving PCS forward through an adherence to the precepts and process of dialogic inquiry.

KNES 613 Theories of Physical Culture

Critically examines the major social and cultural theories that have been utilized in interpreting the structures, practices, and embodiments, and experiences of physical culture. This course introduces, and hopefully develops a nuanced understanding of the contrasting, and sometimes contradictory, social and cultural theories developed by, amongst other theorists, Karl Marx, Antonio Gramsci, Norbert Elias, Pierre Bourdieu, Michel Foucault. These social and cultural theorists are engaged as exemplars of particular theoretical and ontological positions, in order to provide students with a more diverse and flexible array of interpretive positions from which to critically engage, and hopefully better understand, the physical cultural empirical. Much of the course focuses on a detailed exposition and critical analysis of research studies, focused on, that have engaged and utilized these social and cultural theories, in examining various empirical dimensions of physical culture.  Hence, the course is about introducing students to various frameworks for interpreting the empirical complexity and diversity of physical culture. The course is not intended to privilege one theorist/theoretical/ontological position, over another, rather it is hoped students will gain a broad understanding of them all, and develop a specialist interest in the form of theorizing that work most significantly contributes to their own research agenda.   

KNES 614 Cutural Studies and Physical Culture

As its name implies, the Physical Cultural Studies program at the University of Maryland is centrally concerned with forging a critical, theoretically based, and interventionist understanding of the structure, meaning, and experience of various forms of popular physical culture.  However, it should not be overlooked that cultural studies–and particularly the strand of cultural studies emanating from the University of Birmingham’s groundbreaking Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies and subsequently developed within numerous intellectual settings–represents a significant interpretive, philosophical, and political influence on particular understandings of the Physical Cultural Studies project. 

Despite its empirical breadth, cultural studies has consistently recognized the importance of various aspects of physical culture (particularly sport) to the contested experience of everyday life.  Sport has consistently been a feature of cultural studies research, from Richard Hoggart, through John Clarke, Chas Critcher, and Paul Willis, with Stuart Hall even writing the foreword to John Hargreaves’ Sport, Power, and Culture, to the recent special issue of Cultural Studiesß>Critical Methodologies.  Significantly, cultural studies has also been widely mobilized within the critical sport studies/sociology of sport community; there is, indeed, a plausible argument to be made that the cultural studies project is presently being most presciently and incisively furthered by CL Cole, Ben Carrington, Grant Farred, Mary McDonald, Samantha King et al.  This course seeks to uncover the longstanding and fruitful relationship between cultural studies and physical culture/sport.  The broader aim of this excavation is to contribute to the training of critical, theoretically-informed, and interventionist intellectuals who, through their scholarly exploits and sensibilities, will make a significant contribution to the instantiation, elaboration, and dissemination of the Physical Cultural Studies project.  As such, this course will seek to develop a comprehensive understanding of the primary commitments, constituents, and complexities of Cultural Studies.  

Publications: 

Books (Authored)

Andrews, D.L. (2006).   Sport-Commerce-Culture: Essays on Sport in Late Capitalist  America.  New York: Peter Lang

 

Bush, A., Silk, M.L., Andrews, D.L., & Lauder, H. (2013).  Sports Coaching Research: Context, Consequences, and Consciousness.  London: Routledge.

 

Andrews, D.L. (forthcoming).  Über-Sport: Neoliberalizing American Bodies, Spaces, and Psyches.  New York: Palgrave Macmillan.  

 

 

 

Books (Edited)

 

Andrews, D.L. (Ed.). (2001). Michael Jordan Inc.: Corporate sport, media culture, and late modern America. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.

 

Andrews, D.L., & Jackson, S. J. (Eds.). (2001). Sport stars: The cultural politics of sport celebrity. London: Routledge. 

 

Wilcox, R., Andrews, D.L., & Pitter, R. (Eds.) (2003).  Sporting dystopias: The making and meaning of urban sport cultures.  Albany, NY:  State University of New York Press. 

 

Andrews, D.L. (Ed.).  (2004).  Manchester United: A thematic study.  London; Routledge.

 

Jackson, S.J., & Andrews, D.L. (Eds.) (2005).  Sport, culture, and advertising: Identities, commodities, and the politics of representation.  London: Routledge. 

 

Silk, M.L., Andrews, D.L., & Cole, C.L. (Eds). (2005)  Sport and Corporate Nationalisms.  Oxford: Berg Press.  

 

Andrews, D.L., Mason, D., & Silk, M.L. (Eds.).  (2005).  Qualitative methods in sport studies.  Oxford: Berg Press. 

 

Wagg, S., & Andrews, D.L. (2007).  East Meets West: Sport and the Cold War.  London: Routledge. 

 

Andrews, D.L., & Silk, M.L. (Eds.). (2012). Sport and neoliberalism: Politics, Consumption, and Culture.  Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press.

 

Andrews, D.L. & Carrington, B.  (Eds.). (2013).  The Blackwell companion to sport.  Oxford: Blackwell.

 

Andrews, D.L., Silk, M.L., & Thorpe, H.  (Eds.). (in preparation: 2016). The Routledge Handbook of Physical Cultural Studies.  London: Routledge.

 

 

 

Refereed Journal Articles (since 2012)

 

Andrews, D. L., & Mower, R. L. (2012). Spectres of Jordan. Ethnic and Racial Studies, 35(6), 1059-1077. 

 

Jackson, S., & Andrews, D. L. (2012). Olympic celebrity.  Celebrity Studies, 3(3), 263-269.

 

Friedman, M.T., Bustad, J., & Andrews, D.L. (2012).  Feeding the downtown monster (Re)developing Baltimore’s “tourist bubble”.  City, Culture and Society, 3 (3), 209-218. 

 

Andrews, D. L. (2012). Reflections on Communication and Sport: On Celebrity and Race. Communication and Sport, 1(1-2), 151-163.

 

Ma, D., Ji, L., & Andrews, D. L. (2013). Radical Discontinuity: The Ideological Trend of the Chinese Martial Ethos. Journal of Wuhan Institute of Physical Education, 47(4), 17-22.

 

Andrews, D.L., Silk, M.L., Francombe, J. & Bush, A. (2013).  McKinesiology.  Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies, 35, 1-22.

 

Andrews, D.L., Maddox, C., & Silk, M.L..  (2014).  Sport, Glocalization, and the New Indian Middle Class.  International Journal of Cultural Studies, 17 (3), 258-275.

 

Silk, M.S., Francombe, J.M. & Andrews, D.L.  (2014).  Slowing the Social Sciences of Sport: On the Possibilities of Physical Culture.  Sport in Society, 17 (10), 1266–1289.

 

Grainger, A.D, Rick, J.C., Andrews, D.L. (2014). Bound to the nation: Pacific Islands rugby and the IRB's new ‘one-country-for-life’ eligibility rules.  Sport in Society, 17 (7), 977-991.

 

Andrews, D.L., Bustad, J., & Clevenger, S. (2014).  Spectacles of Sporting Otherness and American Imaginings, 1880-1920.  International Journal of the History of Sport.

 

Silk, M., Francombe, J., & Andrews, D.L. (2014). The corporate constitution of national culture: The mythopoeia of 1966. Continuum: Journal of Media and Cultural Studies, 28 (5), 719-735.

 

Jette, S., Bhagat, K., & Andrews, D. L. (2015). Governing the child-citizen: ‘Let's Move!’ as national biopedagogy. Sport, Education and Society, 1-18. 

 

Andrews, D. L. (2015). Assessing the sociology of sport: On the hopes and fears for the sociology of sport in the US. International Review for the Sociology of Sport, 50(4-5), 368-374.

 

Esmonde, K.S., Cooky, C., & Andrews, D.L. (2015).  “It’s Supposed to be About the Love of the Game, Not the Love of Aaron Rodgers’ Eyes”: Towards a Third Wave     Feminist Analysis of Sports.  Sociology of Sport Journal, 32, (1), 22-48.

 

Wiest, A., Andrews, D.L., & Giardina,  (2015).  Training the Body for Healthism: Reifying Vitality In and Through the Clinical Gaze of the Neoliberal Fitness Club.  Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies, 37 (1), 21-40.

 

DeLuca, J., & Andrews, D.L. (accepted for publication).  Exercising Privilege: The Reproduction of the Upper-Middle Class through Swim Club Membership.  Sociological Inquiry.

 

 

Affiliate Professor, UMD Prevention Research Center
Campus: Off Campus | Building:
Phone: 410 706 5145 |
Assistant Professor, Behavioral and Community Health
Campus: UMD | Building: SPH | Room: 1242V
Phone: (301) 405-2029 |
Website: 
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Elizabeth_Aparicio
Office Hours: 

Virtual and in-person meetings available by appointment.

CV / Resume
PDF icon 2017.8 29 CV~Elizabeth Aparicio.pdf
Biography

Dr. Elizabeth Aparicio is a community-based researcher dedicated to improving health equity via three interrelated areas: teenage pregnancy prevention and teen parenting intervention, intergenerational child maltreatment prevention, and early childhood intervention. Her current work is focused on feasibility testing a newly developed teen pregnancy prevention and sexual health program for homeless and at-risk youth (community partner: Waikiki Health) and examining differential outcomes of evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs among juvenile justice-involved and child welfare-involved youth. Dr. Aparicio is a strong advocate for community participation and voice in research, informing the health and social policies and practices that directly affect them. Her scholarly agenda has its foundation in nearly a decade of direct behavioral health practice as a licensed clinical social worker in Maryland and Washington D.C. with trauma-affected children, youth, and families both in foster care and in the general community. She served the community in Montgomery County and Washington D.C. for many years as an early childhood specialist in direct clinical practice and as an early childhood mental health consultant for preschools, daycare centers, home-based daycare programs, and Early Head Start/Head Start. Dr. Aparicio is a graduate of Catholic University of America (B.A. and M.S.W.) and University of Maryland (PhD in Social Work). She completed HRSA/MCHB-funded predoctoral fellowship training in maternal and child health leadership.

Education and Training

PhD University of Maryland School of Social Work

MSW, BA Catholic University of America National Catholic School of Social Service

Publications: 

West, A., Aparicio, E., Berlin, L., & Jones Harden, B. (2017). Home visitors’ perceptions of supplementing Early Head Start with the Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-up Program: Implications for implementation. Infant Mental Health Journal, 38(4), 514-522.

Aparicio, E. M. (2017). “I want to be better than you”: Lived experiences of intergenerational child maltreatment prevention among teenage mothers in and beyond foster care. Child and Family Social Work, 22, 607-616.

Stephens, T. & Aparicio, E. M. (2017). “It’s just broken branches:” Child welfare-affected mothers’ dual experiences of insecurity and striving for resilience in the aftermath of complex trauma and familial substance abuse. Children and Youth Services Review, 37, 248-256.

Aparicio, E. M., Denmark, N., Berlin, L., & Jones Harden, B. (2016). First generation Latina mothers’ experiences of supplementing home-based Early Head Start with the Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-up program. Infant Mental Health Journal, 37(5), 537-548.

Aparicio, E. M., Gioia, D., & Pecukonis, E. V. (2016). “I can get through this and I will get through this”: The unfolding journey of teenage motherhood in and beyond foster care. Qualitative Social Work. Advance online publication.

Aparicio, E. M., Vanidestine, T., Zhou, K., & Pecukonis, E. V. (2016). Teen pregnancy in Latino communities: Young adult perspectives and experiences of sociocultural context. Families in Society, 97(1), 50-57.

Aparicio, E., Pecukonis, E. V., & O’Neale, S. (2015). “The love that I was missing:” Exploring the lived experience of motherhood among teen mothers in foster care. Children and Youth Services Review, 51, 44-54.

Aparicio, E., Pecukonis, E. V., & Carper, K. (2014). Sociocultural factors of teenage pregnancy in Latino communities: Preparing social workers for culturally-responsive practice. Health and Social Work, 39(4), 238-243.

Aquavita, S., Gibbons, M., Aparicio, E., & Pecukonis, E. V. (2014). Student perspectives on interprofessional education: Overcoming barriers and increasing effectiveness of interdisciplinary experiences. Journal of Allied Health, 23(2).

Aparicio, E., Michalopoulos, L. M., & Unick, G. J. (2013). An examination of the psychometric properties of the vicarious trauma scale in a sample of licensed social workers. Health and Social Work, 38(4), 199-206.

Associate Professor, Behavioral and Community Health
Director, Center on Young Adult Health and Development and Director, Office of Planning and Evaluation
Other Affiliations: Center on Young Adult Health and Development, UMD Prevention Research Center, Office of the Dean
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1242Y
Phone: (301) 405-9795 |
Website: 
Center on Young Adult Health and Development
CV / Resume
PDF icon Arria_cv.pdf
Biography

Amelia M. Arria, Ph.D. is currently the Director of the Center on Young Adult Health and Development and the Office of Planning and Evaluation at the University of Maryland School of Public Health and an Associate Professor with the Department of Behavioral and Community Health. Currently, she is the Principal Investigator on the College Life Study, a longitudinal prospective study of health-risk behaviors among college students. Her research focuses on risk and resiliency factors associated with the development of mental health and substance use among adolescents and young adults, as well as the consequences of untreated mental health conditions and substance use. Her most recent area of interest is understanding how these issues can interfere with academic achievement, and what can be done to promote student success. She has also completed studies related to mental health service utilization, predictors of suicidal behavior, and evaluations of addiction treatment. She is currently involved in several efforts to translate research findings for practical purposes, including her leadership role in the Maryland Collaborative to Reduce College Drinking and Related Problems, an initiative that brings together Maryland colleges to address the problem of excessive alcohol consumption and its consequences on their campuses and in their communities. Much of her research has direct relevance to parents, clinicians and policy makers. She has authored more than 150 scientific peer-reviewed publications and is the recipient of numerous grant awards from foundations, and state and federal agencies. She received a B.S. in Human Development from Cornell University, a Ph.D. in Epidemiology from the University of Pittsburgh School of Public Health and completed postdoctoral training at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health.

 

Education and Training

Postdoctoral Fellow, Epidemiology of Psychiatric Disorders and Drug Dependence, Department of Mental Hygiene, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

PhD, Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, PA

BS, Human Development and Family Studies, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Courses

HLTH 200

HLTH 352

HLTH 776

Honors and Awards

Research Fellowships

Postdoctoral Fellowship, National Research Service Award (Institutional), National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), 1995-1996

Postdoctoral Fellowship, National Research Service Award (Institutional), National Institute on Mental Health (NIMH), 1993-1995

Predoctoral Fellowship, National Service Award (Institutional), National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), 1987-1991

Research Awards

The Visionary Award: For Outstanding Contributions to Youth Recovery Research through the Use of Applied Sciences, Association of Recovery Schools, 2016

Fellow Award, Mary Christie Foundation, 2016

Research Leader, University of Maryland College Park, 2003-2016

Teaching Awards

Nominee, University of Maryland's Graduate Faculty Mentor of the Year, 2016

Most Valuable Professor (MVP), Women’s Field Hockey Team, 2014

Publications: 

Please see the CYAHD Publications Page.

Faculty Research Assistant, Behavioral and Community Health
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1242
Phone: (301) 405-3054 |
Business Coordinator, Kinesiology
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health

Post Award/Finance Coordinator, Office of the Dean
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2242CC
Phone: (301) 405-4516 |
Faculty Assistant, Behavioral and Community Health
Faculty Assistant: Office of Planning and Evaluation, Center on Young Adult Health and Development
Other Affiliations: Center on Young Adult Health and Development, Office of the Dean
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: Center on Young Adult Health and Development, SPH 1242FF
Phone: 301-405-9757 |
Website: 
Center on Young Adult Health and Development
Publications: 

Please see the CYAHD Publications Page.

Building: School of Public Health

Assistant Clinical Professor, Family Science
Building: School of Public Health | Room: 0142
Phone: 301 405 4017 |
CV / Resume
Microsoft Office document icon Resume- Patricia Barros.doc
Biography

Dr. Patricia Barros is an Assistant Clinical Professor in Family Science and Director of the Center for Healthy Families. Prior to coming to the University of Maryland in 2016, she was a postdoctoral clinical fellow at George Washington University. She is an AAMFT Approved Supervisor. She received her B.S. in Psychology from Universidade Catolica de Pernambuco, in Brazil; she earned an M.S. in Psychology, a Master’s and Doctoral degrees in Marriage and Family Therapy, from Kansas State University.  She has worked in multiple settings, including school, home-based, and community health clinics, with a variety of populations and presenting problems. She sees the importance of self-of- the-therapist work as part of providing culturally sensitive services. Her research interests are around factors related to intimate partner violence, as well as on individual and family resiliency. She is particularly interested on life transitions, and how multiple systems can facilitate the growth of culturally minority families and individuals, throughout the life-span.

Education and Training

B.S. Universidade Catolica de Pernambuco, Psychology, 2005
M.S. Kansas State University, Psychology, 2010
M.S. Kansas State University, Marriage and Family Therapy, 2012

Ph.D. Kansas State Uniersity, Marriage and Family Therapy, 2015

Professor (Joint Appointment), Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Professor, Dept. of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine
Campus: UMB | Building: 660 W. Redwood St. 212
Phone: (410)706-1531 |
Website: 
University of Maryland School of Medicine profile
Endowed Professor and Director, Horowitz Center for Health Literacy
Other Affiliations: Behavioral and Community Health
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health
Phone: (301) 405-0388 |
Biography

Dr. Cynthia Baur became the Director of the Horowitz Center for Health Literacy in January 2017. Prior to coming to UMD, Dr. Baur worked for 17 years in communication leadership roles with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) in Washington, D.C. Most recently, she served as the Senior Advisor for Health Literacy in the CDC Office of the Associate Director for Communication and CDC's Senior Official for the Plain Writing Act implementation. During her federal tenure, she led multiple initiatives to define best practices and guidelines in health communication and health literacy. She was the first manager of the Healthy People health communication objectives and the editor of the U.S. National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy. At CDC, she created CDC’s health literacy website, which provides tools and online training to improve health literacy and public health, and she is the co-creator of the CDC Clear Communication Index, a set of scientific criteria for creating clear public communication materials. Her approach is based in communication science and focuses on providing diverse audiences with information in ways they can understand and use.

Education and Training

Ph.D. in Communication, Department of Communication, University of California, San Diego. September, 1995

M.A. in Communication, Department of Communication, University of California, San Diego. December, 1992

B.A. in Rhetoric, Department of Rhetoric, University of California, Davis. June 1983

Honors and Awards

Health Literacy Hero 2015, Institute for Healthcare Advancement. Given for championing health literacy and advocating for its inclusion in the national healthcare dialogue.

Cecilia and Leonard Doak Health Literacy Champion Award 2013. Given by Health Literacy Missouri, St. Louis, Missouri in recognition of national leadership in health literacy.

McGovern Award 2013. Given by the American Medical Writers Association in recognition of leadership in the areas of health communication, health literacy, and risk communication.

Publications: 

Parmer J, Baur C, Eroglu E, Lubell K, Prue C, Reynolds B, and Weaver J. (2016). Crisis and emergency risk messaging in mass media news stories: Is the public getting the information they need to protect their health? Health Communication, doi: 10.1080/10410236.2015.1049728. Baur C and Deering MJ. (2015). Digital Health Technologies for Consumers, Patients, and Caregivers. In Ethical Health Informatics: Challenges and Opportunities, 3rd Ed. Harman LB and Cornelius F (Eds.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett. Deering MJ and Baur C. (2015). Patient portals can enable provider-patient collaboration and person-centered care. In Information Technology for Patient Empowerment in Healthcare, Grando MA, Rozenblum R, and Bates DW (Eds). (pp. 93-111). Boston: Walter de Gruyter Inc. Parmer J and Baur C. (2015). How CDC is promoting a clear communication culture. Medical Writing 24(1):9-13. Baur C and Prue C. (2014). The CDC Clear Communication Index Is a New Evidence-Based Tool to Prepare and Review Health Information. Health Promotion Practice web first. doi: 10.1177/1524839914538969. Robinson MN, Tansil KA, Elder RW, Soler RE, Labre MP, Mercer SL, Eroglu D, et al. (2014). Mass media health communication campaigns combined with health-related product distribution: A Community Guide systematic review. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 47(3):360-371. Baur C and Brach C. (2013). Pharmacy Research on Health Literacy Can Contribute to National Goals and Health Care System Improvements. Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy 9(5):498-502. Koh HK, Baur C, Brach C, Harris LM, Rowden JN. (2013). Toward a Systems Approach to Health Literacy Research. Journal of Health Communication 18:1-5. Koh HK, Berwick DM, Clancy CM, Baur C, Brach C, Harris LM, and Zerhusen EG. (2012). New federal policy initiatives to boost health literacy can help the nation move beyond the cycle of costly “crisis care.” Health Affairs web first. doi:10.1377/hlthaff.2011.1169 Baur C. (2012). Health Information Technology Policy Issues: Relevance and Implications for ehealth Applications. In eHealth Applications: Promising Strategies for Behavior Change, Noar SM and Harrington NG (Eds). (pp. 246-262). New York: Routledge. Brach C, Keller D, Hernandez LM, Baur C, Parker R, Dreyer B, Schyve P, Lemerise AJ, Schillinger D. (2012, June). Ten Attributes of Health Literate Health Care Organizations. Institute of Medicine Discussion Paper. Washington, DC: Institute of Medicine. Brach C, Dreyer B, Schyve P, Hernandez LM, Baur C, Lemerise AJ, Parker R. (2012, January). Attributes of a Health Literate Organization. Institute of Medicine Discussion Paper. Washington, DC: Institute of Medicine. Baur C. (2011). Calling the nation to act: Implementing the national action plan to improve health literacy. Nursing Outlook 59(2):63-69. Baur C & Ostrove N. (2011). Testing rules of thumb and the science of health literacy. Annals of Internal Medicine 155(2):129-130. Baur C. (2011). Calling the nation to act: Implementing the national action plan to improve health literacy. Nursing Outlook 59(2):63-69. Baur C & Ostrove N. (2011). Testing rules of thumb and the science of health literacy. Annals of Internal Medicine 155(2):129-130. Johnson SE, Baur C, Meissner HI. (2011). Back to basics: Why basic research is needed to create effective health literacy interventions. Journal of Health Communication 16(sup3):22-29. Baur C. (2010). New Directions in Research on Public Health and Health Literacy. Journal of Health Communication 15(sup2):42-50. National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy. (2010) Baur C (ed.). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Improving Health Literacy for Older Adults - Expert Panel Report. (2009). Baur C (Ed.). Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Communicating Health: Priorities and Strategies for Progress. Healthy People 2010 Health Communication Action Plans. (2003). Baur C (Ed). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2366
Phone: (301) 405-2527 |
Office Hours: 

Tuesday 11:00 – 12:00 & 2:00 – 4:00 Thursday 11:00 – 12:00 & 2:00 – 3:30

CV / Resume
PDF icon VITA Beck.pdf
Biography

Dr. Beck’s interests include the determinants of threat perception and risk-taking, including alcohol misuse and traffic injury prevention. His research has dealt with adolescents, parents, as well as multiple alcohol offenders.  He conducted the first randomized trial of alcohol ignition interlocks. His research helped form Maryland’s Motor Vehicle Administration policy concerning how DUI offenders are reinstated for licensure. He has also investigated the social contexts of drinking among adolescents and young adults and helped define a consistent relationship between a unique set of social and motivational factors (contexts) of drinking and different patterns of alcohol abuse.  He has worked with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the Maryland Highway Safety Office to evaluate their current drunk driving prevention campaign entitled “Checkpoint Strikeforce.”  He has also collaborated with the Prevention Research Branch of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development on parent-adolescent health research.  His research has been funded by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, the Maryland Department of Transportation, and the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety.  He has published widely in health and safety journals and made numerous presentations nationally and internationally.

Education and Training

Pennsylvania State University, B.S. 05/72 Psychology

Syracuse University, M.A. 05/75 Social Psychology

Syracuse University, Ph.D. 05/77 Social Psychology

University of Connecticut Health Science Center Postdoctoral, 08/79 Health Behavior

Courses

HLTH 106          “Drug Use and Abuse”

HLTH 230          “Health Behavior”

HLTH 371          “Communicating Safety and Health”

HLTH 710          “Methods and Techniques of Research”

HLTH 688D       “Advanced Topics in Impaired Driving Research”

HLTH 775          “Health Education Program Planning and Evaluation” 

Honors and Awards

2011     Beck-Feldman Research Award, created to honor outstanding department undergraduate researchers in recognition of the  research careers of Drs. Beck and Feldman. 

2009     AAHB Conference Outstanding Research Poster

2005     Maryland Highway Safety Office, Impaired Driving Award

2003     Who’s Who in Health Science Education

2000     Elected Fellow, the American Academy of Health Behavior         

1995     Elected Member, the International Council on Alcohol, Drugs and Traffic Safety

Publications: 

Publications

(Last 5 Years)

Lee, C.J., Geiger-Brown, J. & Beck, K.H. (2016). Intention and willingness to drive drowsy among university students: An application of an extended  theory of planned behavior model. Accident Analysis & Prevention, 93, 113-123.

Beck, K.H. & Watters, S. (2016).  Characteristics of college students who text while driving: Do perceptions of a significant other influence their decisions?  Transportation Research Part F , 37, 119-128.  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.trf2015.12.017.

Watters, S.E. & Beck, K.H. (2016).  A Qualitative study of college students’ perceptions of risky driving and social influences.  Traffic Injury Prevention, 17 (2), 122-127..

Beck, K.H., Kelley-Baker, T. & Voas, R.B.  (2015). DUI offenders’ experience with an ignition interlock program: Comparing those who have and have not adapted from their primary drinking location.  Traffic Injury Prevention, 16 (4), 329-335.

Beck, K.H., Ali, B. & Daughters, S.B. (2014). Distress tolerance as a predictor of risky and aggressive driving. Traffic  Injury Prevention, 15, 349-354.

Yao, J., Johnson, M.B. & Beck, K.H.  (2014). Predicting DUI decisions in different legal environments: Investigating deterrence with a conjoint experiment. Traffic  Injury Prevention, 15, 213-221.  

Ali, B., Ryan, J.S., Beck, K.H., & Daughters, S.B. (2013).  Trait aggression and problematic alcohol use: The moderating effect of distress tolerance. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 37(12), 2138-2144.

Bozzolo, C., Beck, KH, Wang, MQ. (2013).  Exploratory study of the burden of nonurgent visits to the emergency department of a hospital in Washington, DC.  American Journal of Health Studies, 28, 50 – 60.

Sharma, E., Beck, KH., & Clark, P.I. (2013).  Social context of smoking hookah among college students: Scale development and validation. The Journal of American College Health, 61, 204-211.

Beck, K.H., Daughters, S.B, & Ali, B. (2013).  Hurried driving: Relationship to distress tolerance, driver anger, aggressive and risky driving in college students. Accident Analysis & Prevention. 51, 51-55.

Beck, K.H., Ahmed, A.U. & Farkas, Z.A. (2013)  Characteristics of DUI offenders with a high versus low perceived risk of arrest. Traffic Injury Prevention, 14, 1-6.

Beck, K.H., Caldeira, K.M, Vincent, K.B. & Arria, A.M. (2013).  Social contexts of drinking and subsequent alcohol use disorder among college students. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, 39 (1), 38-43.

Rath, J.M., Sharma, E., & Beck, K.H. (2013).  Establishing reliability and validity of the Glover-Nilsson Smoking Behavioral Questionnaire.  American Journal of Health Behavior, 37 (3), 310-317.

Beck, K.H, Gianni, T.J. (2012). Training the future leaders in DUI enforcement: the University of Maryland’s DUI Institute.  The Police Chief, May, 68 – 69.

Beck, K.H., Wang, M.Q., & Yan, A.F. (2012).  Hurried driver dispositions: Their relationship to risky traffic behaviors.  American Journal of Health Behavior, 36 (1), 86-95.

Yan, F., Voorhees, C.C., Zhang, G., Beck, K.H., Huang, S. & Wei, H. (2011).  A  Multilevel Investigation on the socio-demographic and urban neighborhood effects on out of school physical activity among inner city minority adolescents.  American Journal of Health Studies, 26 (3), 121-

  130.

Debnam, K, & Beck, K.H.  (2011).  Driving while Black: A comparison of the beliefs, concerns and behaviors of White and Black Maryland drivers. Traffic Injury Prevention, 12 (6), 599-603.

Beck, K.H., Ahmed, A., & Farkas, Z.A. (2011). A descriptive analysis of the social context of drinking among first-time DUI offenders. Traffic Injury Prevention, 12 (4), 306-311.

Thesis/MPH Projects Chaired

(last 5 years)

Gleason, J. (2016). Exploring health in military families: Does continuity of care influence patient satisfaction?  Masters of Public Health Thesis.

Perper, E. (2015). A descriptive study of program implementation among a group of high achieving coalitions in the Drug-Free Communities program.  Masters of Public Health Thesis.

Brooks, A. T. (2015). Sleep throughout the alcoholism recovery process: A mixed-methods examination of individuals' experiences transitioning from an inpatient research facility providing rehabilitation treatment to the community. Doctoral Dissertation.

Lee, C. (2014). Intention and willingness to drive while drowsy in a population of university students in Maryland:  Application of an extended theory of planned behavior model.  Masters of Public Health Thesis.

Breitenother, L.  (2013). Online version of advanced studies in impaired driving.  Masters of Public Health Project.

Matsuo, G. (2013).  What Maryland dentists know and do about preventing dental caries.  Masters of Public Health Thesis.

Aluko, T. (2012).  Medical Students’ Beliefs Towards Screening For Intimate Partner Violence: A Qualitative Study.  Masters of Public Health Thesis.

DeRidder, A. (2011). A web-based ergonomic program for medical students to prevent cumulative trauma disorders.  Masters of Public Health Project.

Lecturer, Kinesiology
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2361
Phone: (301) 405-8265 |
Biography

Adam is a member of the PCS Research Group in the Department of Kinesiology. His research agenda advances the critical and theoretical study of sport and physical culture, with particular regard to the complex relationship between sport and the various facets (social, cultural, political, economic, and technological) of early twenty-first century life. Adam’s areas of focus include: development economics of sport; sport for social development and peace; international development of sport; sport governance and public policy; sport sociology; physical cultural studies; the cultural and political economies of sport and the active body; sport, health, and equitable development; & qualitative research methods for sport and physical culture.

Through his scholarship, Adam advances a dialectic understanding of the relationship between sport and society, resting unequivocally on the notion of popular sporting phenomena (events, institutions, bodies, identities, and experiences) as both constituted and constituting elements of the broader social formation in which they are located. Utilizing a variety of qualitative research methods (i.e. textual and discourse analysis, media analysis, ethnographic fieldwork, and semi-structured interviewing), the broad aim of his research is to illuminate precisely how, why, and to what effect, sporting bodies become organized, regulated, represented, and experienced in the service of contemporaneous power formations and relations (oftentimes prefigured on particular ability, social class, ethnic, gender, generational, national, racial, and/or sexual hierarchies and inequities). The broad aim of his work is to illuminate precisely how, why, and to what effect, sport becomes managed and organized in the service of wider social, economic, and international development goals, and to promote equitable development and social change. 

Adam recently completed his Doctorate of Philosophy in Sport and Leisure Studies from the University of Otago in New Zealand wherein he critically interrogates the contemporary sporting phenomenon of expert Samoan football players, and their overrepresentation in the National Football League (NFL). Based on nearly a year of ethnographic fieldwork, semi-structured interviews, and textual/discourse analysis from the distant shores American Samoa, he develops a theory of the corporeal economy of American Samoan football in which the active Samoan footballing body is triangulated at the broad intersection of the dialectic interplay(s) between biopolitical, geopolitical, and cultural political structures, discourses, and formations of power that influence upon on how the body is:

1) produced on the field through regimes of discipline and technologies of power (the kinesthetic body)
2) becomes economically and socially mobile through exchanges in global athletic labor markets (the laboring body)
3) is understood in the making of the self and a expressions of identity, citizenship, and cultural belonging (the mediated body)

In the process, Adam provides a more complicated, nuanced, and interdisciplinary rejoinder to the question of the phenomenon of American Samoan gridiron football, and in a broader sense, a more complex, critical, and experiential study of the of the interactions and interrelationship between the biological, the cultural, and the economic in the development of athletic talent expertise.

Even more recently, Adam's teaching and scholarship is interested in sport for equitable development, with three primary stands of ongoing research and scholarship focusing on: (1) sport for social development and peace; (2) development economics of sport and (3) sport for international development. These ongoing research projects investigate the social, economic, and political machinations of cutting sports programming at intercollegiate athletic institutions; explore the economic impact of mixed-use development logics guiding baseball stadium construction; examine the technologies of power and disciplinarity in the realm of sports coaching; and most recently, have focused on developing a typology of praxis for sport for development and peace programs. 

Education and Training

2009-2015, Doctor of Philosophy, Sport and Leisure Studies, School of Physical Education, Sport, and Exercise Science, University of Otago

      Dissertation Title: Sons of Samoa: The Corporeal Economy of American Samoa Gridiron Football
      Program/Dissertation Supervisor(s): Dr. Steven J. Jackson & Dr. Joshua I. Newman (Florida State
      University)

2007-2009, Master of Business Administration (Sport Management Specialization), University of Baltimore/Towson University

2003-2007, Bachelor of Science (with honors), Sport Management, Department of Kinesiology, Towson University

Courses

            Undergraduate:

            KNES 287: Sport in American Society (3 credits)

            KNES 342: Sport, Commerce, and Culture in the Global Marketplace – New Zealand Study Abroad Program
          
(3 credits - winter)

           KNES 342: Sport, Commerce, and Culture in the Global Marketplace – London, Berlin, & Barcelona Study 
           
Abroad Program (3 credits - summer)

            KNES 389i: Sport Economics (3 credits)

            KNES 389d: Sport for Development (3 credits)

            KNES 485: Sport Globalization (3 credits)

           KNES 497: Senior Seminar – Qualitative Research for Sport and Physical Culture (3 credits)

           KNES 497: Senior Seminar – Critical Analysis of the Sport Industry (3 credits)

          Graduate: 

           KNES 689k - Qualiative Research Methods for Sport and Physical Culture (3 credits)

Honors and Awards

2015-2016 Doris W. Sands Award for Teaching Excellence; awarded annually to one member of the School of Public Health for consistent excellence and effectiveness in teaching.

Publications: 

Book Manuscripts

Andrews, D.L. & Beissel, A.S. (In Process, 2017). Sport and Physical Culture in American Society. Book proposal prepared for Oxford University Press: London.

 

Book Chapters:

Beissel, A.S. (In Press, 2015). Confessions of a human trafficker: Inside the global recruitment system(s) and network(s) of international student-athletes in NCAA football. In King-White, R.W. (Ed.). Sport in the Neoliberal University: Profit, Politics, and Pedagogy. Rutgers University Press.

Friedman, M.F. & Beissel, A.S. (In review, 2016). Supercharging the Mallpark: The Battery, Atlanta, and the Future of Baseball Stadium Development. In Friedman, M.F. The Mallpark: Consuming cathedrals of Consumption: TBD.

Beissel, A.S., Giardina, M., & Newman, J.I (2015) Men of Steel: Social class, masculinity, and cultural citizenship in post-industrial Pittsburgh. In Guschwan, M. (Ed.). Sport and Citizenship. New York: Routledge.

Jackson, S.J., Sam, M., Gee, S., Scherer, J. & Beissel, A.S. (2012). Sport Mega-Events Between the Global & the Local: Lessons from the 2011 Rugby World Cup. In Ramon Llopis-Goig (Ed.) Sport mega-events: Scientific perspectives and case studies. Barcelona: Editorial UOC.

Beissel, A.S., Newman, J.I., & Giardina, M.D. (2011). NASCAR Nation as/in Petrol Empire. In Newman, J.I. & Giardina, M.D. (2011). Sport, Spectacle, and NASCAR Nation: Consumption and the Cultural Politics of Neoliberalism. New York: PalgraveMacMillan.

Newman, J.I., Giardina, M.D. & Beissel, A.S. (2011). ‘Selling Out’ NASCAR Nation. In Newman, J.I., & Giardina, M.D. (2011). Sport, Spectacle, and NASCAR Nation: Consumption and the Cultural Politics of Neoliberalism. New York: PalgraveMacMillan.

 

Refereed Publications

Beissel, A.S. (In Process, 2016). Gridiron Football in American Samoa: Migration, Labor Flows, and the American Samoan MIRAB Economy. International Review for the Society of Sport.

Beissel, A.S. (In Process, 2016). The Bio-politics of Sport Coaching: Disciplinary Technologies, Corrective Training, and the Production of Docile Bodies. International Sport Coaching Journal (USA).

Beissel, A.S., King-White, R.W., & Newman, J.I. (In Process, 2016). Follow the Money: Accrual accounting, the cutting of college sports programs, and the fuzzy math of NCAA Athletic departments. Journal of Sport and Social Issues.

Friedman, M.F. & Beissel, A.S. (Forthcoming, 2016). Supercharging the Mallpark: The Battery, Atlanta, and the Future of Baseball Stadium Development. Urban Studies.

King-White, R.W., Newman, J.I. & Beissel, A.S. (In Review, 2015). Stakeholder Becomings: An Interdisciplinary, Multi-Method Study of Organizational Politics and (De)Democratic Decision-Making in Intercollegiate Stadium Financing. Journal of Issues in Intercollegiate Athletics.

Beissel, A.S. (2013). Book Review. Sport Management – Principles and Applications 3rd Ed. Hoye, R., Smith, A.C.T., Nicholson, M., Stewart, B., & Westerbeek, H. Routledge, UK. For Sport Management Review. 16(4): 533-534.

Beissel, A.S., Giardina, M., & Newman, J.I (2013) Men of Steel: Social class, masculinity, and cultural citizenship in post-industrial Pittsburgh. Sport in Society. July. Routledge, p. 1-24.

Beissel, A.S (2011). Book Review. Introduction to Sport Management: Theory and Practice. By Nagel, M. & Southall, R. (Eds.). (2010). Iowa: Kendall Hunt Publishing. For Sport Management Review, 14: 465-466.

Newman, J.I., & Beissel, A.S. (2009). The limits to ‘NASCAR Nation’: Sport and the ‘recovery movement’ in disjunctural times. Sociology of Sport Journal, 26(4), 517-539.

Braunstein, J.R., Newman, J.I., & Beissel, A.S. (2008). Inside BAM Racing: Rethinking the sponsorship match-up process in ‘America’s fastest-growing sport’. International Journal of Sports Marketing & Sponsorship, 9(3), 219-233.

 

Refereed Presentations

Friedman, M.F. & Beissel, A.S. (2016). Supercharging the Mallpark: The Battery, Atlanta, and the Future of Baseball Stadium Development. Paper presented at the North American Society for Sport Management (NASSM) 2016 Conference, Orlando, Florida, United States, June.

Friedman, M.F. & Beissel, A.S. (2016). Supercharging the Mallpark: The Battery, Atlanta, and the Future of Baseball Stadium Development. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of Association of American Geographers, San Francisco, California, United States, March.

King-White, R., & Beissel, A.S. (2015). Show me the Money: Student Fees and the Myth of Athletics as a Drain on the University. Paper presented at the Annual Conference for the North American Society for the Sociology of Sport, Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States, November.

Friedman, M.F., & Beissel, A.S. (2014). A Real Estate Deal Masquerading as a Stadium Agreement: The Atlanta Braves Move to Cobb County and the Future of Stadium Development. Paper presented at the Annual Conference for the North American Society for the Sociology of Sport, Portland, Oregon, United States, October.

King-White, R., Newman, J.I., Beissel, A.S., Deluca, J.R., & Friedman, M.F. (2014). Stakeholder Becomings: An Interdisciplinary, Multi-Method Study of Organizational Politics and (De-)Democratic Decision-Making in Intercollegiate Stadium Financing. 60-minute Symposium Roundtable Discussion at North American Society for Sport Management Annual Conference (NAASM), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States, May.

Beissel, A.S. (2012). Men of Steel. Social Class, Masculinity, and Cultural Citizenship in Post-Industrial Pittsburgh. Paper presented at the Annual Conference for the North American Society for the Sociology of Sport, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States, November.

Beissel, A.S. (2011). Reducing the Samoan Body: Articulating Scientific Racism and Neoliberal Sport. Paper presented at the International Sociology of Sport World Congress 2011, Havana, Cuba, July.

Beissel, A.S. (2009). Brought to you by Waitangi TV: The cultural politics of the Rugby World Cup Broadcast Rights. Paper presented at the First Annual Postgraduate Student Symposium, School of Physical Education, University of Otago, New Zealand, November.

Beissel, A.S., & Newman, J.I. (2008). Manufacturing America: Post-Industrialism and the Militarized Stock Car Spectacle. Paper presented at the Annual Conference for the North American Society for the Sociology of Sport, Denver, Colorado, United States, November.

Beissel, A.S. (2008). NASCAR of Tomorrow: NASCAR, Milton Friedman, and the Politics of Falling Empire.  Paper presented at the 1st Annual University of Maryland Physical Cultural Studies Student Conference, College Park, Maryland, United States, April.

Braunstein, J., Newman, J. I., & Beissel, A.S. (2007). NASCAR: A Preliminary Exploration of the Sponsorship Match-up Process. Paper presented at the Annual Conference for the North American Society for Sport Management, Miami, Florida, United States, May.

 

Invited Presentations

Beissel, A.S. (2015). Global Trojan Horses and Sporting White Elephants. Paper presented at Neumann College Sport, Sales, and Sponsorship Research Seminar, Neumann College, Aston, Pennsylvania, October.

Beissel, A.S. (2015). Sons of Samoa: The Corporeal Economy of American Samoa Gridiron Football. Paper presented at the Department of Kinesiology Faculty Research and Teaching Seminar, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, United States, May.

Beissel, A.S. (2015). Invited speaker at 60-minute Roundtable Discussion on Careers in the Sport Industry at 2nd Annual Towson Sport Management Symposium, Towson, Maryland, United States, April.

Beissel, A.S. (2012). Portraits from Tutuilla: Practice and Parallax in Physical Cultural Studies. Paper Presented at a public Symposium: Sport and National Identity in a Global World, Georgetown University, Washington D.C., United States, November 30.

Beissel, A.S. (2011). Postcards from Tutuila: Reflections of the Ethnographic Self. Paper presented at the Third Annual Postgraduate Student Research Symposium, School of Physical Education, University of Otago, New Zealand, November.

Beissel, A.S. (2009). Ethnographic Tales from ‘NASCAR Nation’. Presentation given for Research Design and Analysis Course, School of Physical Education, University of Otago, New Zealand, October. 

Professor Emeritus, Family Science
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1142 School of Public Health

Office Hours: 

Contact via email to set up a time unless otherwise listed in Course Syllabus.

Education and Training

Ph.D., Social Policy and Social Research, Florence Heller School of Brandeis University, 1964

Honors and Awards
  • Author of seven books, including: The Black Church and Social Reform (1999); Climbing Jacob's Ladder (1992); Black Families in White America (1968, 1988); The Evolution of the Black Family(1974); Children of the Storm: Black Children in American Child Welfare (1971).
  • Author of three major grants totaling $700,000 from the Ford Foundation and the Lilly Endowment.
  • Recipient of numerous professional awards including: Community Leadership Award (1988) from the National Council of Negro Women; Marie Peters Award from the National Council on Family Relations (1989); DuBois, Johnson, Frazier Award from the American Sociological Association (1992); Distinguished Scholar Award (1991) and Pioneer Sociologist Award (1993) from the Association of Black Sociologists.
  • Co-chair of Task Force on Children of the National Black Leadership Commission on AIDS; Advisory Board Member of the National Parenting Association, the National Institute of Responsible Fatherhood, and the Program Center of the National Council of Negro Women.
  • President and Professor of Sociology, Morgan State University, Baltimore, Maryland.
  • Vice President for Academic Affairs, Howard University, Washington, D.C.
Publications: 

Billingsley, A. (1999). Mighty like a river: The Black church and social reform. New York: Oxford University Press.

Billingsley, A. (1998). "Introduction" to Robert B. Hill: The strengths of African American families: Twenty five years later. Washington, DC: R & B Publishing.

Rubin, R. H., Billingsley, A., & Caldwell, C. H. (1995). The Black church and youth-at-risk for incarceration.Monograph on Youth in the 1990s, 4, 61-74.

Billingsley, A., & Caldwell, C. H. (1994). The social relevance of the contemporary Black church. National Journal of Sociology, 8(1-2), 1-24. Billingsley, A. (1992). Climbing Jacob's ladder: The enduring legacy of African American families. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Billingsley, A. (1988). Black families in White America. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Affiliate Faculty, UMD Prevention Research Center
Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine
Campus: UMB | Building: | Room: UMD School of Medicine

Website: 
University of Maryland School of Medicine profile
Director of Communications, Office of the Dean
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2242L
Phone: (301) 405-9418 |

As director of communications, Kelly leads marketing and communications efforts to increase the visibility of the School of Public Health and to demonstrate the impact of the school’s research, education and service activities in advancing public health in Maryland and beyond.

She serves as the school's liaison to University Marketing and Communications and to the news media to provide timely information and expertise on public health topics and initiatives. Kelly has served in communications positions with the University of Maryland since 2005, and with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health from 2002-2005. She is an alumna of the College of Arts and Humanities (BA in English,'94) and has a Master of Arts in Publications Design from the University of Baltimore.

She currently lives in Columbia, Maryland with her husband Alfredo and daughter Lucia.

Professor, Behavioral and Community Health
Director, Prevention Research Center
Other Affiliations: UMD Prevention Research Center
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2360
Phone: (301) 405-8546 |
CV / Resume
PDF icon BradleyBoekelooCV
Education and Training

Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University, School of Hygiene and Public Health, Department of Health Policy and Management, Division of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Baltimore, MD. Dissertation: "Evaluation of Strategies for Increasing Intern Cholesterol Management Practice in In-Patients", 1988.

Sc.M., The Johns Hopkins University, School of Hygiene and Public Health, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Baltimore, MD. Thesis: "Analysis of the Bortner Type A Scale and Type A Behavior in Adol¬escence", 1984.

M.S. candidate, The University of Massachusetts at Amherst, School of Health Sciences, Department of Health Education, 1981-82.

B.A., Kalamazoo College, Department of Biology, Kalamazoo, MI. Thesis: "A Disease Surveillance Study of Giardiasis in Michigan, 1980", 1981.

Visiting student, Universitat Erlangen/Nurnberg, Erlangen, West Germany, 1979-1980.   

Courses

HLTH 200: Introduction to Research in Community Health

HLTH 712: Applied Behavioral and Community Health Research Methods

HLTH 781: Research Seminar in Public and Community Health     

Honors and Awards

Career Highlights

  • The Murial R. Sloan Communitarian Award, presented at the Fall 2011 University of Maryland School of Public Health School-wide Faculty meeting.
  • Presidential Commendation, "For unique contribution to the well-being of the American Academy of Health Behavior", March 20, 2011
  • Community-Based-Participatory-Research Best Practices Award, National Community Committee of the CDC Prevention Research Centers Program, April 12, 2011.
  • Community Partnership Engagement Award, National Community Committee of the CDC Prevention Research Centers Program, October 11, 2010.
  • "Metali-Terp" Award (Highlights a poster that incorporates the culture of "Advancing a better state of health" and School of Public Health Spirit), Poster Title: Changing the system to combat HIV disparities: Community stakeholders' perspectives on a proposed technology solution for collaboration. Denise Bellows, Nancy Atkinson, Brian Gilchrist, Suzanne Randolph, Sharon Desmond, Bradley Boekeloo. University of Maryland School of Public Health Research Interaction Day, 2010.
  • Jerry P Wrenn Outstanding Service Award, presented at the Fall 2010 University of Maryland School of Public Health School-wide Faculty meeting.
  • Dean's Faculty Honoree, 3rd Annual University-Wide Celebration of Scholarship and Research, University of Maryland, 2010.
  • Graduate Research Assistant, Brian Gilchrist, received a scholarship for the Mount Sinai International Exchange Program for Minority Students, 2010.
  • Graduate Research Assistant, Denise Bellows, received a Society of Public Health Education travel (SOPHE) scholarship to attend the SOPHE/Prevention Research Center Joint Conference in Atlanta, 2010.
  • Invited to be a member of the National Institutes of Health, College of the Center for Scientific Review, 2010.

Recent Grants

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, University of Maryland Medical System Corporation, Dimensions Health Services, Prince George's County, Public Health Impact Study of Prince George's County. Co-Investigator.

University of Pennsylvania, African American Collaborative Obesity Research Network, Counter Marketing Through Social Media and Social Connections. Co-Investigator.

National Institute of General Medical Sciences, "Climbing Up, Reaching Back:" Ladder of Support for Research Careers in Biomedical and Behavioral Science. Co-Principal Investigator.

National Institute for Child Health and Human Development, "Girls Healthy Dating Relationship Study". Co-Investigator

Infectious Disease and Environmental Health Administration, Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, "Evaluation of Project Self". Principal Investigator.

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention, Centers for Disease Control, "University of Maryland Prevention Research Center". Principal Investigator.

National Institute on Alcohol and Alcohol Abuse, "Peers as Family: Preventing Problem Drinking". Principal Investigator.     

Publications: 

Bellows DM, Howard DE, Boekeloo BO, Randolph SM.  HIV prevention organizations' expertise serving HIV-vulnerable populations: Investigating community concerns. (In Press)

Aldoory L, Bellows D, Boekeloo B, Randolph S.  Inter-organizational collaboration for HIV prevention across the borderland:  Exploring the utility of relationship management theory for building capacity.  (In Press)

Boekeloo B, Geiger T, Wang M, Ishman N, Quinton, S, Allen, G., and Snow D. Evaluation of a socio-cultural intervention to reduce unprotected sex for HIV among African American/Black women. AIDS and Behavior (2015): 1-11. PMID: 25645327  

Boekeloo B, Randolph S, Timmons-Brown S , Wang MQ.  Perceptions of high-achieving African American/Black tenth graders from a low socioeconomic community regarding health scientists and desired careers.  Journal of Allied Health, 2014. 43 (3): 133-139. PMID: 25194058 

(Invited) Boekeloo BO.  Editorial:  Will you ask?  Will they tell you?  Are you ready to hear and respond? Barriers to Physician-Adolescent Discussion about Sexuality, JAMA Pediatrics, on-line Dec. 30, 2013; E1-E3. PMID: 24378601

Zebrak K, Le D, B Boekeloo BO, Wang MQ.  Predictors of intent to pursue a college science education among high achieving minority 10th graders. Current Issues in Education, 2013;16(2):1-12, on-line. PMID: 25598654

 Brooks A, Washington S, Boekeloo B, Gilchrist B, Wang MQ.  Relationship of personal health experiences with interest in health careers among youth from an underserved area.  Journal of Allied Health 2013; 42(3): 127-132 PMID:24013242

Novik MA, Boekeloo BO, Comparison of self-reported and administrative data regarding alcohol misuse among college students. Journal of College Student Development (In Press)

Boekeloo BO, Bellows DM. A case study of HIV/AIDS disparities and correlates among African American/Black Neighborhoods. Public Health Reports (Submitted)

Boekeloo BO , Novik MA. Clinical approaches to improving alcohol education and counseling in adolescents and young adults. Adolescent Medicine: State of the Art Reviews: AM:STARs (In Press)

Hsu CE, Watson K, Boekeloo B, Shang N, Metzger C, Downer G. The use of emerging informatics techniques to evaluate the delivery of NMAETC programs to address HIV and AIDS disparities. Journal of the National Medical Association 2010 Dec;102(12):1116-22. PMID: 21287891

Boekeloo BO, Novik MA, Bush EN. Drinking to get drunk among incoming freshmen college students. American Journal of Health Education 2011;42(2):88-95.

Novik MA, Boekeloo BO, Dimensionality and psychometric analysis of an alcohol protective behavioral strategies scale. Journal of Drug Education 2011; 41(1):69-78.

Novik MA, Howard DE, Boekeloo BO . Drinking motivations and experiences of unwanted sexual advances among undergraduate students. Journal of Interpersonal Violence 2011 Jan;26(1):34-49. Epub 2010 May 6. PMID: 20448235

Boyle J, Boekeloo BO. The association between parent communication and college freshmen's alcohol use. Journal of Drug Education 2009; 39 (2):113-31. PMID: 19999700

Boekeloo, BO, Bush EN, Novik MA, O'Grady KE. Perceptions of alcohol use among freshmen dormitory residents and secondhand effects of others' drinking. Journal of American College Health 2009;57(6):619-628. PMCID: PMC2748425

Boekeloo BO, Griffin MA, Bush EN, O'Grady KE. Impact of the "Peers as Family" Intervention on College Student Alcohol-Related Behavior. Journal of Drug Education 2009;39(4):339-359. PMID: 20443452

Boekeloo BO, Griffin M. Collegiate's intention and confidence to intervene into other's drinking. American Journal of Health Behavior, 2009;33(1):91-100. PMCID: PMC2636505

Galbraith JS, Stanton B, Boekeloo B , King W, Desmond S, Howard D, Black MM, Carey JW. Exploring implementation and fidelity of evidenced-based behavioral interventions for HIV prevention: Lessons learned from the "focus on kids" diffusion case study. Health Education and Behavior, 2009; 36(3): 532 - 549. PMID: 18445739

Howard DE, Griffin MA, Boekeloo BO. Prevalence and psychosocial correlates of alcohol-related sexual assault among university students. Adolescence 2008;43(172):733-750. PMCID: PMC2679161

Howard DE, Griffin M, Boekeloo B, Bellows D. Staying safe while consuming alcohol: a qualitative study of the protective strategies and informational needs of college freshmen. Journal of American College Health. 2007;Nov/Dec56(3):247-254. PMCID: PMC2636553

Boekeloo BO, Griffin MA. Review of clinical trials testing the effectiveness of clinician intervention approaches to prevent alcohol-related problems in adolescent outpatients. Current Pediatric Reviews, 2007, 3, 93-101.

Boyle J, Boekeloo BO. Perceived parental approval of drinking and its impact on problem drinking behaviors among first year college students. Journal of American College Health, 2006,54(4):238-244.

Boekeloo BO, Griffin MA. Review of clinical trials testing the effectiveness of clinician intervention approaches to prevent sexually transmitted diseases in adolescent outpatients. Current Pediatric Reviews, 2005,1(2):173-185.

Boekeloo BO, Jerry J, Lee-Ougo WI, Worrell KD, Hamburger EK, Russek-Cohen E, Snyder M. Randomized trial of brief office-based interventions to reduce adolescent alcohol use. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, 2004;158:635-642.

Beck KH, Boyle JR, Boekeloo BO. Parent monitoring and adolescent drinking: Results of a 12-month follow-up. American Journal of Health Behavior, 2004;28(3):272-279.

Howard DE, Lothen-Kline C, Boekeloo BO. Using the case study methodology to teach ethics to public health students. Health Promotion Practice, 2004; 5(2):151-159.

Lothen-Kline C, Howard DE, Hamburger EK, Worrell KD, Boekeloo BO. Truth and consequences: Ethics, confidentiality, and disclosure in adolescent longitudinal prevention research. Journal of Adolescent Health, 2003; 33:385-394.

Howard DE, Qiu Ye, Boekeloo BO. Personal and social contextual correlates of adolescent dating violence. Journal of Adolescent Health, 2003; 33(1): 9-17.

Lee-Ougo W, Boekeloo BO, Thompson EE, Funnye AS, Jackson RE, ShuTangyie G, McNeil JI. Provider perceptions of key barriers to providing state-of-the-art clinical care for HIV-infected African-American patients. Journal of the National Medical Association, 2003 Feb;95(2 Suppl 2):12S-20S. (This publication appears in a peer-reviewed supplemental issue and was the result of an invitation by the editor to submit a manuscript for peer-reviewed inclusion in this supplement.)

Boekeloo BO, Bobbin MB, Lee WI, Worrell KD, Hamburger EK, Russek-Cohen E. Impact of patient priming and provider prompting on adolescent-provider communication about alcohol. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, 2003 May;157(5):433-9.

Beck KH, Boyle JR, Boekeloo BO. Association of parental monitoring and adolescent alcohol involvement in a clinic population. American Journal of Health Behavior, 2003;27(2):108-115.

Boekeloo BO, Snyder MH, Bobbin M, Burstein GR, Conley D, Quinn TC, Zenilman JM. Provider willingness to screen all sexually active adolescents for chlamydia. Sexually Transmitted Infections, 2002;78:369-373.

Boekeloo BO, Howard D. Oral sexual behavior among adolescents receiving general health examinations. American Journal of Health Behavior, 2002; 26(4):306-314.     

Campus: UMD | Building: Center for Health Literacy | Room: 2367

Office Hours: 

Please email to set up an appt.

Biography

Dina L.G. Borzekowski is an internationally recognized expert in the area of children, media, and health.  In July 2013, Dr. Borzekowski joined the faculty at the School of Public Health at the University of Maryland - as a full Research Professor in the Department of Behavioral and Community Health.  Prior to this appointment, Dr. Borzekowski had been at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health since 2001.  Dr. Borzekowski’s domestic and international research involves studying how youth come to use media and how media has an impact on the health and well-being of children and adolescents.  Some of her most fun and meaningful work has been with Sesame Workshop, developing and evaluating international health communication interventions for some of the world’s most vulnerable children.

VIDEO PRODUCTION

[COMING SOON - Videos from China]

Stop Marlboro - Argentina Video 1. Produced in Buenos Aires, Argentina, November 2015. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lro9snchRHg. 
Stop Marlboro - Argentina Video 2. Produced in Buenos Aires, Argentina, November 2015. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lg5MwGG6Dbo 
Stop Marlboro - Argentina Video 3. Produced in Buenos Aires, Argentina, November  2015.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eEe00BVYheg

Stop Marlboro - Philippines Video 1. Produced in Manila, Philippines.  May 2015. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZG0uHym9QhI
Stop Marlboro - Philippines Video 2. Produced in Manila, Philippines.  May 2015. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oUJmSqWPM6Q
Stop Marlboro - Philippines Video 3. Produced in Manila, Philippines.  May 2015. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L0GX_LagKbo
Stop Marlboro - Philippines Video 4. Produced in Manila, Philippines.  May 2015. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jmujs6J9XfY

Marketing tobacco to children is wrong.  Keep products and ads out of sight. Produced in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, July 2013. https://vimeo.com/80798230
Packages are scary, because tobacco is scary. Keep tobacco away from children. Produced in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, July 2013. https://vimeo.com/80807533

Everyone in the world must smoke. Tobacco marketing and children in Russia.  Produced in Moscow, Russia. October 2013. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5t9SBG-snjg 
Tobacco marketing and children in Russia, video 1.  Produced in Moscow, Russia. October 2013. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=01MOEimN8U4 

Education and Training

1996 -1999   Postdoctoral Research Fellow, NIH, NHLBI, AHA
                   Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention
                   Stanford University, School of Medicine

1994       Ed. D., Human Development and Psychology
              Harvard University, Graduate School of Education
 

1990       Ed. M., Interactive Technology in Education
              Harvard University, Graduate School of Education

1989       M.S., Communications, Computing, and Technology in Education
              Columbia University, Teachers College

1988       B.S., Biology
              Cornell University, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Courses

HLTH300, Biostatistics for Public Health Practice.

HLTH234, Global Health Messages: Understanding Exposure and Impact

Honors and Awards

Honoree, University of Maryland’s Celebration of Scholarship and Research, May 2016 and May 2015.

Nominee, University of Maryland’s Graduate Faculty Mentor of the Year, May 2015.

Consortium of Universities for Global Health (CUGH) Video Competition. First Place, Global Advocacy Category. Boston, MA, 2015.

2012 Society for Adolescent Medicine/Iris F. Litt Visiting Professorship in Adolescent Health Research, awarded March 2011.  Teaching Assignment: University of Otago, New Zealand, June 2012.

Johns Hopkins Advising, Mentoring, & Teaching Recognition Award, May 2005.

Publications: 

Agree, E.M., King, A.C., Castro, C.M., Wiley, A., Borzekowski, D.L.G. (2015). “It’s got to be on this page.” How age and cognitive style affect successful online health seeking. Journal of Medical Internet Research, e79. DOI: 10.2196/jmir.3352

Borzekowski, D.L.G., Cohen, J.E. (2014). Young children’s perceptions of health warning labels on cigarette packages: A study in six countries. Journal of Public Health, 22, 175-185. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10389-014-0612-0%20/fulltext.html

Borzekowski, D.L.G., *Guan Y., Erby, L., Smith, K., Roter, D.  (2013). The Angelina Effect: Immediate reach, grasp, and impact of going public. Genetics in Medicine, 16, 516-521. http://www.nature.com/gim/journal/v16/n7/pdf/gim2013181a.pdf

Borzekowski, Dina L.G., Cohen, Joanna E. (2013). The global reach of tobacco marketing among young children. Pediatrics, 132; e825. http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/132/4/e825.full.pdf+html.

Borzekowski, Dina L.G., McCarthy, Cathy, Rosenfeld, Walter D. (2012).  Ten years of TeenHealthFX.com: A case study of an adolescent health website. Pediatric Clinics of North America: Adolescents and Media. 59(3), 717-727. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2012.03.018.

Borzekowski, D.L.G., Henry, H.K.M.  (2011). The impact of Jalan Sesama on the educational and healthy development of Indonesian preschool children: An experimental study.  International Journal of Behavioral Development, 35, 169 - 179. http://jbd.sagepub.com/content/35/2/169.full.pdf+html.

Borzekowski, D.L.G., Macha, J. (2010).  The impact of Kilimani Sesame on the healthy development of Tanzanian preschool children.  Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 31, 298-305. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0193397310000584.

Borzekowski, D.L.G., Schenk, S., Wilson, J.L., Peebles, R. (2010). e-Ana and e-Mia: A content analysis of pro-ED websites. The American Journal of Public Health, 100, 1526-1534. http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2009.172700.

Borzekowski, Dina L.G.  (2009). Considering Children and Health Literacy: A Theoretical Approach. Pediatrics, 124, S282-S288.  http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/124/Supplement_3/S282.full.pdf.

Robinson, Thomas N., Borzekowski, Dina L.G., Matheson, Donna M., Kraemer, Helena C. (2007). Effects of fast food branding on young children’s taste preferences.  Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, 161(8): 792-797. http://archpedi.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=570933.

Borzekowski, Dina L.G., Robinson, Thomas N.  (2005). The remote, the mouse, and the #2 pencil: Media and academic achievement among 3rd grade students. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, 159: 607-613. http://archpedi.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=486061

Borzekowski, Dina L.G., Rickert, V.I.  (2001). Adolescent cybersurfing for health information: A new resource that crosses barriers.  Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, 155, 813-817. http://archpedi.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=190805.

Borzekowski, Dina L.G., Robinson, Thomas N.  (2001). The 30-second effect: An experiment revealing the impact of television commercials on food preferences of preschoolers.  Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 101: 42-46. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0002822301000128

Assistant Professor, Health Services Administration
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 3310A
Phone: (301) 405-6118 |
CV / Resume
PDF icon BoudreauxCV_August17.pdf
Biography

Michel Boudreaux is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Services Administration in the School of Public Health, University of Maryland. Dr. Boudreaux conducts research in interrelated areas of health policy. He is especially interested in publicly financed health programs for low-income populations and how they affect the evolution of health, human capital and socioeconomic position across the life-course. He also maintains an active research agenda focused on improving the quality and usability of health insurance measures collected in federal surveys. His work has appeared in Health Affairs, Health Services Research, Journal of Health Economics, Medical Care, Medical Care Research and Review, and other outlets. He received a PhD (2014) in Health Services Research, Policy, and Administration from the University of Minnesota.

Education and Training

Ph.D., Health Services Research, Policy and Administration, University of Minnesota, 2014
M.S., Health Services Research, Policy and Administration, University of Minnesota, 2009
B.A., Religion, Augsburg College, 2003

Honors and Awards
2015-16   NIH Loan Repayment Program (NIMHD). Infant and Maternal Health in Massachussetts.
2015        Honorable Mention, Heinz Dissertation Award, National Accademy of Social Insurance
2015        Honoree, Campus Wide Research and Scholarship Celebration, University of Maryland  
Publications: 

Boudreaux, M. Blewett, L. Fried, B. Hempstead, K. Karaca-Mandic, P. 2016. “Community Characteristics and Qualified Health Plan Selection.”  Health Services Research. Published online ahead of print. doi: 10.1111/1475-6773.12525

Lewin, A. Mitchell, S. Beers, L. Schmitz, K. Boudreaux, M. 2016. “Improved Contraceptive Use among Teen Mothers in a Patient-Centered Medical Home.” Journal of Adolescent Health 59: 171-176.

Boudreaux, M. Golberstein, E. McAlpine D. 2016. “The Long-Term Impacts of Medicaid Exposure in Early Childhood: Evidence from the Program's Origin.” Journal of Health Economics 45: 161-175.

Pascale, J. Boudreaux, M. King, R. 2016. “Understanding the new health insurance instrument in the Current Population Survey.”  Health Service Research 51(1): 240-261.

Boudreaux, M. Gonzales, G. Blewett, L. Fried, B. Karaca-Mandic, P. 2016. “Residential High Speed Internet Among Those Likely to Benefit from an Online Health Insurance Marketplace.” Inquiry. January-December 2016. doi: 10.1177/0046958015625231

Boudreaux, M. Call, K. Turner, J. Fried, B. O’Hara, B. 2015. “Measurement error to public health insurance in the American Community Survey: Evidence from record linkage.” Health Services Research 50 (6): 1973-1995.

Blewett, LA. Marmor, S. Pintor, J. Boudreaux, M. 2014. “Aligning US health and immigration policy to reduce the incidence of tuberculosis.” The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 18(4): 397-404.

Sonier, J. Boudreaux, MH. Blewett, L. 2013. “Potential ACA impacts on Medicaid enrollment among currently eligible but not enrolled populations: Evidence from Massachusetts.” Health Affairs. 32(7): 1319-1325.

Call KT, Blewett LA, Boudreaux MH. Turner J. 2013 “Monitoring health reform efforts: Which state level data to use?” Inquiry 50(2): 93-105.

Abraham, J. Karaca-Mandic, P. Boudreaux, M. 2013. “Sizing up the individual market for health insurance: A comparison of survey and administrative data sources.” Medical Care Research and Review. 70(4): 418-433

Berg, C.J. Kirch, M. Hooper, M.W. McAlpine, D. An, L. Boudreaux, M. Ahluwalia, J.S. 2012. “Ethnic group differences in the relationship between depressive symptoms and smoking.” Ethnicity and Health. 17(1-2): 55-69.

Davern, M. Blewett, L. Lee, B. Boudreaux, M. King, M. 2012. “Use of the Integrated Health Interview Series: Trends in medical provider utilization (1972-2008).” Epidemiologic Perspectives & Innovations. 9:2

Call, K.T. Davern, M. Boudreaux, M.  Johnson, P. Nelson, J. 2011. "Bias in telephone surveys that do not sample cell phones: Uses and limits of post- stratification adjustments." Medical Care. 49(4): 355-364.

Boudreaux, M. Ziegenfuss, J. Graven, P. Davern, M. Blewett, L. 2011. “Counting uninsurance and means-tested coverage in the American Community Survey: A comparison to the Current Population Survey.” Health Services Research. 46(1): 210-231.

Professor Emerita, Family Science
Faculty Scholar
Other Affiliations: Horowitz Center for Health Literacy, UMD Prevention Research Center
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health

Website: 
University of Maryland Insuring Your Health
Office Hours: 

Contact via email to set up a time to talk via telephone.

CV / Resume
PDF icon Braun_Bonnie CV February 2016.pdf
Biography

Selected Grants

University of Maryland "Moving Maryland Forward"

University of Maryland Extension and College of Agriculture and Natural Resources Health Insurance Literacy Initiative

NIH-NIDCR: Multi-Center Assessment of Health Literacy and Oral Health.

UDSA Rural Health and Safety Grant: Core Health Messages: A Strategy to Improve the Health and Well-being of Rural, Low-income Families.

USDA and UMCP: Rural Families Speak: Livin’ on the Byways:  Rural Mothers Speak—a research-based drama.
Overview of: Livin' on Life's Byways: Rural Mothers Speak
Livin' on Life's Byways - Permission Form
Livin' on Life's Byways - Feedback Form

University of Maryland Extension:  Sages of the Ages: Stories That Touch and Teach

Education and Training

Ph.D., Family Consumer Sciences Education, University of Missouri

Honors and Awards
  • Family Economics Resource Management Community Education Award, American Association of Family and Consumer Science for Smart Choice Health Insurance©—an Extension health insurance literacy curriculum
  • Served as the first Herschel S. Horowitz Center of Health Literacy Endowed Chair and Director
  • Author of over 100 articles and seven family and consumer science teaching curricula; speaker at over 200 local, state, national and international conferences
  • Director and Co-director of grants and contracts totaling more than $15M
  • Co-Director, Maryland Family Policy Impact Seminar
  • Past Chair, Maryland Rural Council
  • Past President, American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences and former Public Policy Committee Chair; Past-chair, Family Policy Section, National Council on Family Relations
  • Recipient of awards including:  National 4-H Annie E. Casey Foundation Distinguished Lecturer; George F. Kramer Practitioner of Year; Philip Merrill Presidential Scholar Mentor; Murial Sloan Communitarian Aware, Ruth O’Brien Research Award; American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences Chalkley-Fenn Public Policy Visiting Scholar; USDA Honor Award for Nutrition Education for Diverse Audiences; Farm Foundation Outstanding Public Policy Issues Education; Charter Inductee, International Adult and Continuing Education Hall of Fame; Distinguished Alumni, University of Central Missouri; W.K. Kellogg National Leadership Fellow.
Collaborators

University of Delaware Extension

University of Vermont

Maryland Rural Health Association

Healthy Howard Doors to Care

National 4-H Council

Publications: 

Rodgers, M. & Braun, B. (June, 2015). Strategic directions for extension health and wellness programs. Journal of Extension. 53(3).  http://www.joe.org/joe/2015june/tt1.php

Inwood, S., Braun, B., Knudson, A., Parker, J., Parsons, B. (April, 2015). Farmers and health care reform: A challenge and opportunity for Extension. Journal of Extension. 53(2). http://www.joe.org/joe/2015april/comm2.php

Aldoory, L., Braun, B., Maring, E.F., Dugal, M., & Briones, R. (March, 2015).  Empowerment in the process of health messaging for rural, low-income mothers:  An exploratory message design project. Women & Health. 55(3). 297-313.

Ginter, A. & Braun, B. (2014). Female breast cancer patients' needs and resources: Implications for patients without partners and health care professionals. Journal of Women’s Health Issues and Care. 3(3). 1-9.

Ginter, A. and Braun, B. (2014). Single mothers with breast cancer:  Relationships with their  children. In S. L. Blair and J.H. McCormick (Eds). Contemporary perspectives in family research.  United Kingdom:  Emerald Group Publishing Limited. 163-182.

Brown, V. & Braun, B. (2013). An intersection of opportunity:  Extension family & consumer sciences and public health. Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences. 105(4). Feature article.

Kim, J., Braun, B. & Williams, A.D. (2013, September). Understanding health insurance literacy:  A literature review.  Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal, 42, 3-13. 

Lie, D., Carter-Pokras, O., Braun, B., & Coleman C. (2012, October). What do health literacy and cultural competence have in common? Calling for a collaborative pedagogy. Journal of Health Communications International Perspectives, 17(3), 13-22. 

Dolan, E.M., Seiling, S.B., Braun, B., & Katras, M.J. (2012). Having their say: Rural mothers talk  about welfare. Poverty and Public Policy, 4, 1-18.

 

Director of Academic Facilities and Operations, Office of the Dean
Building: School of Public Health
Phone: (301) 405-2440 |
Ph.D., Kinesiology
Mental Performance Consultant UMD Field Hockey
Other Affiliations: UMD - Not within SPH
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health

Biography

Dr. Evan B. Brody serves on the faculty of The Department of Kinesiology, School of Public Health, The University of Maryland at College Park where he teaches Psychology of Sport.  Dr. Brody has worked in professional golf, has served teams in the National Hockey League, athletes in other professional and amateur sports, and at the Olympic and Paralympic level. In addition, he has applied his expertise in the corporate, law enforcement and military environments.

Dr. Brody earned his M.A. in exercise physiology and his Ph.D. in kinesiology, with an emphasis in the psychology of sport and exercise from the University of Maryland at College Park. His area of expertise is exercise and sport psychophysiology, the study of the interaction of the mind and body related to peak performance.

Dr. Brody has taught at both the university and secondary ­school levels, ranging from martial arts instruction to teaching courses on exercise and sport psychology, strength and conditioning, stress reduction and worksite health promotion. He has published and presented his research both nationally and internationally on such topics as the psychophysiology of skilled athletic performance in marksmen and runners, and the use of mental preparation strategies to enhance strength performance.

Courses

KNES350-Psychology of Sport

 KNES497-Senior Seminar in Psychology of Sport.

Amy Brown
Affiliate Professor, Applied Environmental Health (MIAEH)
Professor, Department of Entomology
Building: School of Public Health
Phone: 301-405-3928 |
CV / Resume
PDF icon Amy Brown CV.pdf
Biography

Dr. Brown coordinates the State of Maryland Pesticide Education & Assessment Program. Her research focuses on identifying practices that minimize exposure and can be effectively implemented, and on health effects of pesticide exposure.

Education and Training

Ph.D., Marine- Estuarine Environmental Sciences- Toxicology specialty, University of Maryland- College Park M.S., Entomology, Michigan State University B.S., Entomology and Nematology, University of Florida- Gainesville

Associate Professor (Joint Appointment), Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Associate Professor, Dept. of Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine
Campus: UMB | Building: HH | Room: 1ST FL
Phone: (410)706-1058 |
Website: 
University of Maryland School of Medicine profile
Senior Lecturer, Kinesiology
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2343
Phone: (301) 405-2503 |
CV / Resume
Microsoft Office document icon BBrown_CV_Mar2007.doc
Biography

Dr. Elizabeth Brown has been on the faculty in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Maryland, College Park for the past twenty years. She has a focus is on undergraduate teaching, advising and recruiting.

She has been a speaker at career day functions in the local county schools, a presenter at MAPHERD, New York AAPHERD and EDA-AAPHERD as well as AAPHERD conventions. Dr. Brown is a member of the speaker's bureau for the Maryland State Commission on Physical Fitness and has been a member of the Governor's Council on Physical Fitness for the past eleven years. Dr. Brown's expertise is in Sports Psychology and Educational Psychology. Her major emphasis of research is involved in parental influences on children's psychology development through sport as well as the pressures children face in youth sport. Her awards include Excellence in Teaching Award from the Center of Teaching Excellence at the University of Maryland, Outstanding Service Award, College of Health and Human Performance at the University of Maryland, and McNeely Merit Award, MAHPERD.

 

Courses

Undergraduate Courses:

Spring 2003:

Fall 2002:

Jessica Brown
Assistant Professor (Joint Appointment), Behavioral and Community Health
Assistant Professor, Dept. of Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine
Campus: UMB | Building: Howard Hall | Room: 215A
Phone: (410)706-8060 |
Website: 
University of Maryland School of Medicine profile
DrPH
Agent/Assistant Professor
Other Affiliations: UMD - Not within SPH
Campus: Off Campus | Building: 700 Agricultural Center Drive Westminster, MD
Phone: (410) 386-2760 |
Biography

Dr. Brown works in the community conducting research and delivering programming to enhance the health communication and literacy of residents. Her work involves empowering citizens to communicate and work with their physicians and educating Marylanders about health insurance. Her work and research is consistently grounded in behavioral and communication theories to ensure her programs are grounded in the best science available. Click here for Dr. Brown’s CV.

Faculty Specialist, Behavioral and Community Health
Office of Planning and Evaluation
Other Affiliations: Center on Young Adult Health and Development, Office of the Dean
Campus: UMD | Building: Center on Young Adult Health and Development | Room: 1242HH
Phone: (301) 405-9748 |
Website: 
www.cyahd.umd.edu
Biography

Brittany Bugbee is a Faculty Specialist at the Center on Young Adult Health and Development at the University of Maryland School of Public Health. Since 2010, she has worked on the College Life Study, a comprehensive longitudinal study of factors that place college students at risk for mental health problems and substance use. She has served as Recruitment Coordinator of the study since 2012, overseeing the recruitment of over 1,000 study participants and managing the data quality assurance process. She assists with the preparation of scientific publications and reports and has experience with using TeleForm, Qualtrics, Microsoft Access, and NVivo for research applications. She holds an MPH in Behavioral and Community Health, as well as undergraduate degrees in Community Health and Spanish Language, Literature, and Culture, all from the University of Maryland.

Education and Training

M.P.H., Behavioral and Community Health, University of Maryland 2016

B.A., Spanish Language, Literature, and Culture, University of Maryland, 2012

B.S., Community Health, University of Maryland, 2012

Publications: 

Please see the CYAHD Publications Page.

Faculty Research Assistant, UMD Prevention Research Center
Campus: UMD | Building: SPH | Room: 0228
Phone: (301) 405-9114 |
Director of ESSIC, Professor in Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science, Applied Environmental Health (MIAEH)
Affiliate in MIAEH
Campus: UMD | Building: M Square Research Park | Room: Building 950, Room 4097
Phone: 301-405-5599 |
Biography

Antonio Busalacchi is the Director of Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC) and a Professor in the Department of Atmospheric & Oceanic Science. Tony came to ESSIC in 2000, after serving as Chief of the NASA/Goddard Laboratory for Hydrospheric Processes. He has studied tropical ocean circulation and its role in the coupled climate system. His interests include the study of climate variability and prediction, tropical ocean modeling, ocean remote sensing, and data assimilation. His research in these areas has supported a range of international and national research programs dealing with global change and climate, particularly as affected by the oceans.

Education and Training

Ph.D., Oceanography, Florida State University 

M.S., Oceanography, Florida State University

B.S., Physics, Florida State University 

Courses

AOSC 680: Introduction to Earth System Science

Associate Professor, Behavioral and Community Health
Associate Director, Maryland Center for Health Equity
Other Affiliations: Center for Health Equity
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1234Y
Phone: (301) 405-0757 |
Biography

Dr. Butler’s research is anchored in an ecological framework that incorporates individual, social structure and environmental influences in understanding and eliminating tobacco-related health disparities.  He is dedicated to building ongoing and permanent relationships with community members for the purpose of designing and conducting interventions where the community participates fully in all aspects of the research process. Dr. Butler is a behavioral scientist with more than 17 years of experience carrying out community engaged research and practice with African Americans. Moreover, he has extensive experience conducting qualitative research including focus groups and in-depth interviews. Dr. Butler completed postdoctoral training in cancer prevention and tobacco control; focusing on strategies for recruiting and retaining African American public housing residents in cluster-randomized clinical trials. Further, he is a Graduate Fellow in Randomized Behavioral Clinical Trials and the Principal Investigator of a National Cancer Institute-funded Career Development Award to Promote Diversity (K01); where this research agenda examined the smoking cessation needs of African American public housing residents and the requisite strategies for engaging the residents in smoking cessation research.

Education and Training

Postdoctoral Fellowship - Cancer Prevention and Tobacco Control, Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Kansas School of Medicine, Kansas City, KS, 2000 – 2003. Advisor: Jasjit S. Ahluwalia, MD, MPH, MS.

Dr.P.H. - Health Services Administration, Department of Health Services Administration, Division of Behavioral and Community Health Sciences, Graduate School of Public Health, The University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, 1999. Dissertation, Being there: Exploring the fatherhood experiences and beliefs of low-income urban African American males.

M.Ed. - Community Health Education, Department of Public Health, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, 1994. Masters Essay, Eating habits of inner city preschool African American children: History and future.

B.H.S. - Clinical Laboratory Science, Gwynedd-Mercy College, Gwynedd Valley, PA, 1991. Area of Concentration, Clinical Microbiology.

A.A.S. - Medical Laboratory Technology, With Honors. Community College of Philadelphia, PA, 1986.

Diploma - Medical Laboratory Technology, Franklin School of Science and Arts, Philadelphia, PA, 1974.

Courses

HLTH 140: Personal and Community Health

HLTH 391: Principles of Community Health I

HLTH 774: Community Health Program Planning

 

Honors and Awards

2016 - present - Fellow, Academy for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (AETL), University of Maryland, College Park. Individuals are selected as Academy Fellows via peer review. An Academy Fellow remains one as long as his or her affiliation continues with the University of Maryland.

2016 - Most Valuable Professor (M.V.P.). Student-athletes are asked to nominate a professor that they feel went “above and beyond the call of duty” and is someone who “stands out” as a memorable professor to them. Two student-athletes from the University of Maryland Wrestling Team individually nominated Dr. Butler to receive an M.V.P. certificate, which was presented at the wrestling match between the University of Maryland and Rider University on February 20, 2016.

2015 - Exceptional Educator Award, The Academy for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (AETL), University of Maryland, College Park. This award is given by the AETL to recognize exceptional University of Maryland teachers. The AETL is a group comprised of faculty members from all disciplines committed to providing quality education to University of Maryland, College Park students.  

2014; 2015 - Graduate Faculty Mentor of the Year Award (Nominated). The Graduate Faculty Mentor of the Year Award acknowledges outstanding achievement in mentoring by recognizing University of Maryland – College Park faculty who have made exceptional contributions to a student’s (or students’) graduate education experience. This Award serves the dual purposes of recognizing outstanding mentoring provided by individual faculty and of reminding the university community of the signal importance of mentoring to graduate studies.

2014 – 2015 - Undergraduate Studies Faculty Fellow (formally Lily Fellows), Office of Undergraduate Studies, University of Maryland, College Park. Faculty Fellows participate in a faculty learning community that considers the challenges and opportunities of teaching large enrollment courses and seeks to understand and define these courses as uniquely important for student success. Fellows receive $4,000 in recognition of their contribution to improving undergraduate learning.

2014 - Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health (ASPPH)/Pfizer Early Career in Public Health Teaching Award (Nominated). This award recognizes one full-time, graduate, public health faculty from a Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH)-accredited member-school or -program of public health who is early in his or her career and notable for teaching excellence.

2013 – 2014 - Scholar, The Inaugural ADVANCE Program for Inclusion Excellence, Office of Diversity and Inclusion, University of Maryland (UMD), College Park. This year-long career development and leadership training program responds to the UMD goal of supporting faculty excellence, advancing faculty diversity, and creating a strategic network of faculty of color.

2012 - Graduate Fellow in Randomized Behavioral Clinical Trials, 12th Annual Summer Institute on Randomized Behavioral Clinical Trials. Sponsored by the NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, the Institute includes intensive twelve-day training in the planning, design, and execution of randomized clinical trials involving behavioral interventions.

2009 - Recipient, African American Alumni Council, Blue, Gold, and Black: The Color of Achievement Award for Pride, Progress, and Partnership with The University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

2008 - 2009 - FellowCareer Education and Enhancement for Healthcare Research Diversity Program (CEED), Institute for Clinical Research Education, The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA. The CEED Program included the following coursework: Research Design and Development Seminar (CLRES 2071 & 2072); Medical Writing and Presentation Skills (MEDEDU 2140); Course in Scientific Management and Leadership (OACD Workshop).

2005 - 2010 - Health Disparities Research Scholar, NIH Loan Repayment Program. The program is a peer-reviewed, competitive grant process supporting health disparities research across various disciplines.

 

 

 

 

 

Publications: 

Selected Publications

Butler J, Fryer CS, Ward E, Westaby K, Adams A, Esmond SL, Garza MA, Hogle J, Scholl LM, Quinn SC, Thomas SB, Sorkness CA (2017). The health equity leadership institute (HELI): Developing workforce capacity for health disparities research. Journal of Clinical and Translational Science, 1(3), 153-159.

Mayfield-Johnson S & Butler J (2017). Moving from pictures to social action: An introduction to photovoice as a participatory action tool. New Dimensions for Adult and Continuing Education: Practical Insights, 154, 49-59.

Blue Roberts E, Butler J, Green KM (2017). Barriers to Evaluating Physical Activity Programs in American Indian/Alaska Native Communities. American Journal of Evaluation. DOI: 10.1177/1098214017733544.

Mead EL, Lindstrom Johnson S, Siddiqui J, Butler J, Kirchner T, Feldman RH (2017). Beyond blunts: Reasons for cigarette and cigar use among African American young adult dual users. In press, Addiction Research and Theory.

Garza MA, Quinn SC, Li Y, Assini-Meytin L, Casper E, Fryer CS, Butler J, Brown NA, Kim K, Thomas SB (2017). The influence of race and ethnicity on becoming a human subject: Factors associated with participation in research.  Contemporary Clinical Trials Communications, 7, 57-63.

Blue Roberts E, Butler J, Green KM (2016). Identifying and understanding indigenous ways of evaluating physical activity programs. American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research, 23(5), 34-58.

Passmore SR, Fryer CS, Butler J, Garza MA, Thomas SB, Quinn SC (2016). Building a “deep fund of good will”: Reframing research engagement.  Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, 27(1), 722-740.

Fakunle D, Milan AJ, Furr-Holden CD, Butler J, LaVeist TA (2016). The inequitable distribution of tobacco outlet density: The role of income in two black mid-Atlantic geopolitical areas. Public Health, 136, 36-40. 2016:doi:10.1016/j.puhe.2016.02.032.

Fryer CS, Passmore SR, Maietta R, Casper E, Brown NA, Butler J, Garza MA, Thomas SB, Quinn SC (2015). The symbolic value and limitations of racial concordance in minority research engagement. Qualitative Health Research, 1-12. DOI: 10.1177/1049732315575708.

Mayfield-Johnson S, Rachal J, Butler J (2014). “When we learn better, we do better”: Describing changes in empowerment through photovoice among community health advisors in a breast and cervical cancer health promotion program in Mississippi and Alabama. Adult Education Quarterly, 64(2), 91-109. DOI: 10.1177/0741713614521862.

Butler J, Quinn SC, Fryer CS, Garza MA, Kim K, Thomas SB (2013). Characterizing researchers by strategies used for retaining minority populations: Results of a national survey. Contemporary Clinical Trials, 36(1), 61-67.

Quinn SC, Butler J, Fryer CS, Garza MA, Kim KH, Ryan C, Thomas SB (2012). Attributes of researchers and their strategies to recruit minority populations: Results of a national survey. Contemporary Clinical Trials, 33(6), 1231-1237.

Quinn SC, Garza MA, Butler J, Fryer CS, Casper E, Thomas SB, Barnard D, Kim K (2012). Improving informed consent with minority participants: Results from researchers and community surveys. Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics, 7(5), 44-55. PMCID: PMC3685140

Butler J, Fryer CS, Reed EA, Thomas SB (2011). Utilizing the school health index to build collaboration between a university and an urban school district. Journal of School Health, 81(12), 774-782.

Senior Faculty Specialist, Behavioral and Community Health
Associate Director, Center on Young Adult Health and Development
Other Affiliations: Center on Young Adult Health and Development
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1242CC
Phone: (301) 405-9778 |
Website: 
www.cyahd.umd.edu
Biography

Ms. Caldeira’s research focuses on understanding the health outcomes associated with alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use in young adulthood, with an emphasis on mental health outcomes. The trajectories of substance use during college and throughout young adulthood have been a special focus of her work. Substance use patterns are seen as being influenced by a constellation of both environmental factors (e.g., parenting styles, access and opportunity) and trait factors (e.g., family history, temperament, personality). Additional research interests include understanding the prevalence and correlates of frequent gambling, suicidality, risky sexual behavior, and HIV testing behavior in college students.

Education and Training

Master of Science, Occupational Therapy, Towson University, 1999

Bachelor of Science, Biology, College of William And Mary, 1994

Publications: 

Please see the CYAHD Publications Page.

Senior Faculty Specialist, Behavioral and Community Health
Director of Operations, Center on Young Adult Health and Development and Director of Operations, Office of Planning and Evaluation
Other Affiliations: Center on Young Adult Health and Development, Office of the Dean
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1242BB
Phone: (301) 405-9768 |
Website: 
www.cyahd.umd.edu
Education and Training

MA, University of Maryland College Park

BA, Wake Forest University

Publications: 

Please see the CYAHD Publications Page.

Professor, Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Associate Dean for Diversity and Inclusion
Other Affiliations: Center for Health Equity, UMD Prevention Research Center
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2234G
Phone: (301) 405-8037 |
Website: 
Cultural Competency in Healthcare
CV / Resume
File CV_Carter-Pokras.4.19.17.docx
Biography

A health disparities researcher for three decades, Dr. Olivia Carter-Pokras has been recognized by the Governor of Maryland, Surgeon General, Assistant Secretary for Health, and Latino Caucus of the American Public Health Association for her career achievements to improve racial/ethnic data, develop health policy to address health disparities, and improve health care quality for Latinos.  Dr. Carter-Pokras is the PI for a PCORI engagement contract “The Patient Voice in Cultural Diversity Training for Patient Centered Outcomes Researchers,” and a School Health Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Evaluation Project for the state of Maryland. She also serves as Co-Investigator for the University of Maryland’s PATIENTS program which supports patient centered outcomes research at the University of Maryland.

Dr. Carter-Pokras has led NIH funded research projects to develop cultural competency and health literacy curricula, and served as Co-Investigator for a European Commission funded project to develop cultural diversity training for health professional educators. A long-time member of Montgomery County’s Latino Health Steering Committee, Dr. Carter-Pokras conducts health assessments and program evaluation for Latinos in close partnership with local government and community based organizations. Dr. Carter-Pokras has published 69 peer-reviewed journal articles (cited over 4200 times), and her research has played a critical role in national recognition of health disparities experienced by Latinos.

She is an elected fellow of the American College of Epidemiology and chaired the American College of Epidemiology’s Policy Committee. Dr. Carter-Pokras has served on the boards of the American College of Epidemiology and the American Public Health Association, and was a member of the Institute of Medicine’s Advancing Pain Research, Care, and Education Committee, and the population research workgroup that contributed to the National Pain Strategy. She has a particular interest in translation of epidemiologic research into policy and practice to improve Latino population health. Dr. Carter-Pokras lectures on chronic disease epidemiology, epidemiologic methods, cultural competency and health disparities to public health students and health professionals.

Education and Training

1994               The Johns Hopkins University, Epidemiology                    Ph.D.

1982               The Johns Hopkins University, Biostatistics                     M.H.S.

1979                Tulane University, Biology                                              B.S.

Courses

EPIB 610: Foundations of Epidemiology (Syllabus)

EPIB 620: Chronic Disease Epidemiology (Syllabus)

ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Olivia_Carter-pokras/

Honors and Awards

2016                          Muriel R. Sloan Communitarian Award, University of Maryland School of Public Health

2014                           Pioneer in Pain Award for service on the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee on Advancing Pain Research, Care, and Education. Western Pain Society.

2013, 2014                  Merit Award, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Maryland School of Public Health

2013                            American Public Health Association award for service on the APHA Education Board 2010-2013

2013                           Jerry P. Wrenn Outstanding Service Award, University of Maryland School of Public Health

2008-2012                   Recognized at annual University-Wide Celebration of Scholarship and Research

2011                           American Public Health Association 2011 CoA Reception award for service on ACBI Advisory Committee

2011                           Faculty Inductee, University of Maryland School of Public Health Gamma Zeta Chapter of Delta Omega, the Honorary Society in Public Health

2010                           American Public Health Association award for leadership and service on the APHA Executive Board 2006-2010

2010                           Governor’s Hispanic Heritage Month Awardee:  Healthcare Champion

2006                           Latino Health Initiative, Montgomery County recognition plaque

2005                           Montgomery County Executive Certificate of Recognition & Appreciation

Publications: 

Von Korff M, Scher A, Helmick C, Carter-Pokras O, Dodick D, Goulet J, Hamill-Ruth R,  LeResche L, Massey M, Porter L, Tait R, Terman G, Veasley C, Mackey S.  United States National Pain Strategy for Population Research: Concepts, Definitions and Pilot Data. Journal of Pain (In Press)

Jaschek G, Carter-Pokras O, He X, Lee S, Canino G. Association of Child Maltreatment and Depressive Symptoms among Puerto Rican Youth. Child Abuse and Neglect (In Press).

*Kanamori M, Carter-Pokras O, Madhavan S, Lee S, He X, Feldman R. Overweight status of the primary caregivers of orphan and vulnerable children in 3 Southern African countries: a cross sectional study. BMC Public Health. 2015;15:757. DOI. DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2061-2

*Kanamori M, Beck K, Carter-Pokras O. Understanding How Social Network and Mass Media Factors Can Influence Cigarette Smoking among Asthmatic Adolescents. Journal of School Health. Journal of School Health. 2015 Mar;85(3):155-62. doi: 10.1111/josh.12238.

*Kanamori M, Carter-Pokras O, Madhavan S, Lee S, He X, Feldman R. Associations Between Orphan and Vulnerable Child Caregiving, Household Wealth Disparities, and Women's Overweight Status in Three Southern African Countries Participating in Demographic Health Surveys. Maternal and Child Health Journal. 2015 Jan 29. [Epub ahead of print]

Martinez-Garcia G, Carter-Pokras O, Atkinson N, Portnoy B, Lee S. Do Latino youth really want to get pregnant?: Assessing pregnancy wantedness among male and female Latino youth. American Journal of Sexuality Education. 2014;9(3):329-346.

Goode TD, Carter-Pokras O, Horner-Johnson W, Yee S. Parallel tracks: reflections on the need for collaborative health disparities research on race/ethnicity and disability. Medical Care. 2014 Oct;52 Suppl 3:S3-8. doi: 10.1097/MLR.0000000000000201

*Kanamori M, Carter-Pokras O, Madhavan S, Feldman R, He X, Lee S. Orphan/vulnerable child caregiving moderates the association between women’s autonomy and their BMI in three African countries. AIDS Care. 2014;3:1-10. [Epub ahead of print]

Wallen J, Randolph S, Carter-Pokras O, Feldman R, *Kanamori M. “Every year I say I’m going to stop:” Engaging African Americans in smoking cessation programs. American Journal of Health Education.  2014;45:151-157.

Carvajal DN*, Ghazarian SR, Crowne SS, Brown PB**, Pokras OC, Duggan AK, Barnet B. Is Depression Associated with Contraceptive Motivations, Intentions, and Use Among a Sample of Low-Income Latinas. Womens Health Issues. 2014 January - February;24(1):e105-e113. doi: 10.1016/j.whi.2013.10.003. PMID: 24439935. ?<http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24439935

*Okafor MT, Carter-Pokras O, Zhan M. Greater Dietary Acculturation (Dietary Change) is associated with Poorer Current Self-rated Health among African Immigrant Adults. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior. 01/2014; DOI:10.1016/j.jneb.2013.11.015  

Science Writer/Editor, Maryland Center for Health Equity, Center for Health Equity
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health

Erica Casper is the science writer and editor for the Maryland Center for Health Equity at the University of Maryland’s School of Public Health. Erica obtained a Master’s degree in marine science from the Boston University Marine Program in Woods Hole, MA. She has worked for the State of Florida to improve the surface water quality in southwest Florida, and has worked at the University of South Florida’s College of Marine Science to develop molecular assays for the detection of human pathogenic organisms contaminating coastal marine waters. At the Maryland Center for Health Equity she is responsible for scientific writing and editing of peer reviewed articles, creation of presentations, and preparing press releases for the center, among other things. She has a particular interest in science writing as a way to not only present research findings to the scientific community, but also to bring these findings and advancements to the greater public.

IT Coordinator, Office of the Dean
Campus: UMD | Building: SPH | Room: 2241
Phone: 301-405-9825 |
Adjunct Professor, Family Science
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1142 School of Public Health
Phone: 301.405.3672 |
Suhana Chattopadhyay
Faculty Research Assistant, Applied Environmental Health (MIAEH)
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2234
Phone: (301) 405-5509 |
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health Building | Room: 3310E
Phone: (301) 405-9053 |
Website: 
Hospital And Public health interdisciPlinarY research (HAPPY) Lab
CV / Resume
PDF icon Jie Chen Curriculum Vitae
Biography

Dr. Jie Chen is an associate professor in the Department of Health Services Administration at the School of Public Health, University of Maryland at College Park. Dr. Chen’s research fields include (1) health care disparities; (2) health care delivery system and policy; (3) behavioral health; and (4) economic evaluation.  Her work uses a multidisciplinary perspective and involves collaboration with clinical leaders, community partners, and organizational decision makers. Most recently she has conducted research on patient-centered medical homes, including designing personalized patient activation and empowerment strategies to encourage and sustain patients’ involvement in their treatment. Her research on behavioral health focuses on the integration of health care organizations to promote behavioral health of vulnerable populations. Dr. Chen is also interested to study the impact of health policy initiatives and changing economic conditions on health care access, utilization, and health disparities. An additional field of her research involves economic evaluation, including cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analysis of community intervention and state/federal policies. Dr. Chen has more than fifteen years of research experience developing, refining, and applying analytical methods to evaluate the impact of health policy and the health care delivery system on population health outcomes.

Selected Projects:

  • R01MD011523 (Chen, PI): Effects of Hospital-Community-Public Health Integration on Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Mental Health                                   07/12/2017-2/28/2022
  • R21MH106813-01 (Chen, PI): Effect of Local Health Departments on Health Care Disparities for Individuals with Mental Health Disorders                            01/01/2016-12/31/2017
  • 5R24HS022135-02 (Mullins, PI; Chen, Pilot PI): Personalized Strategies to Activate and Empower Patients in Health and Health Care                                  09/30/2013- 09/29/2018
  • 5R01MD010255-03 (Slade, PI; Chen, co-I): Impact of Payment Reform on Racial Disparities in Hospital Psychiatric Care                                                       03/1/2017-2/28-2018
  • Maryland Health Care Commission (Franzini, PI; Chen, co-I): Health Matters: Navigating an Enhanced Rural Health Model for Maryland, Lessons Learned from the Mid-Shore Counties                               08/2016-10/2017
  • Maryland Department of Health & Mental Hygiene and the Community Health Resources Commission:  Prince George’s County Health Enterprise Zone Capitol Heights 20743 (Carter, PI; Chen, health economist)                                            07/01/2013 – 06/30/2017

 

 

Education and Training

2008: Ph.D., Department of Economics, State University of New York, Stony Brook

2006: M.A., Department of Economics, State University of New York, Stony Brook

2001: B.S., Department of Management Information System, School of Business, Shanghai University, China

Courses

HLSA601 Introduction to Health Care Systems

HLSA711 Health Economics and Analysis

HLSA709 Current Topics in Health Services Research

HLSA765 Oral and Written Communication (co-teaching)

HLSA791 Advanced Research Seminar II

HLSA899 Doctoral Dissertation Research

HLSA898 Pre-candidacy research 

HLSA799 Master’s Thesis Research

HLSA786 Capstone Project in Public Health 

Honors and Awards

2017: Research and Development Award, School of Public Health, University of Maryland

2015 - 2017: Honoree, University of Maryland Ninth Annual Celebration of Scholarship and Research

2014: Delta Omega Gamma Zeta Chapter the Honorary Society in Public Health

2013: Recipient of the Research and Scholarship Award at the University of Maryland

2012: Minority Scholarship for Travel, National Institute of Aging

Publications: 

Selected from 60+ publications:

Chen J, Novak P, Barath D, Goldman H, and Mortenson K. Local Health Departments' Promotion of Mental Health Care and Reductions in 30-Day All-Cause Readmission Rates in Maryland. Medical Care. In Press.

Chen J, Bloodworth R, Novak P, Cook B, Goldman H, Rendall M, Thomas S, and Reynolds C. Reducing Preventable Hospitalization and Disparity: Association with LHD Mental Health Promotion Activities. American Journal of Preventive Medicine. In Press.

Chen J, Vargas-Bustamante A, Novak P. Reducing Young Adults’ Health Care Spending through the ACA Expansion of Dependents’ Coverage. Health Services Research In Press.

Novak P, Williams K, Chen J. Racial and Ethnic Disparities among the Remaining Uninsured Young Adults after The ACA Expansion of Dependent Coverage. Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities In Press.

Cook BL, Zuvekas SH, Chen J, Progovac A, Lincoln AK. Assessing the Individual, Neighborhood, and Policy Predictors of Disparities in Mental Health Care. Medical Care Research and Review 2016 May.

Ali M, Chen J, Mutter R, Novak P, Mortensen K. The ACA's Dependent Coverage Expansion and Out-of-Pocket Spending by Young Adults with Behavioral Health Conditions. Psychiatric Services 2016 May 16.

Chen J, Vargas-Bustamante A, Mortensen K, Ortega A. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care Access and Utilization under the Affordable Care Act. Medical Care 2016; 54(2):140-146.

Ammerman R, Chen J, Mallow P, Rizzo J, Folger A, Van Ginkel J. Annual Direct Health Care Expenditures and Employee Absenteeism Costs in High-Risk, Low-Income Mothers with Major Depression. Journal of Affective Disorders 2016; 190:386-394.

Kim T, Dagher R, Chen J. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Unintended Pregnancy: Evidence from a National Sample of U.S. Women. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 2016; 50:427-435.

Chen J, Mullins D, Novak P, Thomas S. Personalized Strategies to Activate and Empower Patients in Health Care and Reduce Health Disparities. Health Education & Behavior 2016; 43(1): 25-34.

Chen J, O’Brien M, Mennis J, Alos V, Grande D, Roby DH, Ortega AN. Latino Population Growth and Hospital Uncompensated Care Cost. American Journal of Public Health 2015; 105:1710-1717.

Chen J, Vargas-Bustamante A, Tom S. Health Care Spending and Utilization by Race/Ethnicity under the Affordable Care Act’s Dependent Coverage Expansion. American Journal of Public Health 2015; 105:S499-507.

Tilert T, Chen J. Smoking-Cessation Advice to Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 2015; 48(6):683-693.

Holden C, Chen J, Dagher R. Preventive Care Utilization among the Uninsured by Race/Ethnicity and Family Income.  American Journal of Preventive Medicine 2015; 48(1):13-21.

King C, Chen J, Dagher R, Holt C, Thomas S. Decomposing Differences in Medical Care Access among Cancer Survivors by Race and Ethnicity. American Journal of Medical Quality 2015; 30(5):459-469.

Chen J, Mortensen K, Bloodworth R. Exploring Contextual Factors and Patient Activation: Evidence from a Nationally Representative Sample of Patients with Depression.  Health Education & Behavior 2014; 41(6): 614-624.

Bustamante A, Chen J. The Great Recession and Health Spending among Uninsured U.S. Immigrants: Implications for the Affordable Care Act. Health Services Research 2014; 49(6):1900-1924.

Mortensen K, Perman C, Chen J. Innovative Payment Mechanisms in Maryland Hospitals: An Empirical Analysis of Readmissions under Total Patient Revenue.  Health Care: The Journal of Delivery Science and Innovation 2014; 2(3):177-183.

King C, Chen J, Garza M, Thomas S.  Breast and Cervical Screening by Race/Ethnicity: Comparative Analyses before and during the Great Recession. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 2014; 46(4): 359-367.

Chen J, Vargas-Bustamante A, Mortensen K, Thomas S. Using Quantile Regression to Examine Health Care Expenditures during the Great Recession. Health Services Research 2014; 49(2): 705-730.

Chen J, Vargas-Bustamante A, Ortega A. Health Care Expenditures among Asian Americans. Medical Care Research and Review 2013; 70(3): 310-339.

Mortensen K, Chen J. The Great Recession and Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Services Utilization. JAMA Internal Medicine 2013; 173(4): 315-317.

Vargas-Bustamante A, Chen J.   Health Expenditure Dynamics and Years of U.S. Residence: Analyzing Spending Disparities among Latinos by Citizenship/Nativity Status.  Health Services Research 2012; 47 (2): 794-818.

Rodriguez H, Chen J, Edusei K, Suh A, Bekemeier B.  Local Public Health System Influences on the Incidence of Sexually Transmitted Diseases.  American Journal of Public Health 2012; 9 (102): 1773–1781.

Chen J, Rizzo J.  Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Antidepressant Drug Use.  Journal of Mental Health Policy and Economics 2008; 11:155-165.

Chen J, Fang H, Vargas-Bustamante A, Rizzo J, Ortega AN.  Latino Disparities in Prescription Drug Use and Expenditures: A Nationally Representative Analysis. The Annals of Pharmacotherapy 2010; 44: 57-69.

Chen J, Rizzo J.  Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Psychotherapy Services--Evidence from U.S. National Survey Data. Psychiatric Services 2010; 61: 364-372. 

Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1304
Phone: (301) 405-1083 |
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1304
Phone: (301) 405-1083 |
Assistant Director of Finance, Kinesiology
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health


Other Affiliations: SPH
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health

Assistant Director, Public Health Science
Other Affiliations: Public Health Science at College Park
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health
Phone: (301) 405-5436 |

An alumna of the University of Maryland School of Public Health, Kristin completed both her BS and MA in Kinesiology. For her Master's degree, Kristin investigated the effects of physical activity on brain development. Having a passion for promoting the benefits of physical activity for physical and mental well-being, Kristin then began working at the Society of Health and Physical Educators, SHAPE America. As Research Manager, Kristin directed and advised the research initiatives of the organization.  

Now returned to College Park, Kristin’s responsibilities as Assistant Director include developing and establishing the Public Health Science Program, coordinating collaboration and academic efforts between programs at College Park and Shady Grove and advising and recruiting students.

Professor, Kinesiology
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2379
Phone: (301) 405-2452 |
Laboratory Website: 
Motor Development Research Group
Biography

Dr. Jane E. Clark served as dean of the University of Maryland School of Public Health from July 2012 until December 2016. Dean Clark’s passion is to help children achieve the competence and confidence to be physically active throughout their lives. With physical inactivity a leading cause of premature death, engagement in physical activity is viewed as an important goal across the life course. In particular, Dr. Clark’s research focuses on development of motor skills in infants and young children, with a special focus on those with movement difficulties. Clark has edited seven books, written over a hundred papers, and presented hundreds of professional papers at conferences and universities here and abroad. The National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation have funded her research. Currently, she is on the editorial board of Research in Developmental Disabilities and Frontiers In Movement Science and Sport Psychology and is the founding editor of Kinesiology Review. She has received national recognition for her research and service having served as elected leader of three national organizations.

Education and Training

Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Kinesiology (Motor Development)
1976

M. Ed.
University of Washington, Seattle.
Physical Education.
1970

B. S. P. E.
State University of New York, Brockport.
Health & Physical Education. Cum Laude
1968

Honors and Awards

2013 Honorary Degree, Doctor of Science, State University of New York
2013 NASPSPA Distinguished Scholar
2010 University of Wisconsin School of Education, Alumni Achievement Award
2008 Hall of Heritage Award, Brockport Alumni Association, SUNY Brockport
2007 Alliance Scholar, American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation & Dance
2007 University of Maryland Undergraduate Research Mentor of the Year
2004-05 Phillip Merrill Presidential Scholar Mentor to Annie Wong, recipient
1999 NASPSPA President's Award
1999 NASPSPA Senior Scholar Lecturer
1999 Illinois State University Physical Education Scholar Lecturer
1999 Jerry P. Wrenn Outstanding Service Award, College of HHP
1995 McCloy Lecturer, AAHPERD Research Consortium
1995 EDA Scholar, Eastern District Association of AAHPERD
1994 Slaughter Lecturer, University of Virginia, Charlottesville
1994 D'Agostino Lecturer, Distinguished Alumni, SUNY- Brockport
1993 Distinguished Service Award, Research Consortium, AAHPERD
1993 Elected Fellow, American Academy of Kinesiology and Physical Education (#348)
1988 Outstanding Teacher - College Division, American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, Eastern Division
1985 Fellow, Research Consortium, American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance

Publications: 

Kagerer, F. A., & Clark, J. E. (2014). Development of interactions between sensorimotor representations in school-aged children. Human Movement Science, 34, 164–177. doi:10.1016/j.humov.2014.02.001

Pangelinan, M. M., Hatfield, B. D., & Clark, J. E. (2013). Differences in movement-related cortical activation patterns underlying motor performance in children with and without developmental coordination disorder. Journal of Neurophysiology, 109(12), 3041–3050. doi:10.1152/jn.00532.2012

Bair, W.-N., Kiemel, T., Jeka, J. J., & Clark, J. E. (2012). Development of Multisensory Reweighting Is Impaired for Quiet Stance Control in Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). PLoS ONE, 7(7), e40932. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0040932.t001

King, B.R., Clark, J.E., Oliveira, M.A. (2012). Developmental delay of finger torque control in children with developmental coordination disorderDevelopmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 54, 932-937.

King, B. R., Oliveira, M. A., Contreras-Vidal, J. L., & Clark, J. E. (2012). Development of state estimation explains improvements in sensorimotor performance across childhood. Journal ofNeurophysiology, 107(11), 3040–3049. doi:10.1152/jn.00932.2011

Pangelinan, M.M., Kagerer, F.A., Momen, B., Hatfield, B.D., & Clark, J.E. (2011). Electrocortical dynamics reflect age-related differences in movement kinematics in children and adults. Cerebral Cortex, 21, 737-747. PMCID: PMC3059890

King, B.R. Harring, J., Oliveira, M.A., & Clark, J.E. (2011).  Statistically characterizing intra- and inter-individual variability in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 32, 1388-1398.

Pangelinan, M.M., Zhang, G., VanMeter, J.W., Clark, J.E., Hatfield, B.D., & Haufler, A.J. (2011). Beyond age and gender: Relationships between cortical and subcortical brain volume and cognitive-motor ability in school-age children. NeuroImage, 54, 3093-3100. PMCID: PMC3020257

Roche, R., Wilms-Floet, A.M., Clark, J.E., & Whitall, J. (2011). Auditory and visual information do not affect self-paced bilateral finger tapping in children with DCD. Human Movement Science, 30, 658-671.

Bair, W.N., Barela, J.A., Whitall, J., Jeka, J.J., & Clark, J.E. (2011). Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder benefit from using vision in combination with touch information for quiet standing. Gait & Posture, 34, 183-190. PMCID: PMC3130081

King, B.R., Kagerer, F.A., Harring, J.R., Contreras-Vidal, J.L., & Clark, J.E. (2011).  Multisensory adaptation of spatial-to-motor transformations in children with developmental coordination disorder. Experimental Brain Research, 212, 257-265. PMID:21584627

 

 

Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1242Y
Phone: (301) 405-8624 |
Biography

Research Focus

  • Characterization of manipulated tobacco products, such as menthol cigarettes and cigarettes with variation in smoke pH
  • Characterization and abuse liability assessment of alternative nicotine/tobacco products, such as hookah (water pipe), electronic nicotine delivery devices (e-cigarettes) and smokeless tobacco (snus)
Education and Training

Ph.D., Epidemiology, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, December 1993 
M.S.P.H., Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of South Florida, December 1990
B.S.N., Nursing, University of South Florida, December 1988

Career Highlights

Research Professor, Department of Behavioral and Community Health 2008-present
Health Research Leader, Battelle Centers for Public Health Research and Evaluation 1998 - 2007
Associate Professor of Epidemiology, Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine 1994 - 1998
Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiology), University of South Florida College of Medicine 1993 - 1994

Courses

HLTH 301: Epidemiology for Public Health Practice

Honors and Awards

Recent Grants (within last 7 years)

National Institute on Drug Abuse, Abuse liability assessment and characterization of an electronic nicotine delivery system (e-cigarette), Principal Investigator

National Cancer Institute, Standardization of methods to measure waterpipe smoke emissions and exposures, Principal Investigator

National Institute on Drug Abuse, Physiologic impact of variation in smoke pH, Principal Investigator

National Cancer Institute, Smokers and PREPs: Measurement of inhaled and exhaled tobacco smoke particulate, Investigator

National Cancer Institute, Effect of true puff profile replication on machine-generated smoke constituents, Investigator

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Human smoking behavior study, Investigator

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Menthol cross-over study, Task Leader (Principal Investigator)

National Cancer Institute, Initiative on the study and implementation of systems (ISIS), Task Leader (Principal Investigator)

National Cancer Institute, Business practices and minors' access to tobacco, Principal Investigator

National Cancer Institute, Community surveillance of novel tobacco products, Principal Investigator

Publications: 

Clark PI, Babu S, Sharma E. Menthol Cigarettes. What do we know? Report to the World Health Organization, Study Group on Tobacco Product Regulation (TobReg), November 2008. 

Clark PI and Djordjevic MJ. The Role of Smoking Topography in Assessing Human Smoking and its Utility for Informing Machine-Smoking Protocols. Report to the World Health Organization, Scientific Advisory Committee on Tobacco Regulation (WHO SACTob), September 2003.

Gardiner P & Clark PI. Menthol cigarettes: Moving toward a broader definition of harm. Nicotine and Tobacco Research 12:S85-93 (2010). 

Leischow SJ, Luke DA, Mueller N, Harris JK, Ponder P, Marcus S, Clark PI. Mapping U.S. government tobacco control leadership: networked for success? Nicotine & Tobacco Research 12:888-94 (2010). 

Rogers JD, Biener L, Clark PI. Test marketing of new smokeless tobacco products in four US cities. Nicotine & Tobacco Research 12:69-72 (2010). 

Kim H, Clark PI. Cigarette smoking transition in females of low socioeconomic status: Impact of state, school and individual factors. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health 2006;60(suppl_2):ii13-ii19. 

Clark PI, Schooley MW, Pierce B, Schulman J, Hartman AM, Schmitt CL. Impact of home smoking rules on smoking patterns among adolescents and young adults. Prev Chronic Dis [serial online] 2006 Available from: URL: http://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2006/apr/05_0028.htm.

Hatsukami DK, Giovino GA, Eissenberg T, Clark PI, Lawrence D, Leischow S. Methods to assess potential reduced exposure products. Nicotine & Tobacco Research 2005;7:827-844.

Clark PI, Gardiner PS, Djordjevic MV, Leischow SJ, and Robinson RG. Menthol cigarettes: Setting the research agenda. Nicotine & Tobacco Research 2004;6:S5-S9.

Feighery EC, Ribisl KM, Schleicher N, and Clark PI. Retailer participation in cigarette company incentive programs is related to increased levels of cigarette advertising and cheaper cigarette prices in stores. Prev Medicine 2004;38:876-884. 

Feighery EC, Ribisl KM, Clark PI, and Haladjian HH. How the tobacco companies ensure prime placement of their advertising and products in stores: Interviews with retailers about tobacco company incentive programs. Tobacco Control 2003;12:184-188.

Trochim WMK, Stillman FA, Clark PI, and Schmitt CL. Development of a model of the tobacco industry's interference with tobacco control programs. Tobacco Control 2003;12:140-147.

David H. Clarke
Professor Emeritus, Kinesiology
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health
Phone: (301) 405-2450 |
Education and Training

B.S., Springfield College, 1952; M.S., 1953
Ph.D., University of Oregon, 1959

Postdoctoral Associate, Family Science
Building: School of Public Health
Phone: (301)405-3672 |
CV / Resume
PDF icon Erica Coates CV.pdf
Biography

Dr. Coates is a 2017 Postdoctoral Fellow in the Family Science department as part of UMD’s Presidential Postdoc Fellow program. She received her B.S. in psychology from the University of Central Missouri and graduated summa cum laude. She earned both her M.A. and Ph.D. in clinical psychology at the University of South Florida. Her dissertation was entitled "Nonresident Paternal Factors and the Psychosocial Adjustment of Black Adolescents from Single-Mother Households." Most recently, Dr. Coates worked as a Child Outpatient Intern with the VA Maryland Health Care System at the University of Maryland Medical Center. Her recent research focuses on fatherhood, with a particular interest in father-infant relationships and perceptions of fatherhood in the black community. She will be assisting both Associate Professor Kevin Roy and Associate Professor Mia Smith-Bynum with their research on fatherhood and black families.

Distinguished University Professor, Applied Environmental Health (MIAEH)
Affiliate Professor
Campus: UMD | Building: Biomolecular Sciences Building
Phone: 301.405.9550 |
Website: 
Rita Colwell bio- UMIACS
Biography

Rita Colwell is a Distinguished University Professor both at the University of Maryland at College Park and at Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, senior advisor and chairman emeritus at Canon US Life Sciences, Inc., and president and CEO of CosmosID, Inc.

Her research interests are focused on global infectious diseases, water, and health. Colwell is currently developing an international network to address emerging infectious diseases and water issues, including safe drinking water for both the developed and developing world.

Colwell served as the eleventh director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) from 1998 to 2004. In her capacity as NSF director, she served as co-chair of the Committee on Science of the National Science and Technology Council.

One of Colwell's major interests is K-12 science and mathematics education, graduate science and engineering education, and the increased participation of women and minorities in science and engineering.

She has held many advisory positions in the U.S. government, nonprofit science policy organizations, and private foundations, as well as in the international scientific research community. Colwell is a nationally-respected scientist and educator, and has authored or co-authored 17 books and more than 750 scientific publications. She produced the award-winning film, "Invisible Seas," and has served on editorial boards of numerous scientific journals.

Before joining NSF, Colwell was president of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute and a professor of microbiology and biotechnology. She was also a member of the National Science Board from 1984 to 1990.

Colwell has previously served as chairman of the Board of Governors of the American Academy of Microbiology, as well as president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Washington Academy of Sciences, the American Society for Microbiology, the Sigma Xi National Science Honorary Society, and the International Union of Microbiological Societies. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, the Royal Society of Canada, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. She is immediate past-president of the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS).

Colwell has been awarded 55 honorary degrees from institutions of higher education, including her alma mater, Purdue University. She is the recipient of the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold and Silver Star, bestowed by the Emperor of Japan; the 2006 National Medal of Science, awarded by the President of the United States; and the 2010 Stockholm Water Prize, awarded by the King of Sweden.

Colwell is an honorary member of the microbiological societies of the UK, Australia, France, Israel, Bangladesh, Czechoslovakia, Royal Irish Academy and the U.S. She has held several honorary professorships, including the University of Queensland, Australia. A geological site in Antarctica, called Colwell Massif, has been named in recognition of her work in the polar regions.

Education and Training

Ph.D., Oceanography, University of Washington

M.S., Genetics, Purdue University

B.S., Bacteriology, Purdue University 

Adjunct Professor, Public Health Science
Campus: Off Campus | Building:

Biography

Lynn Crawford Cook is a health communicator whose career spans more than 30 years in journalism, public affairs, health education, and academia. Her work has been published in both the lay and academic press. At the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, she was a science writer and an associate director of public affairs. In 2008, she served as managing editor of the peer-reviewed journal, Cases in Public Health Communication & Marketing. As a Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES), she has conducted health communication campaigns at the Federal, state, and local levels. Her areas of expertise are tobacco control and emergency preparedness. She taught Health Communication and Media Advocacy at The George Washington University, and has taught at the Universities at Shady Grove since 2011. 

Assistant Research Professor, Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Other Affiliations: Public Health Science
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1242E
Phone: (301) 405-0560 |
Office Hours: 

Wednesday 2:00-4:00 or by setting an appointment via email.

CV / Resume
PDF icon RaulCruz-Cano_CV.pdf
Biography

Dr. Cruz-Cano has a M.S. in Statistics and a Ph.D. in Computer Engineering from the University of Texas at El Paso. He is currently Assistant Research Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics of the University of Maryland, College Park. His research interests include Computational Statistics, Computational Intelligence, Data analysis and Bioinformatics. He has served in diverse elected positions of the IEEE EMBS NoVA region. He is member of the Eta Kappa Nu and the Tau Beta Pi Honor Societies.

Education and Training

Ph.D. in Computer Engineering, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso (January 2002 - May 2005)

Master Degree in Statistics, Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Texas at El Paso (January 2000- January 2002)

Bachelors Degree in Computer Systems Engineering, College of Engineering, Autonomous University of Chihuahua (August 1995- December 1999)         

Courses

Undergraduate Course:

EPIB 300: Biostatistics for Public Health Practice (Syllabus)

Graduate Courses:

EPIB 663: SAS Programming (previously EPIB 698E) (Syllabus)

EPIB 650: Biostatistics I Online (Syllabus)

EPIB 697: Public Health Data Managment (Syllabus)

HLTH 653: Quantitative Research Methods II in Public Health (Syllabus)

Honors and Awards

2009     Inducted to Eta Kappa Nu, the Honor Society for Electrical and Computer Engineers

2005     Inducted to Tau Beta Pi, the Honor Society for Engineers

Publications: 

E. Mead, R. Cruz-Cano, D. Bernat, L. Whitsel, J. Huang, F. Chaloupka, C. Sherwin, R.M. Robertson. “Association between Florida's Smoke-Free Policy and Acute Myocardial Infarction by Race: A Time Series Analysis, 2000-2013”, Preventive Medicine, Volume 92, pages 169-175, November 2016, DOI:10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.05.032.

K.S. Shaw, R. Cruz-Cano, C. Jiang; L. Mayalil, D. Blythe, P. Ryan, A.R. Sapkota, “Presence of Animal Feeding Operations and Community Socioeconomic Factors Impact Salmonellosis Incidence Rates: Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet), 2004-2010”, Environmental Research, Vol. 150, pages 166–172, October 2016.

R.E. Rosenberg-Goldstein, R. Cruz-Cano, C. Jiang, A. Palmer, D. Blythe, P. Ryan, B. Hogan, B. White, J.R. Dunn, T. Libby, M. Tobin-D’Angelo, J. Huang, S. McGuire, K. Scherzinger, M.-L. T. Lee, A. R. Sapkota, “Association between Community Socioeconomic Factors, Animal Feeding Operations, and Campylobacteriosis Incidence Rates: Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet), 2004-2010”, BMC Infectious Diseases, Volume 16:354, July 2016, DOI: 10.1186/s12879-016-1686-9.

G.A. Buzzell, B. Das, R. Cruz-Cano, L.E. Nkongho, A.W. Kidanu, H. Kim, P.I. Clark, C.G. McDonald. “Using Electrophysiological Measures to Assess the Consumer Acceptability of Smokeless Tobacco Products”, February 2016, Nicotine & Tobacco Research, published ahead of print February 2016, DOI: 10.1093/ntr/ntw041.

A.R. Sapkota, E.L. Kinney, A. George, R.M. Hulet, R. Cruz-Cano, K.J. Schwab, G. Zhang, S.W. Joseph, “Lower Prevalence of Antibiotic-resistant Salmonella on Large-Scale U.S. Conventional Poultry Farms that Transitioned to Organic Practices”, Science of the Total Environment,  Volumes 476–477, pages 387–392, April 2014.

R. Cruz-Cano and M.-L.T. Lee, “Fast Regularized Canonical Correlation Analysis”, Computational Statistics and Data Analysis, Volume 70, pages 88–100, 2014.

B.Z. Pasturel, R. Cruz-Cano, R.E. Rosenberg Goldstein, A. Palmer, D. Blythe, P. Ryan, B. Hogan, C. Jung, S.W. Joseph, M.Q. Wang, M.L.T. Lee, R. Puett, S. Wilson, and A.R. Sapkota, “Community Socioeconomic Factors and Proximity to Animal Operations Influences the Risk of Campylobacteriosis in Maryland”, American Journal of Public Health, e1–e9. DOI:10.2105/AJPH.2013.301338.

J.C. Briones, B. Flores and R. Cruz-Cano, “Multi-Mode Radar Target Detection and Recognition using Neural Networks”, International Journal of Advanced Robotics Systems, 2012, Vol. 9, 177:2012, DOI: 10.5772/52073.

R. Cruz-Cano, M.-L.T. Lee and M.Y. Leung, “Logic Minimization and Rule Extraction for Identification of Functional Sites in Molecular Sequences”, BioData Mining, Vol. 5, Issue 10, August 2012, DOI:10.1186/1756-0381-5-10.

R. Cruz-Cano, M.Y. Leung, K.P. Choi and D. Chew, “Least-Squares Support Vector Machine Approach to Viral Replication Origin Prediction”, INFORMS Journal of Computing, Vol. 22, No. 3, Summer 2010, pages 457-470, DOI:10.1287/ijoc.1090.0360.

Barbara Curbow
Professor and Chair, Behavioral and Community Health
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2387 E
Phone: (301)405-8783 |
Office Hours: 

To make an appointment, please email Tracy Kennedy, kennedyt@umd.edu

 

Biography

Barbara Curbow, PhD, MA, BA is a social/health psychologist who received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Santa Cruz.  From 1987-2005 she was on the faculty at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health where she held appointments in the Departments of Health Policy and Management, Environmental Health Sciences, and Health, Behavior and Society.  From 2006-2014 she was professor and chair of the Department of Behavioral Science and Community Health at the University of Florida College of Public Health and Health Professions.  Currently, Dr. Curbow is professor and chair of the Department of Behavioral and Community Health in the School of Public Health at the University of Maryland.  Dr. Curbow’s research interests fall within these general areas:  cancer prevention and control, medical treatment decision making, health disparities, and health communication.  Over the course of her career she has trained over 30 doctoral advisees.

Education and Training

BA: Political Science, University of California Santa Barbara

MA: Educational Psychology, University of California Santa Barbara

PhD: Social Psychology, University of California Santa Cruz

Postdoctoral fellowship: Social Ecology, University of California Irvine

Courses

HLTH 325 Poor in America: Health and Well-being

Publications: 

Nightingale, CL, Pereira, DB, Curbow, BA, Wingard, JR, Carnaby, GD.(in press)  Prospective Biopsychosocial Investigation into Head and Neck Cancer Caregiving. Biological Research for Nursing.

Nguyen, J, Moorhouse, M, Curbow, B, Christie, J, Walsh-Childers, K, & Islam, S (2016) Construct validity of the eHealth Literacy Scale among two adult populations: A Rasch Analysis. JMIR Public Health and Surveillance.  May 20;2(1):e24.

Nightingale, CL, Pereira, DB, Curbow, BA, Wingard, JR, Carnaby, GD  (2016). Burden, quality of life, and social support in caregivers of patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer: a pilot study. Chronic Illness.

King-Marshall, EC; Mueller, N, Dailey, AB, Barnett, TE, George, TD, Jr, Sultan, S &  Curbow, B. (2015) “It’s just another test they want to do”: Patient and Caregiver Understanding of the Colonoscopy Procedure. Patient Education & Counseling, 99, 651-658.

Soule, EK, Barnett, TE, Curbow, BA, Moorhouse, MD, & Weiler, RM (2015). Hookah and alcohol use among young adult hookah smokers: a mixed methods study. American Journal of Health Behavior, 39, 665-673.

Curbow, BA, Dailey, A, King-Marshall, EC, Barnett, TE, Schumacher, J, Sultan, S, & George, TJ, Jr. (2015). Pathways to colonoscopy in the South: Seeds of health disparities. American Journal of Public Health. Published online March 2015.

King, J. L., Pomeranz, J. L., Barnett, T. E., King-Marshall, E., Nguyen, J., & Curbow, B. (2015). Poor health among smokers obtaining colonoscopy screening: Making the case for cessation intervention. Public Health. Published online March 11, 2015.

Barnett, TE, Forrest, J, Porter, L, & Curbow, BA (2014). A multi-year assessment  of hookah use prevalence among Florida high school students. Nicotine & Tobacco Research, 16, 373-377.

Nightingale, CL, Pomeranz, J, Carnaby, G, & Curbow, B (2014). Quality of life considerations for life care planning. The Rehabilitation Professional, 22 (133-139).

Polanco, Y, Salazar, JC, & Curbow, B (2014). A quantitative analysis of Columbian campesinos’ use of pesticides: perceived control and confidence in this use. Rev. Fac. Nac. Salud Pùblica, 32, 373-382.

 

 

Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2234GG
Phone: (301) 405-7065 |
Office Hours: 

Contact via email to schedule an appointment.

CV / Resume
PDF icon DallalCher_SPH_CV_Nov2016.pdf
Biography

Dr. Dallal’s research focuses on the evaluation of lifestyle and hormonal factors as they relate to estrogen-mediated carcinogenesis of the breast, endometrium and ovary.  Her research centers on the following key areas:  endogenous sex steroids with an emphasis on estrogen metabolism; active and sedentary behavior, obesity, and obesity-derived hormones; and, interrelationships between hormones, obesity, physical activity, and cancer risk.  In addition to exploring health behaviors, their interaction with biology and potential role in cancer prevention, Dr. Dallal is interested in understanding racial/ethnic disparities in cancer incidence and survival.

Education and Training

Cancer Prevention Fellow, National Cancer Institute (post-doctoral training)

Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh (Epidemiology)

M.S.  University of Southern California (Applied Biostatistics and Epidemiology)

M.P.H. Yale University (Chronic Disease Epidemiology)

B.A. University of California at Berkeley (Molecular and Cell Biology)

Courses

EPIB 611: Intermediate Epidemiology (Syllabus)

EPIB 626: Epidemiology of Obesity (Syllabus)

EPIB 631: Cancer Epidemiology (Syllabus)

 

Honors and Awards

American Cancer Society Mentored Research Scholar Grant
Biobehavioral Mechanisms of Breast Cancer Racial Disparities (2017-2021)

NIH Loan Repayment Program, National Institute on MInority Health and Health Disparities (2017-2019)

NIH Fellows Award for Research Excellence (2011, 2012)
NIH/NCI Funding Award to Advance Research on Cancers in Women (2011)

Publications: 

Dallal CM, Brinton LA, Matthews CE, Pfeiffer R, Hartman T, Lissowska J, Falk R, Garcia Closas M, Xu X, Veenstra TD, Gierach GL.  Is accelerometer-measured physical activity and sedentary behavior associated with urinary estrogens and estrogen metabolites among postmenopausal women? Med Sci Sports Exerc 2016; 48(3):  439-48.  E-pub Oct 12, 2015.

Dallal CM, Tice JA, Buist DSM, Bauer DC, Lacey JV, Cauley JA, Hue TF, LaCroix A, Falk RT, Pfeiffer R, Fuhrman B, Veenstra TD, Xu X, Brinton LA.  Estrogen metabolism and postmenopausal breast cancer risk in the B~FIT cohort. Carcinogenesis 2014; 35(2):  346-55.  PMCID:  PMC3908751

Luhn P, Dallal CM, Weiss J, Black A, Huang W, Lacey JV, Hayes RB, Stanczyk FZ, Wentzensen N, Brinton LA.  Circulating adipokines and endometrial cancer risk in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) cancer screening trial.  Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2013; 22(7):  1304-12.  PMCID:  PMC3819202

Dallal CM, Brinton LA, Bauer DC, Buist DSM, Cauley JA, Hue TF, LaCroix A, Tice JA, Chia VM, Falk RT, Pfeiffer R, Pollak M, Veenstra TD, Xu X, Lacey JV.  Obesity-related hormones and endometrial cancer among postmenopausal women:  a nested case-control study within the B~FIT Cohort.  Endocr Relat Cancer 2013; 20(1):  151-160.

Dallal CM, Brinton LA, Matthews CE, Lissowksa J, Peplonska B, Hartman TJ , Gierach GL.  Accelerometer-based measures of active and sedentary behavior in relation to breast cancer risk.  Breast Cancer Res Treat 2012; 134(3):  1279-90.  PMCID:  PMC3534981

Dallal CM, Sullivan-Halley J, Ross RK, Wang Y, Deapen D, Horn-Ross PL, Reynolds P, Stram DO, Clarke CA, Anton-Culver H, Ziogas A, Peel D, West DW, Wright W, and Bernstein L. Long-term recreational physical activity and risk of invasive and in situ breast cancer: the California Teachers Study.  Arch Intern Med 2007; 167(4):  408-15.

Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2387
Phone: (301) 405-3727 |
Lecturer, Public Health Science
Assistant Clinical Professor
Other Affiliations: Applied Environmental Health (MIAEH), Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2328
Phone: (301) 405-2441 |
Website: 
Twitter
CV / Resume
PDF icon CV.pdf
Biography

Gretchen De Silva, Ph.D., M.P.H. is a lecturer and advisor for the Public Health Science program. She has an additional appointment as assistant clinical professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics. Dr. De Silva received her Ph.D. in virology from the Johns Hopkins University as part of a joint program with the National Institutes of Health, where she conducted her research. She focused on examining the molecular mechanisms of cell entry for the vaccina virus and developing immunologic tools for blocking that entry. For her postdoctoral work she completed an M.P.H. in infectious disease epidemiology at Columbia’s Mailman School of Public Health and worked closely with the International Center for AIDS Care and Treatments Programs in Kenya. Her research focused on reasons why patients with HIV drop out of treatment and analysis of a program for tracing such patients.

In spring of 2016 Dr. De Silva initiated the founding of the College Park chapter of Students Engaged in Public Health (SEIPH) and now serves as its faculty advisor. SEIPH is a Public Health Science student group, which is focused on creating a space for student networking as well as serving the local community.

Education and Training
  • Ph.D. Virology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
  • M.P.H. Epidemiology, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY
Courses
  • EPIB 301: Epidemiology for Public Health Practice
  • MIEH 400: Introduction to Global Health
  • PHSC 415: Essentials of Public Health Biology: The Cell, the Individual, and Disease
  • PHSC 420: Vaccines and Immunology
  • PHSC 497: Public Health Science Capstone
Publications: 

Peer Reviewed Publications

Nelson, G. E., Sisler, J. R., Chandran, D., & Moss, B. (2008). Vaccinia virus entry/fusion complex subunit A28 is a target of neutralizing and protective antibodies. Virology 380(2):394-401 doi: 10.1016/j.virol.2008.08.009

Nelson, G. E., Wagenaar, T. R., & Moss, B. (2008). A conserved sequence within the H2 subunit of the vaccinia virus entry/fusion complex is important for interaction with the A28 subunit and infectivity. Journal of Virology 82:6244-6250 doi: 10.1128/JVI.00434-08

Senkevich, T., Ojeda, S., Townsley, A., Nelson, G. E., & Moss, B. (2005). Poxvirus multiprotein entry-fusion complex. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 102(51), 18572-7 doi: 10.1073/pnas.0509239102

Other Publications

De Silva, G.E. (2015, March 17th) Everything you need to know about measles and vaccinations. Livestrong.com http://www.livestrong.com/blog/everything-need-know-measles-vaccinations/#ixzz4D1uA2zzN

Nelson, G. E. (2010). Effect of an ART Patient Defaulter Tracing Program at an ICAP Supported HIV Clinic. Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY.

 

Bruce Deforge
Associate Professor (Joint Appointment), Behavioral and Community Health
Associate Professor, University of Maryland School of Social Work
Campus: UMB | Building: | Room: 3E13
Phone: (410)706-5612 |
Research Assistant Professor, Kinesiology
Director, MCERT Program in Physical Education
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2351
Phone: (301) 405-2450 |
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2376
Phone: (301) 405-2526 |
Biography

Research Focus

  • Campus-community partnerships for health
  • Minority health
  • Community based participatory research
Education and Training

Ph.D., Health Education, minor in Measurement and Evaluation, University of Toledo, Toledo OH 

MS & Ed, Health Education, University of Toledo, Toledo OH 

BS in Creative Movement Therapy, University of Toledo, Toledo OH

Courses

HLTH 391: Principles of Community Health I 
HLTH 460: Minority Health
HLTH 606: Foundations of Public Health Policy and Education
HLTH 665: Health Behavior I 
HLTH 666: Health Behavior II 
HLTH 780: Community Health

Honors and Awards

Recent Grants (within last 7 years)

Prince George's County Health Department, Needs and Strengths Assessment of Suitland, MD, Principal Investigator

Career Highlights

  • Founding member and co-chairperson of the Seat Pleasant-University of Maryland Health Partnership
  • More than 50 publications in peer-reviewed journals
  • Experienced teaching community service classes
  • Undergraduate and graduate student mentor
Publications: 

Howard, Donna E. , Rao, Chythra R. and Desmond, Sharon M. (2010). Borrowing From the East to Strengthen the West: Merging Public Health Case Studies of Community-Based Service-Learning Practices From India and the United States, Journal of Community Practice, 18: 2, 336 - 360

Atkinson NL, Desmond SM, Saperstein SL, Billing AS, Gold RS, Tournas-Hardt (2010). Assets, Challenges and the Potential of Technology for Nutrition Education in Rural Communities. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, Vol. 42 (6), 410-416.

Atkinson, N.L., Saperstein, S.L., Desmond, S.M., Gold, R.G. Billing, A.S., Tian, J. (2009). Rural eHealth Nutrition Education for Limited-Income Families: An Iterative and User-centered Design Approach. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 11(2):e21. URL:http://www.jmir.org/2009/2/e21/HTML

Galbraith JS, Stanton B, Boekeloo B, Winifred K, Desmond S, Howard D, Black MM and Carey JW (2008). Exploring implementation and fidelity of evidence based behavioral interventions for HIV prevention: Lessons learned from the focus on kids diffusion case study. Health Education and Behavior Vol. 36 (3): 532-549 (June 2009).

Gniesha Dinwiddie, PhD, headshot
Assistant Professor, African American Studies
Affiliate Faculty, Center for Health Equity
Other Affiliations: UMD - Not within SPH, Center for Health Equity
Campus: UMD | Building: LeFrak Hall | Room: 2169
Phone: (301) 405-1158 |
Website: 
http://aasd.umd.edu/facultyprofile/Dinwiddie/Gniesha
Lecturer, Health Services Administration
Leadership and Organizational Development Consultant and Educator
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health

Joanne Dorgan
Professor (Joint Appointment), Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Professor, Dept. of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine
Campus: UMB | Building: HH | Room: 102E

Website: 
University of Maryland School of Medicine profile
Charles Dotson
Professor Emeritus, Kinesiology
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health
Phone: (301) 405-2450 |
Biography

Dr. Dotson's areas of interest include the epidemiology of fitness and health, sports performance statistics, and body composition assessment.

Education and Training

B.A., Morehead State University, 1963
M.S., Purdue University, 1964; Ph.D., 1968

Assistant Professor, Health Services Administration
Campus: UMD | Building: SPH | Room: SPH 3100F
|
Office Hours: 

By appointment

CV / Resume
PDF icon DuGoff-CV-October2017.pdf
Biography

Professor Eva DuGoff is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Services Administration in the University of Maryland School of Public Health. She joins UMD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Population Health Sciences from 2014 to 2017. Professor DuGoff received her PhD from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Health Services Research and Policy. She earned her undergraduate degree from Georgetown University and MPP from George Washington University.

Professor DuGoff’s research focuses primarily on the Medicare population and Medicare Advantage program. She is interested in the policy and organizational determinants of health care quality and health outcomes. Her research aims to identify opportunities for policymakers to improve health care delivery and health outcomes in the United States, especially for older adults with multiple chronic conditions and racial and ethnic minorities.

Professor DuGoff currently serves as the principal investigator on a Commonwealth Fund grant to understand the high needs segments in the Medicare Advantage program.

Courses

HLSA 775 - Public Health Research Methods

Publications: 

DuGoff EH, Stuart EA, Schuler, M. "Generalizing Propensity Score Results: Applying  Matching Methods to Complex Survey Data” Health Services Research 2013 Jul; 48(4): 1227-1550.

DuGoff EH, Dy SM, Giovanetti E, Leff, B, Boyd, CM. "Setting Standards at the Forefront of Delivery System Reform: Aligning Care Coordination Quality Measures for Multiple Chronic Conditions” Journal of Healthcare Quality 2013 Sep;35(5): 58-69.

DuGoff EH, Canudas-Romo V, Buttorff CB, Leff B, Anderson GF. “Multiple Chronic Conditions and Life Expectancy: A Life Table Analysis” Medical Care 2014 Aug;52(8):688-94.

Pollack CE, Blackford AL, Schoenborn NL, Boyd CM, Peairs KS, DuGoff EH. “Comparing prognostic tools for cancer screening: Considerations for clinical practice and performance assessment” Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, May 2016.

DuGoff EH, Bardeen-Roche K, Anderson GF. “Continuity of care and adverse outcomes relationship varies by number of chronic conditions among older adults with diabetes “ Journal of Comorbidity, June 2016;6(2):65-72.

Jung DH*, Palta M, Smith MA, Oliver T, DuGoff EH. “Examining the Impact of Pay for Performance on Health Disparities in the Medicare Advantage Program” Preventing Chronic Disease, 2016 Sep 8;13:E125.

DuGoff EH, Walden E, Ronk K, Palta M, Smith MA. “Can Claims Data Algorithms Identify a Patient’s Physician of Record?” Medical Care. 2017 Mar 21.

Assistant Director, Finance and Administration, Office of the Dean
Campus: UMD | Building: SPH | Room: 2242CC
Phone: (301) 405-2637 |
Assistant Professor, Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Affiliate Faculty, University of Maryland Population Research Center and Prevention Research Center
Other Affiliations: Public Health Science, Center for Health Equity, UMD Prevention Research Center
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2234FF
Phone: (301) 405-8547 |
Office Hours: 

By appointment.

CV / Resume
PDF icon Dyer CV_Fall 2016.pdf
Biography

Typhanye V. Dyer's research interests include exploring social, cultural and structural determinants of infectious disease disparities. Specifically, her research explores HIV/AIDS disparities, sexuality, mental health, and substance use with an emphasis in racial/ethnic and gender disparities among marginalized populations, as well as their families. Her research in HIV/AIDS also examines theory of syndemic production and HIV risk and prevalence among Black men who have sex with men (BMSM) and Black men who have sex with men and women (BMSMW), and how sex and drug risk networks of MSMW translates into risk for their male and female partners. Her research also explores intersections of cultural identity, racial identity, sexual identity and gender identity among Black gay/bisexual men. Dr. Dyer's collaborative research explores HIV-related stigma, engagement and retention in HIV-related care and medication adherence among older Black women living with HIV in Prince George's County, Maryland. Additionally, she is working with colleagues within the School of Public Health at College Park on exposure to partner violence and HIV testing among Black women, as well as feelings about marriageability and substance use and sex risk and STI and HIV infection among college educated Black women. Additional areas of research involve the examination of risk for females with high risk male sex partners and partners who have been incarcerated, exploring social vulnerability including stigma and discrimination that drive risk. Population based research takes an interdisciplinary approach involving social epidemiology, critical race theory and community based participatory research to reduce health disparities. 

Education and Training

Post-Doctoral Training in Drug Dependence and Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 2009-2011

Ph.D. in Public Health, University of California Los Angeles, 2009

M.P.H. in Community Health, California State University Long Beach, 2002

B.A. in Psychology (Neuroscience), University of California Los Angeles, 1995

Courses

Online Courses:

Public Health Concepts (Fall 2012), University of Florida
70 Students

Foundations in Epidemiology (Spring 2014), University of Maryland, eMPH Course

On Ground Courses:

Undergraduate Course:

EPIB 301: Epidemiology for Public Health Practice (Syllabus)

Graduate Courses:

EPIB 610: Foundations in Epidemiology (Syllabus)

EPIB 630: Epidemiology of Sexual and Reproductive Health (Syllabus)

Behavioral Epidemiology (Spring 2016), University of Maryland

Honors and Awards

University of Maryland ADVANCE Keeping Our Faculties (KOF) Program (2014-2015)
Faculty Fellow

University of Maryland ADVANCE Program for Faculty Diversity (2013-2015)
Faculty Fellow

Health Equity Leadership Institute, Collaborative Center for health Equity at The University of Wisconsin-Madison and The Maryland center for Health Equity within the School of Public Health (2013)
Summer Scholar

National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHHD), Health Disparities Loan Repayment Program (2011-2016)

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Family Research Consortium Summer Institute (2011)
Fellow

Black Gay Research Group Travel Scholarship for National AIDS Education & Services for Minorities (2011)

Visiting Scholar, UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute (2011-2013)

HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) ($18,500 Travel and Research Award) (2010-2012)
Scholar

NIDA College for Problems on Drug Dependence (CPDD) Women & Sex/Gender Junior Investigator Travel Award (2010)

HIV/AIDS Translational Training Program, UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience & Human Behavior (2009-2012)
Fellow

T-32 National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Supported Drug Dependence Epidemiology Training Program, Postdoctoral Fellow, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (2009-2011)
Trainee

Who’s Who in America (2009)

UCLA Center for American Politics and Public Policy (2008-2009)
Teaching Fellow

UCLA/RAND Center for Adolescent Health Promotion (2006-2008)
Fellow

Association of Schools for Public Health/ Centers for Disease Control/ Prevention Research Centers (ASPH/CDC/PRC) (2006-2008)
Minority Fellowship Trainee

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Supported AIDS Research Training Grant (2002-2006)
Fellow

Minority Health and Health Disparities International Research Training (MHIRT) Grant, Fogarty International Center (NIH) (2003)
Fellow

Collaborators

Brad Boekeloo, PhD (University of Maryland: Behavioral and Community Health)

Thurka Sangarmoorthy, PhD (University of Maryland: Anthropology)

Maria Khan, PhD (University of Florida, Epidemiology)

Gail E. Wyatt (UCLA Semel Institute)

Steve Shoptaw, PhD (UCLA, Center for Behavioral and Addiction Medicine)

Ron Stall, PhD (University of Pittsburgh, Department of Community and Behavioral Health)

Carl Latkin, PhD (Johns Hopkins, Department of Health, Behavior and Society)

Amy Knowlton, PhD (Johns Hopkins, Department of Health, Behavior and Society)

Publications: 

Nelson, L.E., Wilton, L., Moineddin, R., Zhang, N., Siddiqi, A., Sa, Ting, Harawa, N., Regan, R., Penniman Dyer, T., Watson, C.C., Koblin, B., del Rio, C., Buchbinder, S., Wheeler, D. P., & Mayer, K. H. for the HPTN 061 Study Team. Economic, legal and social hardships associated with HIV risk among Black men who have sex with men in six US Cities. Journal of Urban Health. In Press

Nelson, L. E., Wilton, L., Zhang, N., Thach, C. T., Regan, R., Penniman Dyer, T., Ndoye, O., Kushwaha, S., Sanders, E., & Mayer, K, H. Childhood exposure to religions with high prevalence of members who discourage homosexuality is associated with HIV risk behaviors and HIV infection in adult Black men who have sex with men. American Journal of Men’s Health. In Press. doi:10.1177/1557988315626264.

Williams JK, Wilton L, Magnus M, Wang L, Wand J, Penniman Dyer T, Koblin B, Hucks-Ortiz C, Fields S, Shoptaw S, Stephenson R, O’Cleirigh C, Cummings V, HPTN 061 Study Team. Relation of Childhood Sexual Abuse, Intimate Partner Violence, and Depression to Risk Factors for HIV among Black Men Who Have Sex with Men in 6 US Cities. American Journal of Public Health. 2015: 105(12): 2473-2481. PMID: 26469666

Penniman Dyer T, Khan, M, Sandoval, M, Friedman, S. Substance use and sexual risk among men who have sex with men and women (MSMW) and their female partners. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Volume 176, e271.

Penniman Dyer T, Regan, R, Pacek, L, Acheampong, A, Khan M. Psychosocial Vulnerability and HIV-related Sexual Risk among Men who have Sex with Men and Women (MSMW) in the United States. In Press. Archives of Sexual Behavior

Dunne, E. M., Penniman Dyer, T., Khan, M., Cavanaugh, C., Melnikov, A., & Latimer, W. W. HIV prevalence and risk behaviors among African American women who trade sex for drugs versus economic resources. AIDS and Behavior. 2014: 18(7):1288-92. PMID: 24496649

Keen, L, Penniman Dyer, T, Whitehead, N, Latimer, W. Binge Drinking, Stimulant Use and HIV Risk in a Sample of Heterosexual Black Men. Addictive Behaviors. 2014: 39(9):1342-1345. PMID: 24837758

Harawa N, Gorbach P, Griffith S, Koblin B, Mayer K, Penniman T, Kuo I, Mao L, Wang L, Williams JK, Wilton L. Types of female partners reported by Black men who have sex with men and women (BMSMW) and associations with intercourse frequency, unprotected sex and HIV and STD prevalence. AIDS and Behavior, 2014; 18 (2), 1-7. PMID: 24523006

Penniman Dyer T, Regan R, Wilton, L, Harawa N, Wang L, Ou S, Shoptaw S. Differences in substance use, psychosocial characteristics and HIV-related sexual risk behavior between Black Men Who Have Sex with Men Only (BMSMO) and Black Men Who Have Sex with Men and Women (BMSMW) in 6 US Cities. Journal of Urban Health, 2013; 90(6), 1181-1193. PMCID: PMC3853182

Regan R, Penniman Dyer T, Gooding T, Morisky D. Drug Use and Sexual Risk Behavior among Men Participating in an HIV/AIDS Risk Reduction Intervention in the Philippines. International Journal of STDS and AIDS, 2013; 24(12), 969-976.

Herrick A, Stall R, Chmiel J, Guadamuz T, Penniman T, Shoptaw S, Ostrow D, Plankey M. It Gets Better:  Resolution of Internalized Homophobia over Time and Associations with Positive Health Outcomes among MSM. AIDS and Behavior. 2013; 17(4), 1423-30. PMCID: PMC3708613

Rudolph A, Linton S, Penniman Dyer T, Latkin C. Individual, Network, and Neighborhood correlates of exchange sex among female non-injection drug users in Baltimore, MD (2005-2007). AIDS and  Behavior. 2012; 17(2), 598-611. PMCID:PMC3552090

Khan MR, Berger A, Hemberg J, O’Neill A, Penniman Dyer T, Smyrk, K.  Non-injection and Injection Drug Use and STI/HIV Risk in the United States: The Degree to which Sexual Risk Behaviors versus Sex with an STI-Infected Partner Account for Infection Transmission among Drug Users. AIDS and Behavior. 2013; 17 (3): 1185-1194. PMCID: PMC3923515

Khan MR, Rosen DL, Epperson M, Goldweber A, Hemberg J, Richardson J, Penniman Dyer T. Adolescent Criminal Justice Involvement and Adulthood Sexually Transmitted Infection in a Nationally-Representative US Sample. Journal of Urban Health. 2012; 20 (4) 717-728. PMCID: PMC3732694

Strathdee S, Shoptaw S, Penniman Dyer T, Vu Q, Aramrattana A. Towards Combination HIV Prevention for Injection Drug Users: Addressing Addictophobia, Apathy and Inattention. Current Opinions in HIV and AIDS. 2012; 7 (4): 320-325.  PMCID: PMC3646543

Trenz RC, Penniman TV, Scherer M, Zur J, Rose J, Latimer W. Problem recognition, intention to stop use, and treatment use among regular heroin injectors. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment. 2012; 43 (2): 204-210. PMCID: PMC3412068

Penniman Dyer T, Stein J, Rice E, Rotheram Borus M. Predicting depression in mothers with and without HIV: The role of social support and family dynamics. AIDS and Behavior. 2012; 16:2198-2208. PMCID: PMC3990227

Penniman Dyer T, Shoptaw S, Guadamuz TE, Plankey MW, Kao, U, Ostrow, D, Chmiel, J, Herrick, A, Stall RD. Application of Syndemic Theory to Black Men who Have Sex with Men in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study. Journal of Urban Health. 2012; 89 (4): 697-708. PMCID: PMC3535137

Stockman J, Ludwig-Baron N, Hoffman M, Ulibarri M, Penniman Dyer T. Prevention interventions for human immunodeficiency virus in drug-using women with a history of partner violence. Substance Abuse and Rehabilitation Journal. 2012; 3 (Suppl 1): 45-57. PMCID: PMC3280816

Latkin C, Yang C, Tobin K, Penniman T, Spikes P, Patterson, J.  Differences in the social network characteristics of African American men who have sex with men and those who have sex with men and women. The Unity in Diversity Study, Baltimore, MD. American Journal of Public Health. 2011; 101 (10): e18-e23. PMCID: PMC3222365

Brown QL, Cavanaugh CE, Penniman TV, Latimer, W. The Impact of Homelessness on Recent Sex Trade among Pregnant Women in Drug Treatment. Journal of Substance Use. 2012; 17 (3): 287-293. PMCID: PMC3384543

Stein JA, Bursch B, Rice E, Green S, Penniman T, Rotheram-Borus MJ. Family-Based Processes Associated with Adolescent Distress, Substance Use and Risky Sexual Behavior in Families Affected by Maternal HIV. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. 2010; 39 (3): 328 – 340. PMID: 20419574

Cavanaugh C, Floyd L, Penniman T, Hulbert A, Gaydos C, Latimer W. Examining racial/ethnic STD disparities among recent heroin- and cocaine-using women. Journal of Women's Health. 2011; 20(2): 197-205. PMCID: PMC3064876

Penniman TV, Taylor SL, Bird CE, Beckman R, Collins RL, Cunningham W. The associations of gender, sexual identity and competing needs with healthcare utilization among people with HIV/AIDS. Journal of the National Medical Association. 2007;99(4):419-27. PMCID: PMC2569651

Dr. Samer S. El-Kamary
Associate Professor (Joint Appointment), Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Associate Professor, Dept. of Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine
Campus: UMB | Building: HH | Room: 102B
Phone: (410)706-2228 |
Website: 
University of Maryland School of Medicine profile
Dr. Nancy J Ellish
Associate Professor (Joint Appointment), Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Associate Professor, Dept. of Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine
Campus: UMB | Building: 419 W. Redwood | Room: Suite 479
Phone: (410)328-1350 |
Website: 
University of Maryland School of Medicine profile
Professor, Family Science
Director of the Couple and Family Therapy Program
Other Affiliations: Center for Healthy Families, UMD Prevention Research Center
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1142X School of Public Health
Phone: 301.405.4013 |
Office Hours: 

Monday 1-2, Thursday 1-2, and by appointment. Please contact via email to set up an appointment.

CV / Resume
File Epstein CV February 2016.docx
Biography

Norman B. Epstein, Ph.D. is widely recognized internationally as a leader in the field of couple and family therapy. In particular, he is a pioneer in the development of cognitive-behavioral therapy with couples and families. His research, writing, teaching, and training of clinicians have focused on the role of cognitive processes in relationship adjustment and dysfunction, assessment of intimate relationships, couple and family coping with stress, development and evaluation of treatments for distressed couples and families, anxiety and depression in the relationship context, cross-cultural studies of couple and family relationships, and treatment of psychological and physical aggression in couple relationships. He is an author or editor of four books, including Depression in the Family (1986), Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy with Families (1988), Cognitive-Behavioral Marital Therapy (1990), and Enhanced Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Couples: A Contextual Approach (2002). He currently has a contract to write a book on treatment of aggressive behavior in couple relationships and another for a book on cognitive-behavioral treatment of sexual dysfunction. In addition, he has published 58 journal articles and 56 chapters in edited books on aspects of couple and family relationships and therapy. He currently has a contract to write a book on treatment of aggressive behavior in couple relationships. Dr. Epstein has presented 120 research papers, as well as 88 training workshops on couple and family therapy, at national and international professional meetings. One special focus of his international work has involved seven trips to China to present training seminars and workshops, as well as to collaborate with Chinese colleagues on research and on the development of family therapy training in China. In August, 2012, graduate students from the University of Maryland’s Couple and Family Therapy program traveled with Dr. Epstein to Beijing to participate in the inaugural Sino-American Forum on Marital and Family Therapy. In July, 2013 he presented a three-day training on cognitive-behavioral therapy to school counselors in Shanghai. Dr. Epstein is interested in cultural sensitivity in the practice of couple and family therapy, including the adaptation of Western-derived therapy models for appropriate use in other cultures. He also has collaborated with Korean colleagues in investigating risk and protective factors for adolescent emotional and behavioral problems in Korea. Currently he also is engaged in a 4-year longitudinal study, as part of a larger project with colleagues at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, the Uniformed Services University, and the National Intrepid Center of Excellence, investigating improvements that Service Members with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder experience in their relationships with their family members, as well as in their symptoms, when they engage in training service dogs for placement with physically disabled veterans.

Education and Training

Dr. Epstein earned his Ph.D. in clinical psychology at the University of California at Los Angeles. He received training in cognitive therapy at Dr. Aaron Beck’s Center for Cognitive Therapy at the University of Pennsylvania.

Courses
  • FMSC 431 Family Crises and Intervention
  • FMSC 610 Research Methods in Family Studies
  • FMSC 641 Couples Therapy, Theory, and Techniques
  • FMSC 645 Sexuality: Issues in Family Therapy and Service Delivery
  • FMSC 650 Ethical, Legal, and Professional Principles in Marriage and Family Therapy
  • FMSC 658 Supervised Clinical Practice of Marriage and Family Therapy
  • FMSC 810 Theory in Family Systems and Family Health
Honors and Awards

Dr. Epstein is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, a Clinical Fellow and Approved Supervisor of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, a Founding Fellow of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy, and a Diplomate of the American Board of Assessment Psychology. He has served on the editorial boards of several leading professional journals.

Publications: 

Quach, A., Riley, P.J., Epstein, N.B., Fang, X.Y., & Falconier, M.K. (2013). The relationship of parental warmth, parental pressure for academic achievement, and gender with adolescent depression and anxiety in China. Journal of Child and Family Studies. Doi: 10.1007/s10826-013-9818-y

Chi, P., Epstein, N.B., Fang, X., & Lam, D.O.B. (2013). The similarity of relationship standards, couple communication patterns and marital satisfaction among Chinese couples. Journal of Family Psychology, 27, 806-816.

Park, W. & Epstein, N.B. (2013). The longitudinal causal directionality between body image distress and self-esteem among Korean adolescents: The moderating effect of relationships with parents. Journal of Adolescence, 36, 403-411.

Finkbeiner, N.M., Epstein, N.B., & Falconier, M.K. (2013). Depression, intimacy, and relationship satisfaction in clinical couples. Personal Relationships, 20, 406-421. DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-6811.2012.01415.x

Epstein, N.B., Berger, A.T., Fang, J.J., Messina, L., Smith, J.R., Lloyd, T.D., Fang, X.Y., & Liu, Q.X. (2012). Applying Western-developed family therapy models in China. Journal of Family Psychotherapy, 23, 217-237; DOI: 10.1080/08975353.2012.705661.

Baucom, D.H., Epstein, N.B., & Sullivan, L.J. (2012). Brief couple therapy. In M.J. Dewan, B.N. Steenbarger, & R.P. Greenberg (Eds.), The art and science of brief psychotherapies: An illustrated guide (2nd ed., pp. 239-276). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Publishing.

Hrapczynski, K.M., Epstein, N.B., Werlinich, C.A., & LaTaillade, J.J. (2011). Changes in negative attributions during couple therapy for abusive behavior: Relations to changes in satisfaction and behavior. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 38, 117-132; DOI: 10.1111/j.1752-0606.2011.00264.x

Epstein, N.B., & Falconier, M.K. (2011). Shame in couple therapy. In R. Dearing & J.P. Tangney (Eds.), Shame in the therapy hour. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Baucom, D.H., Epstein, N.B., Kirby, J.S., & Falconier, M.K. (2010). Couple therapy: Theoretical perspectives and empirical findings. In D.H. Barlow (Ed.), Oxford handbook of clinical psychology. New York: Oxford University Press.

Baucom, D.H., Epstein, N.B., Kirby, J.S., & LaTaillade, J.J. (2010). Cognitive-behavioral couple therapy. In K. S. Dobson (Ed.), Handbook of cognitive-behavioral therapies (3rd Ed.), pp. 411-444. New York: Guilford.

Lecturer , Health Services Administration
Other Affiliations: SPH
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health

Website: 
Dr. Farahati's Publications
Office Hours: 

By Appointment

Biography

Dr. Farah Farahati received her Ph.D. in applied microeconomics from Northern Illinois University in 2001 and did her post-doctoral training in health economics at McMaster University in 2005. Currently, she teaches economics, health economics, research methods and healthcare system organization and delivery to the graduate and undergraduate students at the University of Maryland. At the same time, as a senior health economist contractor, she collaborates on multiple federal and governmental research projects. 

Her research interests focus on identifying and quantifying the most cost-effective interventions, strategies and policies that improve lives and save money for the global health care system. She has long-term experience and strong skills in quantitative methods with creative independent research ideas in public health policy. She has presented basic and advanced analytical results to non-economists, in person and in writing, in the U.S. and Canadian health care systems.  Her writing and collaborative skills are indicated by her multiple technical reports and peer-reviewed publications. 

She has held various economist positions throughout her career for different organizations, including the Canadian Agency for Drug and Technologies in Health (CADTH), the Health Affairs journal, and most recently, the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services (HHS), Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR). In her most current study with the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR), she developed an input-output spreadsheet microsimulation model published in Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness for which she received the director's award.

 

Education and Training

2005: Post-Doctoral Fellowship, McMaster University, Department of Economics, Hamilton, ON, Canada
2003: Post-Doctoral Fellowship, National Institute of Mental Health, Centers for Mental Healthcare Research 
            University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, VA Medical Center, North Little Rock, AR         
2001: PhD, Economics:  Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL
            Dissertation Title: Mental Health, Schooling, and Labor Market Outcomes
Available at: https://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/NAHDAP/biblio/resources?q=farahati&...

1994: Master of Arts, Economics:  Western Illinois Macomb, IL 
1988: Bachelor of Arts, Economics:  University of Tehran, Iran 

                                                                                     

 

                                                           

Courses

Health Economics & Analysis HLSA711

Public Health Research HLSA775

Introduction to Health Systems HLSA601

 

 

 

Honors and Awards

April 2016: Director's Award for supporting the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR), Division of Medical Countermeasure Strategy & Requirements (MCSR) team in the development of an economic evaluation for public health emergencies guidebook and leading an innovative thermal burn spillover model project.

March 2003: Certificate of Recognition, National Institute of Mental Health conference, for poster presentation at “Beyond the Clinical Walls,” Washington, DC.

April 2002: Certificate of Recognition, National Institute of Mental Health conference, for oral presentation at “Evidence in Mental Health Services Research,” Washington, DC.

1984-1988: Merit-based Scholarships for Undergraduate Studies, University of Tehran, Iran.

 

 

Publications: 

Peer-Reviewed Publications. At: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=Eqd7K7sAAAAJ&hl=en

  1. Farahati, F and Nystrom, S, David, R., Howell, and Jaffe, R (2016). Economic Spillover Analysis from Public Medical Countermeasure Investments: A Case Study of NexoBrid®. Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness.  Available at:
  1. Walker, H., Anderson, M., Farahati F., Howell, D. S., Librach, L., Husain, A., Sussman, A., Viola, R., Sutradhar, R., & Barbera, L. (2011). Resource Use and Costs of End-of-Life/Palliative Care: Ontario Adult Cancer Patients Dying during 2002 and 2003.  J Palliative Care, 27(2), 79-88. At: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21805942

  2. Wijeysundera H., Machado M., Farahati F., Wang, X., Witteman, W., Van der Velde, G., Tu, J. V., Lee, D. S., Goodman, S. G., Petrella, R., O’Flaherty, M., Krahn, M., & Capewell, S. (2010). Association of Temporal Trends in Risk Factors and Treatment Uptake with Coronary Heart Disease Mortality, 1994-2005. JAMA, 303, 1841-1847. Available at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20460623

  3. Farahati, F., Boucher, M., Moulton, K., Williams, R., Herrmann, N., Silverman, M., & Skidmore, B. (2007). Monotherapy with Atypical Antipsychotic for Schizophrenia: Clinical Review and Economic Evaluation of First Year of Treatment. Ottawa: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health. Value in Health. Volume 11, Issue 3, May–June 2008, Pages A114. Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1098301510703685

  4. Pyne J., Booth B., Farahati F., Tripathi S., Smith R., & Marques P. (2006). Preference-weighted Health Status Associated with Substance Use Disorders Treatment. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 67, 436-44. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3076048/

  5. Goeree, R., Farahati, F., Burke, R., Blackhouse, G., O’Reilly, D., Pyne, J., & Tarride, J. (2005). The Economic Burden of Schizophrenia in Canada in 2004. Current Medical Research and Opinion, 21(12), 2017-2028. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16368053

  6. Pyne, J., Rost, C., Farahati, F., Tripathi, S., Smith, R., Williams, K., Fortney, J., & Coyne, J. (2004). One Size Fits Some: The Impact of Patient Treatment Attitudes on the Cost-Effectiveness of a Depression Primary Care Intervention. Psychological Medicine, 34, 1–16. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15997604

  7. Wilcox-Gök, V., Marcotte, D., Farahati, F., & Borkoski, C. (2004). “Early Onset Depression and High School Dropout,” in Marcotte and Wilcox-Gök ed. 2004, The Economics of Gender and Mental Illness, Research in Human Capital and Development (Elsevier Science), pp. 27-51. Available at: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/books.htm?issn=0194-3960&volume=15

  8. http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1016/S0194-3960%2804%2915001-4

  9. Farahati, F., Marcotte, D., & Wilcox-Gök, V. (2003). Parental Psychiatric Disorders and High School Dropout. Economics of Education Review, 22(2), 167-178. Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272775702000316

  10. Farahati, F and Wilcox-Gök, V. (2003).Mental Health, Schooling, and Labor Market Outcomes. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing (2017-07-27 ). SBN-13: 978-3-330-09022-4. https://www.morebooks.de/store/gb/book/mental-health,-schooling,-and-labor-market-outcomes/isbn/978-3-330-09022-4

​Selected Non-Peer-Reviewed Technical Reports

  1. Farahati, F., Boucher, M., Moulton, K., Williams, R., Herrmann, N., Silverman, M., & Skidmore, B. (2007). Atypical Antipsychotic Monotherapy for Schizophrenia: Clinical Review and Economic Evaluation of First Year of Treatment. Ottawa: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health. Available at: https://www.cadth.ca/media/pdf/267_Antipsychotics_tr_e.pdf
  1. Farahati, F. (2010). Productivity Losses of Chronic Diseases in Canadian Labour Force from 1994 to 2005. Statistics Canada. http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/rdchealthconference/day1/program/21/
  2. Bayoumi, A., John-Baptiste, A., Hong Chen, W., Farahati, F., et al. (2008). The Cost-Effectiveness of Prevention Strategies for Pressure Ulcers in Long-Term Care Homes in Ontario. Toronto Health Economics and Technology Assessment (THETA), Univ. of Toronto. At: http://lgdata.s3-website-us-east-1.amazonaws.com/docs/3744/928426/TR_200...
  3. Farahati, F., & Fiander, M. (2007). Disease Burden of Colorectal Cancer and Cost of Colorectal Cancer Screening. Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health: Ottawa. Available at:  http://books1.scholarsportal.info/viewdoc.html?id=378336
  4. Chen, S., Farahati, F., Marciniuk, S., Mayers, K., Boudreau, R., & Keating, M. (2007). Human a1-Proteinase Inhibitor for Patients with a1-Antitrypsin Deficiency. (Technology Report, No 74), HTA, CADTH, Ottawa. Available at: http://www.cadth.ca/en/products/health-technology-assessment/publication...
  5. Farahati, F., & Hurely, J.  (2004). Labor Market Effects Of Insulin Dependent And Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Among Canadian Labor Force. Value in Health, V7, 6, Nov.–Dec. 2004, Pages 648-649. 2004. International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Availalable at: http://ac.els-cdn.com/S1098301510656719/1-s2.0-S1098301510656719-main.pd...
  6. Farahati, F., Marcotte, D., & Wilcox-Gök, V. (2003). Gender Differences in Psychiatric Disorders: Effects on Labor Market Outcomes. Northern IL University Working Paper #2003-13.
  7. Farahati, F., Booth, B. & Wilcox-Gök, V. (2002). Employment Effects of Comorbid Depression and Substance Abuse. Northern IL University Working Paper. Available at: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/267943609_EMPLOYMENT_EFFECTS_OF...

 

Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Affairs, Office of the Dean
Building: School of Public Health
Phone: (301) 405-2473 |

Dr. Colleen (Coke) Farmer received her PhD in exercise physiology from the University of Maryland Department of Kinesiology, an MS in exercise science from Northern Michigan University and a BS in physical education from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Her research focused on the changes in lipid metabolism that occur as a result of chronic exercise. She served in the Peace Corps in the Philippines, and is a dedicated environmentalist and wildlife advocate. Dr. Farmer’s focus is on helping students learn how to change the world a little bit, and lead lives that are interesting, challenging and fun.  

 
Professor, Behavioral and Community Health
Director, Post-Doctoral Program of the TCORS
Other Affiliations: Applied Environmental Health (MIAEH), UMD Prevention Research Center
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2370
Phone: (301) 405-2519 |
Biography

Research Focus

  • Tobacco control
  • Worksite health
  • Cultural and global health
Education and Training

Post-Doctorate (NIH), Health Psychology, University of Connecticut Medical-Dental School 

Ph.D., Social Psychology, Syracuse University 

M.S., Social Psychology, Syracuse University 

M.A., Mathematics, Pennsylvania State University 

B.A., Mathematics, Brooklyn College-C.U.N.Y.

Courses

HLTH 665 - Health Behavior I

Honors and Awards

Recent Grants (within last 7 years)

Co-Investigator, Motivations, patterns, antecedents of dual use of little cigars/cigarillos and cigarettes in a high risk population.  National Cancer Institute, 2015-2016,  $23,418.00.

 Principal Investigator (UMCP) and J. Lipscomb (PI, UMB), Blood-borne pathogen assessment survey among healthcare workers in Haiti. University of Maryland Research and Innovation Seed Grant Award, 2014-2016, $73,737.00.

Co-Investigator, Self-affirmation and responses to smoking risk messages among African Americans. National Cancer Institute, 2014-2016, $410,980.00.

  Co-Investigator, Rapid response characteristics of new and manipulated tobacco products. Director of Research and Training.  National Cancer Institute, 2013-2018, $18,648,449.00.

  Co-Principal Investigator, Exploring cultural, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing tobacco use among Asian Americans, Hispanics, African Americans and American Indians in Maryland.  Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 2008, $140,000.00.

 

 

 

Career Highlights

  • Professor, Department of Behavioral and Community Health, University of Maryland, College Park, 1990-present
  •   Director, Post-Doctoral Program, Tobacco Center on Regulatory Science at the University of Maryland, College Park, 2013 – present 
  • Affiliate Professor, Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, 2010-present
  • UNIBE International Professor of Psychology, Universidad de Iberoamérica (UNIBE), San José, Costa Rica, 2008-present
  • Best Paper Award (with B. Xie and M. Wang) from the ACM iConference, 2011.
  • Fellow, American Academy of Health Behavior, 2010.
  • International Travel Award to conduct sabbatical research at the Universidad de Iberoamérica, San José, Costa Rica, 2007-2008.
  • Visiting Scholar and Professor, Faculty of Education, University of Newcastle, Australia, 2000-2001.
  • Assistant Professor, Divisions of Health Education and Occupational Medicine, School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, 1978-79
  • N.I.H. Post-Doctoral Fellow, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Community Health, University of Connecticut Medical-Dental School, Farmington, Connecticut, 1977-1978.
  • Visiting Research Associate, Institute for Development Studies, University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya, 1973
  • Peace Corps Volunteer, High School Mathematics and Physics Teacher, Irrua, Ishan, Mid-West Nigeria (1966-67), Kisii, Kenya (1967-69)
Publications: 

Gryczynski, J, Feldman, R., Carter-Pokras, O., Kanamori, M., Chen, L, and Roth, S. (2010,). Contexts of tobacco use and perspectives on smoking cessation among urban American Indians. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, 21(2), 544-558.

Carter-Pokras, O., Feldman, R.H., Kanamori, M., Rivera, I., Chen, L., Baezconde-Garbanati, L., Nodora, J., and Noltenius, J. (2011). Barriers and facilitators to smoking cessation among Latino adults. Journal of the National Medical Association, 103, 423-431.

Pirutinsky, S., Rosmarin, D.H., Holt, C.L., Feldman, R.H., Caplan, L.S., Midlarsky, E., and Pargament, K.I. (2011). Does social support mediate the moderating effect of intrinsic religiosity on the relationship between physical health and depressive symptoms among Jews? Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 34, 489-496.

*Xie, B., Wang, M., Feldman, R. & Zhou, L. (2013). Internet use frequency and patient-centered care: Measuring patient preferences for participation using the Health Information Wants Questionnaire (HIWQ). Journal of Medical Internet Research, 15(7), e132.

*Wallen, J., Randolph, S. Carter-Pokras, O., Feldman, R., & Kanamori- Nishimura, M. (2014). Engaging African Americans in smoking cessation  programs.  American Journal of Health Education, 45, 151-157.

  *Xie, B., Wang, M., Feldman, R., & Zhou, L. (2014). Exploring older and younger adults' preferences for health information and participation in decision-making using the Health Information Wants Questionnaire (HIWQ). Health Expectations, 17(6), 795-808.

 *Kanamori M, Carter-Pokras O, Madhavan S, Feldman R, He X, & Lee S. (2014). Orphan/vulnerable child caregiving moderates the associationbetween women’s autonomy and their BMI in three African countries.  AIDS Care. 3, 1-10.

*Kanamori M, Carter-Pokras O, Madhavan S, Lee S, He X,  & Feldman R. (2015). Associations Between Orphan and Vulnerable Child Caregiving, Household Wealth Disparities, an*d Women’s Overweight Status in Three Southern African Countries Participating in Demographic Health Surveys. Maternal and Child Health Journal, 19(8), 1662-167

*Naim, A., Feldman, R. & Sawyer, R. (2015). A needs assessment of  health issues related to maternal mortality rates in Afghanistan:  A pilot study. International Quarterly of Community Health Education, 35,(3), 259- 269

*Kanamori, M. Carter-Pokras, O. Madhavan, S., Lee, S. He, X. & Feldman, R. (2015).  Overweight status of the primary caregivers of orphan and vulnerable children in 3 Southern African countries: A cross sectional study. BMC Public Health, 15, 757. DOI.

 

Program Director, School of Public Health, University Career Center
Other Affiliations: SPH
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: CASA- 0222
Phone: (301) 314-9268 |
Assistant Professor, Health Services Administration
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 3310B
Phone: (301) 405-1210 |
CV / Resume
PDF icon Andrew FenelonCV-web.pdf
Biography

Andrew Fenelon is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Services Administration in the School of Public Health at the University of Maryland. Dr. Fenelon brings a social science and population perspective to health services research, and his main research interests focus on health disparities, population health, health policy, and methods. His research has examined race/ethnic and socioeconomic differences in health in the United States, immigrant health and mortality, and cigarette smoking's impact on US life expectancy. Dr. Fenelon's current research addresses the effects of HUD rental assistance on health, health care access, and neighborhood attainment in the US using the recent National Health Interview Survey linkage to HUD administrative records. This work highlights the significant health and economic benefits of receiving rental assistance and provides important implications for social policies directed toward the reduction of health disparities. Dr. Fenelon's work has appeared in Social Science & Medicine, Demography, International Journal of Epidemiology, the American Journal of Public Health, Health Affairs and JAMA among other outlets. He is also a faculty associate at the Maryland Population Research Center.

Education and Training

PhD., Sociology and Demography, University of Pennsylvania, 2012     

A.M., Demography, University of Pennsylvania, 2008

B.A., Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara, 2007

Honors and Awards

NIA – F31-AG039188-01. National Institute on Aging National Research Service Award (F31), Ruth L. Kirschstein Pre-doctoral Fellowship. “The impact of cigarette smoking on mortality: a population based approach.” Role: PI

Publications: 

Simon, Alan, Fenelon, Andrew, Helms, Veronica, Lloyd, Patricia C. and Rossen, Lauren (2017) “Receipt of US Department of Housing and Urban Development Housing Assistance Associated with Lower Uninsurance and Unmet Medical Need” Health Affairs

Fenelon, Andrew, Mayne, Robert P., Simon, Alan, Helms, Veronica, Lloyd, Patricia C. and Rossen, Lauren, Sperling, Jon, and Steffen, Barry (2017) “Housing Assistance Programs and Adult Health in the United States” American Journal of Public Health

Fenelon, Andrew (2017) “Rethinking the Hispanic Paradox: the Mortality Experience of Mexican Immigrants in Traditional Gateways and New Destinations” International Migration Review.

Fenelon, Andrew, Chinn, Juanita, and Anderson, Robert (2017) “A Comprehensive Analysis of the Mortality Experience of Hispanic Subgroups in the United States” SSM-Population Health. 3: 245-254

Fenelon, Andrew and Sabrina Danielsen (2016) “Leaving My Religion: Understanding the Relationship Between Religious Disaffiliation, Health, and Well-Being” Social Science Research. 57: 49-62

Fenelon, Andrew, Chen, Li-Hui, and Baker, Susan P. (2016) “Major causes of injury death and the life expectancy gap between the United States and other high-income countries” Journal of the American Medical Association. 315(6): 609-611

Ho, Jessica and Andrew Fenelon (2015) “The Contribution of Smoking to Educational Gradients in U.S. Life Expectancy” Journal of Health and Social Behavior. 56(3): 307-322

Fenelon, Andrew and Laura Blue (2014) “Widening Life Expectancy Advantage of Hispanics in the United States: 1990 – 2010” Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health. 17:1130-1137

Sullivan, Allison R. and Andrew Fenelon (2014) “Patterns of Widowhood Mortality” Journal of Gerontology Series B: Social Sciences. 69B(1): 53-62

Fenelon, Andrew  (2013)  “Geographic Divergence in Mortality in the United States”  Population and Development Review. 39(4): 611-634

Fenelon, Andrew (2013) “An Examination of Black/White Differences in the Rate of Age-Related Mortality Increase” Demographic Research. 29: 441-472

Fenelon, Andrew (2013). “Revisiting the Hispanic Mortality Advantage in the United States: the role of smoking” Social Science & Medicine. 82: 1-9.

Myrskyla, Mikko and Andrew Fenelon (2012) “Maternal Age and Offspring Adult Health: Evidence from the Health and Retirement Study” Demography. 49(4): 1231-1257.

Fenelon, Andrew and Samuel H. Preston (2012). “Estimating smoking-attributable mortality in the United States” Demography. 49(3): 797-818

Blue, Laura and Andrew Fenelon. (2011) “Explaining Low Mortality among US Immigrants Relative to Native-Born Americans: The Role of Smoking” International Journal of Epidemiology. 40(3): 786-793

Gurven, Michael and Andrew Fenelon (2009) “Has actuarial aging “slowed” over the past 250 years? A comparison of small-scale subsistence populations and European cohorts.”  Evolution. 63(4): 1017-1035

Assistant Research Professor, Kinesiology
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health

Assistant Professor (Joint Appointment), Health Services Administration
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health

Building: School of Public Health

Biography

Joseph G. Flannery, MS, MHA, Health Care Administrator

Joe Flannery currently is a Joint Commission surveyor and faculty member. He is trained under the Accreditation Manual for Ambulatory Health Care and the Accreditation Manual for Hospitals. He is also specifically trained as a Bureau of Primary Health Care surveyor with additional Primary Care Medical Home and health system expertise. In addition, he is the surveyor representative on The Joint Commission’s Compliance Committee. Mr. Flannery has been a surveyor and faculty member for The Joint Commission since 1994.

Mr. Flannery, until January 2014, served as the Program Director and Health Management and Policy Track Coordinator for the Graduate Program in Public Health at Eastern Virginia Medical School. From 2009 – 2010 he was also an Accreditation and Regulatory Coordinator with Sentara Healthcare in Norfolk, Virginia.

Other positions held by Mr. Flannery include serving as the first Executive Director of Patriots Colony at Williamsburg, a continuing care retirement community owned and operated by Riverside Health System Health System in Newport News, Virginia from 1996 - 2002. While with Riverside he also served as the Director of Senior Services and Federal Programs.

From 2002 - 2009, he served as the Health System’s Corporate Compliance and Ethics Officer. He retired from Riverside in 2009.

While on active duty military service in the Army Medical Department he served as the first Director, Plans & Operations at TRICARE in Norfolk, Virginia; Chief, Management Division at Health Services Command in San Antonio, Texas; Associate Administrator - Clinical Services at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Landstuhl, Germany; and Associate Administrator - Clinical Services at the Medical Department Activity in West Point, New York. He retired from active duty in 1993 earning the Department of Defense Superior Service Medal.

Mr. Flannery is an adjunct professor with the University of Maryland, Eastern Virginia Medical School, and Old Dominion University offering graduate courses in Health Care Financing, Health Care Management and Leadership, Conflict Resolution and Negotiation, Public Health Practice and Management and Public Health Policy and Politics.

Mr. Flannery received his Bachelor of Science degree and his Master of Science in Health, Physical Education & Recreation at Eastern Michigan University in Ypsilanti, Michigan, and his Masters in Health Care Administration at Baylor University in Waco, Texas. He completed his residency in Health Care Administration at the U.S. Military Academy, Medical Department in West Point, New York. He also is a graduate of the Army’s Command and General Staff College.

Mr. Flannery is currently a resident of Poquoson, Virginia.  

Courses

HLSA 745

Assistant Research Professor, Health Services Administration
Director, MPH-PHPP, Certificate in Principles of Public Health
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health

Biography

Dr. Fouladi, who has an expertise in translating research into policy and qualitative research, joins HLSA as an Assistant Research Professor. She will serve as director of the online, accessible MPH Public Health Practice and Policy and the Certificate in Principles of Public Health programs.

Courses

HLSA601
HLSA785
HLSA786
HLSA688

 

B. Don Franks
Professor Emeritus, Kinesiology
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health
Phone: (301) 405-2450 |
Biography

In the past, Dr. Franks has conducted research related to acute and chronic effects of exercise on fitness and response to stress. Current research activities strive to interpret research for fitness professionals and the public, especially related to definitions and recommendations for physical activity, fitness, and health. 

Education and Training

B.S.Ed., University of Arkansas-Fayetteville, 1960; M.Ed.,  1961
Ph.D., University of Illinois-Urbana/Champaign, 1967

Luisa Franzini
Professor and Chair, Health Services Administration
Other Affiliations: Public Health Science
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 3310D
Phone: (301) 405-2470 |
Biography

Dr. Franzini is Professor and Chair of the Health Services Administration Department, School of Public Health, University of Maryland, College Park.  Her research interests focus on health care costs, health policy innovations in Maryland, and health disparities.

Dr. Franzini’s research has been published in Journal of the American Medical Association, Health Affairs, Health Services Research, American Journal of Managed Care, Social Science and Medicine, and the American Journal of Public Health. 

During the last 20 years, a major component of Fr. Franzini’s research and teaching activities has focused on the application of economics and econometrics to investigating the causes and consequences of disparities in health and health care delivery in vulnerable populations. She brings extensive experience in cost and cost-effectiveness analysis and a commitment to improving healthcare access and quality for vulnerable populations, including chronically ill patients and high-risk children on Medicaid. Her research on health disparities addresses the pathways through which socioeconomic disparities affect health, including trust, cultural factors, religion, policies to reduce disparities, healthcare disparities, and disparities in parenting and academic achievement.

Her methods expertise is: Econometrics, multilevel models, claims data, health economics, economic evaluation, cost-effectiveness and cost analysis, evaluation of interventions and policies.

Current Projects:

The impact of Maryland’s Global Budget Revenue System (GBRS) on cardiac care delivery systems and cardiac patient outcomes: Maryland is the most innovative state in health care. In 2014, the state launched the Maryland All Payer Model, which stipulated that all payers, private and public, pay the same rate for inpatient and outpatient hospital services to eliminate cost shifting among payers. Maryland also pledged to move away from fee for service reimbursements to a new hospital global budget payment program in which all hospitals are paid a fixed amount per year for inpatient and outpatient hospital services, irrespective of utilization. The goal is to reward hospitals for providing value and focusing on population health. In this project, we partner with University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, to assess the impact of the GBRS on cardiac patients. Have cardiac procedures shifted from tertiary care centers to community-based settings? What are the changes in mortality, re-admission, in-hospital complications and health care costs for patients with an Acute MI diagnosis?

The efficiency of neonatal intensive care:  Neonatal intensive care has been highly successful in reducing death and illness in newborns, particularly in very premature infants.  This success has led to tremendous growth in the availability and size of Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU), although the number of newborns has remained about the same. This project will use newly available population-based medical claims data to conduct the first study of the medical care of the entire newborn population including both the mildly and severely ill.  Using methods developed by the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care, we will examine regional and provider variation in NICU availability, the use and outcomes of NICU care, and associated costs for all newborns insured by Texas Medicaid. The findings will identify new opportunities for improvement in the quality of care at the same or lower cost.

The role of price and utilization in spending variation for hip and knee replacement in a privately insured population:  There is evidence that elective procedures such as hip and knee replacement are over-utilized. Thirty four percent of knee replacements performed over a 20-year period were classified as "inappropriate".  Rates of utilization differ markedly across hospital service areas, suggesting uncertainty among physicians regarding indications for replacement surgery.  This project describes spending, prices and utilization for hip and knee replacement and investigates the role of price and utilization in spending variation in a privately insured population and in Medicare. 

A Hospital-level Analysis of Commercial Prices for Inpatient Stays:  Researchers have extensively investigated provider- and market-level variations in Medicare spending and utilization patterns, but patterns of variation among the commercially insured are less well understood. In this project, we assess the hospital, market, provider and population characteristics that may affect variation in prices paid by a commercial health plan for inpatient hospital stays across hospitals. Using Cross Blue Shield of Texas claims data, we use regressions examine the association of hospital prices with hospital and market characteristics, including the socioeconomic characteristics of the resident population, BCBSTX market share, and a measure of hospital competition (the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index).

Vision for the department:

As the second chair of the UMD SPH Department of Health Services Administration, Dr. Franzini seeks to grow the department by recruiting more faculty and students. She has revamped the existing MHA and PhD programs and has expanded degree programs by offering a new MPH in Health Equity and a new MPH in Health Policy Analysis and Evaluation.  Her research efforts are focused on making available to departmental faculty and students health care data, such as the Maryland All-Payer Claims Database, and data from Optum Labs and Inovalon, as well strengthening collaborations with the state and the private sector. She also is looking forward to collaborating with other departments and schools on both the College Park and Baltimore campuses whose faculty members are engaged in research focused on improving healthcare policy, access, delivery and costs.

Before joining UMD, Dr. Franzini served as a professor at the University of Texas School of Public Health , where she was Director of the Division of Management, Policy and Community Health  and Director of the University of Texas School of Public Health/Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Texas Research Program in Payment Systems and Policies.

Education and Training

She trained as an econometrician and received her B.Sc, M.Sc, and PhD in Economics and Econometrics from the London School of Economics in England.

Publications: 

(selection; * indicates student)

L Franzini, S Taychakhoonavudh*, R Parikh*, C White “Medicare and private spending trends from 2008 to 2012 diverge in Texas” Medical Care Research and Review, vol. 72, 1: pp. 96-112, 2015.

C White, S Taychakhoonavudh*, R Parikh*, L Franzini “Roles of Prices, Poverty, and Health in Medicare and Private Spending in Texas” accepted American Journal of Managed Care, 2015.

IM Abbass*, TM Krause, SS Virani, JM Swint, W Chan, L Franzini “Revisiting the Economics Efficiencies of Observation Units” accepted  Managed Care, 2014.

HV Russell*, MF Okcu, K Kamdar, MD Shah, E Kim, JM Swint, W Chan, XL Du, L Franzini,  V Ho “Algorithm for analysis of administrative pediatric cancer hospitalization data according to indication for admission” accepted  BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, 2014.

IM Abbass*, SS Virani, JM Swint, W Chan, L Franzini “One-Year Outcomes Associated With Using Observation Services in Triaging Patients With Nonspecific Chest Pain” Clinical Cardiology, 2014, DOI: 10.1002/clc.22319.

L Franzini, C White, S Taychakhoonavudh*, R Parikh*, M Zezza, O Mikhail “Variation in inpatient hospital prices and outpatient service quantities drive geographic differences in private spending in Texas” Health Services Research, 2014, doi: 10.1111/1475-6773.12192.

CH Colla, WL Schpero, DJ Gottlieb,  AB McClurg, PG Albert, N Baum, K Finison, L Franzini, G Kitching, S Knudson, R Parikh*, R Symes, ES Fisher.  “Tracking Spending Among Commercially Insured Beneficiaries Using a Distributed Data Model” accepted American Journal of Managed Care, 2014.

T Richmond, MN Elliott; L Franzini; I Kawachi; MO Caughy; NJ Gilliland, CE Walls, FA Franklin, R Lowry; SW Banspach, MA Schuster “School programs and characteristics and their influence on student BMI: Findings from Healthy Passages” PLOS ONE, 2014, 9(1): e83254, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0083254.

KM Roche, MO Caughy, MA Schuster, LM Bogart, PJ Dittus, L Franzini “Cultural Orientations, Parental Beliefs and Practices, and Latino Adolescents’ Autonomy and Independence” accepted Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 43:1389-1403, 2014. DOI 10.1007/s10964-013-0077-6.

S Taychakhoonavudh*, L Franzini, LS Lal, EI Chang, CA Meyers, J Wefel, JM Swint “Comparison of time trade-off utility with neurocognitive function, performance status, and quality of life measures in patients with metastatic brain disease” Journal of Radiation Oncology, 3-2: 215-221, 2014, doi:10.1007/s13566-013-0093-8.

L Franzini, OI Mikhail, M Zezza, I Chan, SC Shen, J Smith. “Comparing Variation in Medicare and Private Insurance Spending in Texas” American Journal of Managed Care, Vol. 17 Issue 12, pe488-e495, 2011.

L Franzini, K Sail*, EJ Thomas, L Wueste “Cost and cost-effectiveness of a tele-ICU program at a large healthcare system” Journal of Critical Care.  26(3):329.e1-329.e6, 2011.

RL McConley, S Mrug, MJ Gilliland, R Lowry, MN Elliott, MA Schuster, LM Bogart, L Franzini, SL Escobar-Chaves,  FA Franklin. “Mediators of Maternal Depression and Family Structure on Child BMI: Parenting Quality and Risk Factors for Child Overweight” Obesity, 19(2):345-52, 2011.

R Basu*, L Franzini, PM Krueger, DR Lairson “Lifetime medical expenditures among hypertensive men and women in the U.S.”, Women's Health Issues. 20(2):114-25, 2010.

L Franzini, J Skinner, O Mikhail “McAllen And El Paso Revisited: Medicare Variations Not Always Reflected In The Under-Sixty-Five Population” Health Affairs, 29 (12): 2302-2309, 2010.

L Franzini, M Giannoni. “Determinants of health disparities between Italian regions” BMC Public Health, 10:296 (1 June 2010) http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/10/296, 2010.

JA Boom, LC Shani, CS Nelson, AC Dragsbeak, L Franzini “Immunization information system opt-in consent: At what cost?” Journal of Public Health Management and Practice, 16(5): E18-E25, 2010.

L Franzini, W Taylor, MN Elliott, P Cuccaro, SR Tortolero, MJ Gilliland, JA Grunbaum, MA Schuster “Neighborhood characteristics favorable to outdoor physical activity: Disparities by socioeconomic and racial/ethnic composition” Health and Place, 16(2): 267-274, 2010.

L Franzini, MN Elliott, P Cuccaro, M Schuster, MJ Gilliland, JA Grunbaum, F Franklin, SR Tortolero “Influences of physical and social neighborhood environments on child physical activity and obesity” American Journal of Public Health, 99(2), 271-278, 2009.

L Franzini “Self-rated health, and trust in low income Mexican-origin individuals in Texas” Social Science and Medicine, 67(12): 1959-1969, 2008.

L Franzini “Predictors of trust in low income, minority neighborhoods in Texas” Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, 19(4):1282-1302, 2008.

L Franzini, E Thomas “Costs and effectiveness of tele-ICU in reducing morbidity and mortality in ICUs” Journal of Medical Economics, 11(1): 165-169, 2008.

L Franzini, CB Dyer “Health care costs and utilization of vulnerable elders reported to adult protective services for self-neglect” Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 56: 667-676, 2008; published with editorial comment by M. Lachs pages 757.

BC Dyer, Franzini, L, M Watson, L Sanchez, L Prati, S Mitchell, R Wallace, S Pickens “Future research: A prospective longitudinal study of elder self-neglect” Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 56 (SUPPL. 2): S261-S265, 2008.

L Franzini, MO Caughy, SM Nettles, P O’Campo. “Perceptions of disorder: Contributions of neighborhood characteristics to subjective perceptions of disorder” Journal of Environmental Psychology, 28: 83-93, 2008.

Research Assistant Professor, Kinesiology
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2351
Phone: (301) 405-2450 |
Biography

Michael Friedman is an Assistant Research Professor in the Physical Cultural Studies Program in the Department of Kinesiology.  His research focuses on the relationship between public policy, urban design, and professional sports in the postindustrial city with a perspective informed by cultural studies and cultural geography.  By examining sports facilities such as stadiums and arenas, he is concerned with the ways in which space expresses and (re)produces power relationships, social identities, and societal structures.  Dr. Friedman is in the process of writing a book – Mallparks: The Social Construction of Baseball Stadiums as Cathedrals of Consumption.  The book ties together more than a decade’s research and publishing on baseball stadium development, including articles on Baltimore’s Camden Yards, Boston’s Fenway Park, and Washington’s Nationals Park.  He has published research in the Sociology of Sport Journal, International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Journal of Urban Affairs, Journal of Sport History, and Economic Development Quarterly, and City, Culture & Society.  In 2008, Dr. Friedman was the winner of the Barbara S. Brown Outstanding Student Paper Award (doctoral category) from the North American Society for the Sociology of Sport.

Courses

KNES 293: History of Sport in America

The growth and development of sport in America. The transformation of sport within the perspective of American history, including class sport, professionalization, amateurism, and international involvement.

Publications: 

Friedman, M.T. (in press). The social construction of baseball stadiums as cathedrals of consumption.  In W. Simons (ed.), The Cooperstown Symposium on Baseball and American Culture: 2015-2016.  Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company

 

Friedman, M.T. (in press). Mallparks: Conceiving cathedrals of consumption.  In C. Howley (ed)., Space, Place & Sport: Probing the Boundaries (electronic book).  Freeland, UK: Inter-Disciplinary.net.

 

Friedman, M.T., (in press).  Mallparks and the symbolic reconstruction of urban space.  In N. Koch (ed.), Critical Geographies of Sport: Space, Power and Sport in Global Perspective.  London: Routledge.

 

Friedman, M.T., & Bustad, J.  (in press).  The urbanization of sports.  In R. Edelman & W. Wilson (Eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Sports History.  Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

 

Friedman, M.T., Bustad, J. & Andrews, D.L. (2012).  Feeding the downtown monster: (Re)developing Baltimore’s “tourist bubble”.  City, Culture and Society, 3(3), 209-218.

Associate Professor, Behavioral and Community Health
Associate Director, Maryland Center for Health Equity
Other Affiliations: Center for Health Equity, UMD - Not within SPH
Campus: UMD | Building: 4200 Valley Drive, SPH | Room: 1234X
Phone: (301) 405-0818 |
Laboratory Website: 
Young Adult Drug Involvement Research Assessment (YADIRA) Laboratory
Website: 
sph.umd.edu/yadira
Office Hours: 

By appointment only; please email.

Biography

Trained as behavioral scientist, Dr. Fryer utilizes mixed methods study designs to examine the sociocultural context of health and health status, with an emphasis in community-engaged research. His work focuses on racial and ethnic health disparities in substance use and dependence, specifically tobacco and marijuana use among racial and ethnic youth and young adult populations. Dr. Fryer was recently awarded a Tier 1 proof of concept/seed grant through the University of Maryland, Division of Research titled, "Smoke What?": Examining the Smoking Identity of Black Youth and Young Adults. The aim of the study is to develop survey items as the foundation for a future smoking identity scale inclusive of the experiences of black youth and young adults. 

He has completed work as the Principal Investigator of a five-year, NIH/NCI-funded K01 career development award, Correlates of Nicotine Dependence among Urban African American Youth. Additionally, he concluded research as a Co-Investigator on the FDA/NCI-funded, Assessing Risk Perceptions for Small Cigars/Cigarillos among Young Adults and as a Co-Investigator and the Research Core Director of the Center of Excellence on Race, Ethnicity, and Health Disparities Research grant within the Maryland Center for Health Equity (M-CHE) funded by the National Institute for Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD).

Dr. Fryer's collateral research endeavors include: African American men’s health; behavioral intervention research; and the respectful, recruitment and retention of underrepresented communities in research.

Education and Training

BS, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, 1992

MPH, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, 1997

DrPH, Columbia University, New York, NY, 2006

Courses

HLTH 130: Introduction to Public and Community Health

HLTH 230: Introduction to Health Behavior

HLTH 606: Foundations of Public Health Education and Policy

HLTH 688/898: Forum on Tobacco-Related Health Disparities

 

Honors and Awards

2014        George F. Kramer Practitioner of the Year Award, University of Maryland, School of Public Health

2013        Scholar, Inaugural ADVANCE Program for Inclusion Excellence, University of Maryland, Provost

                 Office, Office of Diversity and Inclusion 

2012        Attendee, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, New Connections Symposium

2007-13  Health Disparities Scholar, NIH Research Loan Repayment Program, National Institute on

                   Minority Health & Health Disparities

Collaborators

Dr. Kymberle Sterling, Associate Professor, Georgia State University, School of Public Heath

Dr. Erika Trapl, Assistant Professor, Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine

Publications: 
  • Sterling, KL, FRYER, CS, Pagano, I, Fagan, P. (2017). Flavored Cigar Misconceptions and Uncertainty: Identifying At-Risk Smokers, Tobacco Regulatory Science, 3(2 Suppl 1): S17-S30.
  • Trapl, ES, O'Rourke-Suchoff, D, Yoder, LD, Cofie, L, Frank, JL, FRYER, CS. (2017). Youth Acquisition and Situational Use of Cigars, Cigarillos, and Little Cigars: A Cross-Sectional Study. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 52(1): e9-e16.
  • Sterling, KL, FRYER, CS, Pagano, I, Jones, D, Fagan, P. (2016). The Association between Menthol-Flavored Cigarette Smoking and Flavored Little Cigar and Cigarillo Use among African-American, Hispanic, and White Young Adult Smokers, Tobacco Control, 25 (Suppl 2): ii21-ii31.
  • Sterling, KL, FRYER, CS, Pagano, I, Fagan, P. (2016). Little Cigars and Cigarillos (LCCs) Use among Young Adult Cigarette Smokers in the U.S.: Understanding Risk of Concomitant Use Subtypes, Nicotine and Tobacco Research, 18(12): 2234-2242.
  • FRYER, CS, Passmore, SR, Maietta, R, Petruzzelli, JM, Casper, EC, *Brown, NA, Butler, JB, Garza, MA, Thomas, SB, Quinn, SC.  (2016). The Symbolic Value and Limitations of Racial Concordance in the Recruitment of Minority Populations in Research. Qualitative Health Research, 26(6), 830-841.
  • Passmore, SR, FRYER, CS, Butler, J, Garza, MA, Thomas, SB, Quinn, SC.  (2016). Building a “Fund of Good Will”: Reframing Research Engagement. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, 27(2), 722-740.
  • Sterling, KL, FRYER, CS, and Fagan, P. (2016). “The Most Natural Tobacco Used”: A Qualitative Investigation of Young Adult Smokers’ Risk Perceptions of Flavored Little Cigars and Cigarillos (LCCs). Nicotine and Tobacco Research, 18(5), 827-833.
  • Sterling, KL, FRYER, CS, Nix, M, and Fagan, P. (2015). Appeal and Impact of Characterizing Flavors on Young Adult Small Cigar Use. Tobacco Regulatory Science, 1(1), 42-53.
  • Fagan, P, Pohkrel, P, Herzog, T, Pagano, I, Vallone, D, Trinidad, D, Sakuma, K, Sterling, K, FRYER, CS, Moolchan, E. (2015). Comparisons of Three Nicotine Dependence Scales among a Multiethnic Sample of Young Adult Menthol and Non-Menthol Smokers. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 149, 203-211.
  • Sterling, KL, FRYER, CS, Duong, MM, Majeed, B. (2015). Promotion of Waterpipe Tobacco Use, its Variants, and Accessories in Young Adult Newspapers: A Content Analysis of Message Portrayal. Health Education Research, 30(1), 152-161.
  • Butler, J, Quinn, SC, FRYER, CS, Garza, MA, Kim, K, Thomas, SB. (2013). Characterizing Researchers by Strategies Used for Retaining Minority Populations: Results of a National Survey. Contemporary Clinical Trials, 36(1), 61-67.
  • Quinn, SC, Butler, J, FRYER, CS, Garza, MA, Kim, KH, Ryan, C, Thomas, SB. (2012). Attributes of Researchers and their Strategies to Recruit Minority Populations: Results of a National Survey. Contemporary Clinical Trials, 33, 1231-1237.
  • Tharp-Taylor, S, FRYER, CS, and Shadel, W. (2012). Targeting Anti-Smoking Messages: Does Audience Race Matter? Addictive Behaviors, 37(7), 844-847.
  • Thomas, SB, Quinn, SC, Butler, J, FRYER, CS, Garza, MA.  (2011). Toward a Fourth Generation of Disparities Research to Achieve Health Equity. Annual Review of Public Health, 32, 399-416.
  • Shadel, WG, FRYER, CS, Tharp-Taylor, S. (2010). Tobacco Industry Manipulation in Anti-Smoking PSAs: the Effect of Explicitly and Implicitly-Delivered Messages. Addictive Behaviors, 35(5), 526-529.
  • Shadel, WG, Tharp-Taylor, S, and FRYER, CS. (2009). How Does Exposure to Cigarette Advertising Contribute to Smoking in Adolescents? The Role of the Developing Self-Concept and Identification with Advertising Models. Addictive Behaviors. 34(11), 932-937.
  • Shadel, WG, FRYER, CS, Tharp-Taylor, S. (2009). Uncovering the Most Effective Active Ingredients of Anti-Smoking PSAs: the Role of Actor and Message Characteristics. Nicotine and Tobacco Research. 11(5), 547-552.
  • Shadel, WG, Tharp-Taylor, S, and FRYER, CS. (2008). Exposure to Cigarette Advertising and Adolescents’ Intentions to Smoke: The Moderating Role of the Developing Self-Concept. Journal of Pediatric Psychology. 33(7), 751-760.
  • Falkin, G, FRYER, CS, and M. Mahadeo. (2007). Smoking Cessation and Stress among Teenagers. Qualitative Health Research. 17(6), 812-823.
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 3310
Phone: (301) 405-6125 |
Development Coordinator, Office of the Dean
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health

Assistant Professor, Behavioral and Community Health
Associate Director, Maryland Center for Health Equity
Other Affiliations: Center for Health Equity
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2371
Phone: (301) 405-0766 |
Biography

Mary A. Garza, PhD, MPH is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Behavioral and Community Health and Associate Director in the Center for Health Equity at the University of Maryland, School of Public Health. Dr. Garza received her MPH from the School of Public Health at San Diego State University with an emphasis in health education and health promotion. Post MPH degree, Dr. Garza worked as a health coordinator for a federally qualified health center in Coachella Valley, CA where she gained valuable community-level experience working with low-income migrant farm workers (primarily Latinos and African Americans). She coordinated local, state, and federal community education and medical treatment programs with a focus on diabetes, cancer screening, hypertension, STDs, and HIV/AIDS. Dr. Garza returned to graduate school, and received her PhD in Health Policy and Management with a focus in Social and Behavioral Sciences from the Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University where she also completed a post-doctoral fellowship in Cancer Epidemiology. Dr. Garza's research activities embrace the full spectrum of the intervention research process-from planning, developing, implementing, and evaluating, to dissemination of research findings - using a community-based participatory research approach. She has a strong interest in health disparities research, including understanding the interplay of psychosocial, behavioral, and neighborhood-level factors associated with health behavior; specifically, factors related to cancer screening. Dr. Garza's research interests also include the role and influence of religion and spirituality on health outcomes and domestic violence. Currently, Dr. Garza is the principal investigator of a NCI-funded, K01 Mentored Research Scientist Development Award to Promote Diversity (K01), titled “African Americans and Colorectal Cancer: A Multilevel Model to Assess Factors for Screening.” The objective of the K01 is to characterize individual and neighborhood-level risk and protective factors associated with colorectal cancer screening behavior among African-Americans. Additionally, Dr. Garza’s research involves assessing the prevailing perceptions, knowledge and attitudes toward participation in biomedical research, including clinical trials. Moreover, she is working with the Health Advocates in Reach and Research (HAIR) network, a barbershop initiative, to promote cancer screening in barbershops.

Courses

HLTH 391: Principles of Community Health 1

Publications: 
  • Thomas SB, Quinn S, Butler J, Fryer CS, Garza, MA . (2011) Fourth Generation Health Disparities Research: Accelerating Innovations to Achieve Health Equity. Annual Review of Public Health, 32, 399-416.
  • Wilson-Frederick, SM, Williams CD, Garza MA , Navas-Acien A, Emerson MR, Ahmed S and Ford JG. (2011) Association of secondhand smoke exposure with nicotine dependence among Black smokers. Addictive Behaviors, 36(4): 412-415.
  • Sellars B, Garza MA , Fryer CS, Spencer M, Thomas SB. (2010) Racial differences in social support and medical mistrust on utilization of health care services. Journal of National Medical Association, In Press.
  • Taioli E, Garza MA , Moore CG, Ahn YO, Bost J, Budai B, Canzian F, Chen K, Keku T, Lima C, Le Marchand L, Matsuo K, Plaschke M, Pufulete M, Thomas SB, Toffoli G, Wolf CR, Little J. (2009). A meta- and pooled analysis of the MTHFR C677T genetic polymorphism and colorectal cancer: HuGE review. American Journal of Epidemiology, 170(10):1207-1221. PMCID: PMC2781761
  • Rajakumar K, Thomas SB, Musa D, Almario D, Garza MA . (2009). Racial differences in parental distrust towards medicine and research. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, 163(2): 108-114.
  • Garza MA , Abatemarco D, Gizzi C, Abbeglen L. (2009). Transforming the Pierce County cross collaborative through assessment capacity building. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice, 15(1): 70-74.
  • Gielen AC, Campbell JC, Garza MA , O’Campo P, Dienemann J, Jones A, Lloyd D. (2006). Domestic violence in the military: women’s policy preferences and beliefs concerning routine screening and mandatory reporting. Military Medicine, 171(8):729-735.
  • Bowie JV, Curbow B, Garza MA , Dreyling E, Scott LB, McDonnell K. (2005). A review of breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening interventions in older women. Cancer Control, 12(2): 58-69.
  • Garza MA , Luan J, Blinka M, Neuhaus C, Zabora J, Ford JG. (2005). A culturally targeted intervention to promote breast cancer screening among low-income women in East Baltimore, Maryland. Cancer Control, 12(2): 34-41.
  • Curbow B, Bowie JV, Garza MA , McDonnell K, Scott LB, Coyne C, Chiappelli T. (2004). Community-based cancer screening programs in older populations: making progress but can we do better? Preventive Medicine, 38(6): 676-693.
Assistant Professor, Kinesiology
Program in Neuroscience and Cognitive Science (NACS)
Maryland Robotics Center

Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2138
Phone: (301) 405-2490 |
Laboratory Website: 
Neuromotor Control and Learning Laboratory
Biography

The central theme of Dr. Gentili's research is to understand the brain processes underlying human motor behavior by employing, experimental cognitive-motor neuroscience, computational modeling and robotics-based approaches. Dr. Gentili uses electroencephalography (EEG), functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), kinematics, dynamics, electromyography (EMG), computational modeling and robotics to examine the brain processes underlying human cognitive-motor adaptation, learning and performance.  The long-term goals of his research team include: i) understanding how the brain integrates the physical properties of upper-limb effectors and novel environments in relationship with specific cognitive processes (e.g., mental imagery, inhibitory, attentional mechanisms) during adaptive cognitive-motor behavior and ii) developing intelligent systems to monitor and enhance/regain cognitive-motor behavior through human-machine interaction. In addition his work will inform the development of the next generation of biomedical applications (e.g., brain biomarker monitoring, intervention programs, human-machine collaborative autonomy for rehabilitation). 

Click here for the University of Maryland's Neuroscience and Cognitive Science (NACS) Homepage

Click here for the University of Maryland's Robotics Center Homepage

Courses

Courses offered through the Department of Kinesiology:

KNES 385 – Motor Control and Learning: Introduction to the underlying physiological and cognitive bases of human motor control and learning and their applications to the acquisition of movement skills and movement disorders.

KNES 462 - Neural basis of Human Movement: Introduction to the neuroanatomical and neurophysiological basis of motor functioning underlying postural and volitional movement with application to neural impairments.

KNES 498C/689R - Quantitative Methods in Cognitive Motor Behavior (Matlab™ programming): Introduction to computer programming (Matlab™) and basic time-series analysis with an emphasis on human performance.

Publications: 

Journal articles

Papaxanthis C, Schieppati M, Gentili RJ, Pozzo T. (2002). Imagined and actual arm movements have similar durations when performed under different conditions of direction and mass. Experimental Brain Research, 143(4):447-452.

Gentili RJ, Cahouet V, Ballay Y, Papaxanthis C. (2004). Inertial properties of the arm are accurately predicted during motor imagery. Behavioural Brain Research, 155(2):231–239.

Courtine G, Papaxanthis C, Gentili RJ, Pozzo T. (2004). Gait-dependent motor memory facilitation in covert movement execution.  Brain Research, Cognitive Brain Research, 22(1):67-75.

Gentili RJ, Papaxanthis C, Pozzo T. (2006). Improvement and generalization of arm motor performance through motor imagery practice. Neuroscience, 137(3):761-772.

Gentili RJ, Cahouet V, Papaxanthis C. (2007). Motor planning of arm movements is direction-dependent in the gravity field. Neuroscience, 145(1):20-32.

Gentili RJ, Papaxanthis C, Ebadzadeh M, Eskiizmirliler S, Ouanezar S, Darlot C. (2009). Integration of gravitational torques in cerebellar pathways allows for the dynamic inverse computation of vertical pointing movements of a robot arm. Public Library of Science ONE, 4(4):e5176.

Bradberry TJ, Gentili RJ, Contreras-Vidal JL. (2010). Reconstructing three-dimensional hand movements from noninvasive electroencephalographic signals. Journal of Neuroscience, 30(9): 3432-3437.

Gentili RJ, Han CE, Schweighofer N, Papaxanthis C. (2010). Motor learning without doing: trial-by-trial improvement in motor performance during mental training. Journal of Neurophysiology, 104(2):774-783.

Bradberry TJ, Gentili RJ, Contreras-Vidal JL. (2011). Fast attainment of computer cursor control with noninvasively acquired brain signals. Journal of Neural Engineering, 8(3):036010.

Gentili RJ, Bradberry TJ, Oh H, Hatfield BD, Contreras-Vidal JL. (2011). Cerebral cortical dynamics during visuomotor transformation: adaptation to a cognitive-motor executive challenge. Psychophysiology, 48(6):813-824.

Rietschel JC, Miller MW, Gentili RJ, Goodman RN, McDonald CG, Hatfield BD. (2012). Cerebral-cortical networking and activation increase as a function of cognitive-motor task difficulty. Biological Psychology, 90(2):127-133.

Gentili RJ, Patricia A Shewokis, Ayaz H, Contreras-Vidal JL. (2013). Functional near-infrared spectroscopy-based correlates of prefrontal cortical dynamics during a cognitive-motor executive adaptation task. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 4(7):277.

Miller MW, Presacco A, Groman LJ, Bur S, Rietschel JC, Gentili RJ, McDonald CG, Iso-Ahola S, Hatfield BD. (2014). The effects of team environment on cerebral cortical processes and attentional reserve. Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology. 3(1), 61-74.

Di-Wei Huang, Gentili RJ, Reggia JA.(2015). Self-Organizing Maps Based on Limit Cycle Attractors. Neural Networks, 63:208-22.

Gentili RJ, Bradberry TJ, Oh H, Costanzo ME, Kerick SE, Contreras-Vidal JL, Hatfield BD. (2015). Evolution of cerebral cortico-cortical communication during visuomotor adaptation to a cognitive-motor executive challenge. Biological Psychology, 105:51-65.

Gentili RJ, Oh H, Huang D-W, Katz GE, Miller RH, Reggia JA. (2015). A neural architecture for performing actual and mentally simulated movements during self-intended and observed bimanual arm reaching movements. International Journal of Social Robotics, 7(3), 371-392.

Gentili RJ, Papaxanthis C. (2015). Laterality effects in motor learning by mental practice in right-handers. Neuroscience. 297:231-42.

Gentili RJ, Oh H, Kregling VA, Reggia JA. (2016). A cortical model for inverse kinematics computation of a humanoid finger with mechanically coupled joints. Bioinspiration & Biomimetics, 11(3):036013. 

Huang DW, Gentili RJ, Katz GE, Reggia JA. (2017). A limit-cycle self-organizing map architecture for stable arm control. Neural Network. 85:165-181.

Blanco JA, Johnson MK,  Jaquess KJ, Oh H, Lo L-C, Gentili RJ, Hatfield BD. Quantifying cognitive workload in simulated flight using passive, dry EEG measurements. IEEE Transactions on Cognitive and Developmental Systems. IEEE Transactions on Cognitive and Developmental Systems. 

Conference proceedings

Gentili RJ, Bradberry TJ, Hatfield BD, Contreras-Vidal JL. (2008). A new generation of non-invasive biomarkers of cognitive-motor states with application to smart brain computer interfaces. Proceeding of the 16th European Signal Processing Conference (EUSIPCO-2008), EURASIP Society, 2008, August 25-27, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Bradberry TJ, Gentili RJ, Contreras-Vidal JL. (2009). Decoding three-dimensional hand kinematics from electroencephalographic signals. Proceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS ’09), September 2-6, p. 5010-3013, Minneapolis, USA.

Gentili RJ, Bradberry TJ, Hatfield BD, Contreras-Vidal JL. (2009). Brain biomarkers of motor adaptation using phase synchronization. Proceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS ’09), September 2-6, p. 5930-5933, Minneapolis, USA.

Gillespie RB, Contreras-Vidal JL, Shewokis PA, O'Malley MK, Brown JD, Agashe H, Gentili RJ, Davis A. (2010). Toward improved sensorimotor integration and learning using upper-limb prosthetic devices. Proceedings of the 32nd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS ’10), August 31 - September 4, p. 5077-5080, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Gentili RJ, Hadavi C, Hayaz H, Shewokis PA, Contreras-Vidal JL. (2010). Hemodynamic correlates of visuomotor adaptation by functional near infrared spectroscopy. Proceedings of the 32nd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS ’10), August 31 - September 4, p. 2918-2921, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Oh H, Gentili RJ, Reggia JA, Contreras-Vidal JL. (2011). Learning of spatial relationships between observed and imitated actions allows invariant inverse computation in the frontal mirror neuron system. Proceedings of the 33rd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS ’11), August 30 - September 3, p. 4183-4186, Boston, USA.

Gentili RJ, Oh H, Molina J, Contreras-Vidal JL. (2011). Cortical network modeling for inverse kinematic computation of an anthropomorphic finger. Proceedings of the 33rd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS ’11), August 30 - September 3, p. 8251-8254, Boston, USA.

Gentili RJ. (2011). Non-invasive functional brain biomarkers for cognitive-motor performance assessment: Towards new brain monitoring applications. Proceedings of the 14th Human-Computer Interaction Conference. Foundations of Augmented Cognition. Directing the Future of Adaptive Systems. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, July 9-14, 6780(2011), p. 159-168, Orlando, USA.

Shewokis PA, Ayaz H, Izzetoglu M, Bunce S, Gentili RJ, Sela I, Izzetoglu K, Onaral B. (2011). Brain in the loop: Assessing learning using fNIR in cognitive and motor tasks. Proceedings of the 14th Human-Computer Interaction Conference. Foundations of Augmented Cognition. Directing the Future of Adaptive Systems. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, July 9-14, 6780(2011), p. 240-249, Orlando, USA.

Oh H, Gentili RJ, Reggia JA, Contreras-Vidal JL. (2012). Modeling of visuospatial perspectives processing and modulation of the fronto-parietal network activity during action imitation. Proceedings of the 34th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS ’12), August 28 - September 1, p. 2551-2554, San Diego, USA.

Gentili RJ, Oh H, Molina J, Reggia JA, Contreras-Vidal JL. (2012). Cortex inspired model for inverse kinematics computation for a humanoid robotic finger. Proceedings of the 34th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS ’12), August 28 - September 1, p. 3052-3055, San Diego, USA.

Oh H, Gentili RJ, Costanzo ME, Lo LC, Rietschel JC, Saffer M, Hatfield BD. (2013). Understanding brain connectivity patterns during motor performance under social-evaluative competitive pressure. Proceedings of the 15th Human-Computer Interaction Conference. Foundations of Augmented Cognition. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 21 - 26 July, 8027(2013), p. 361-370, Las Vegas, USA.

Gentili RJ, Oh H, Shuggi I, Rietschel JC, Hatfield BD, Reggia JA. (2013). Human-robotic collaborative intelligent control for reaching performance. Proceedings of the 15th Human-Computer Interaction Conference. Foundations of Augmented Cognition. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 21 - 26 July, 8027(2013), p. 666-675, Las Vegas, USA.

Langsfeld JD, Kaipa KN, Gentili RJ, Reggia JA, Gupta SK. Incorporating failure-to-success transitions in imitation learning for a dynamic pouring task. Proceedings of the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS ‘14), September 14–18, Chicago, USA.

Gentili RJ, Rietschel JC, Jaquess KJ, Lo L-C, Prevost M, Miller MW, Mohler JM, Oh H, Tan YY, Hatfield BD. (2014). Brain biomarkers based assessment of cognitive workload in pilots under various task demands. Proceedings of the 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS ’14), August 28 - September 01, p. 5860 - 5863, San Diego, USA.

Gentili RJ, Oh H, Huang D-W, Katz GE, Miller RH, Reggia JA. (2014). Towards a multi-level neural architecture that unifies self-intended and imitated arm reaching performance. Proceedings of the 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBS ’14), August 28 - September 01, p. 2537 - 2540, San Diego, USA.

Huang D-W, Gentili RJ, Reggia JA. (2014). Limit cycle representation of spatial locations using self-organizing maps. IEEE Symposium on Computational Intelligence, Cognitive Algorithms, Mind, and Brain (CCMB'14), p. 79-84, Orlando, FL, USA.

Johnson MK, Blanco JA, Gentili RJ, Jacquess KJ, Oh H, Hatfield BD. (2015). Probe-independent EEG assessment of mental workload in pilots. IEEE Neural Engineering and Rehabilitation (IEEE NER 2015). ), p. 581 – 584, Montpelier, France.

Oh H, Hatfield BD, Jaquess KJ, Lo L-C, Tan YY, Prevost MC, Mohler JM, Postlethwaite H, Rietschel JC, Miller MW, Postlethwaite H, Blanco JA, Chen S, Gentili RJ. (2015). A composite cognitive workload assessment system in pilots under various task demands using ensemble learning. Proceedings of the 17th Human-Computer Interaction Conference. Foundations of Augmented Cognition. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 9183), 91-100, 2-7 August, Los Angeles, USA, in press.

Gentili RJ, Shuggi IM, King KM, Oh H, Shewokis PA. (2015). Cognitive-motor processes during arm reaching performance through a human body-machine interface. Proceedings of the 17th Human-Computer Interaction Conference. Foundations of Augmented Cognition. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, (9183), 381-392, 2-7 August, Los Angeles, USA.

Huang D-W, Katz GE, Langsfeld J, Gentili RJ, Reggia JA. (2015). A virtual demonstrator environment for robot imitation learning. IEEE International Conference on Technologies for Practical Robot Applications (TePRA 2015), p. 1-6, Boston, MA.

Katz GE, Huang D-W, Gentili RJ, Reggia JA. (2016). Imitation learning as cause-effect reasoning. 9th Artificial General Intelligence (AGI-16), July 16–19, New York City, NY, USA. In Steunebrink, B., Wang, P., & Goertzel, B. (Eds.), Artificial General Intelligence, (pp. 64–73). Springer.

Book chapters

Gentili RJ, Oh H, Bradberry TJ, Hatfield BD, Contreras-Vidal JL. (2010). Signal processing for non-invasive brain biomarkers of sensorimotor performance and brain monitoring. In S. Miron (Eds.). Signal Processing, p. 461-502, In-Tech, Vienna, Austria.

Gentili RJ, Oh H, J. Molina, Contreras-Vidal JL. (2011). Neural network models for reaching and dexterous manipulation in humans and anthropomorphic robotic systems. In V. Cutsuridis, A. Hussain, J.G. Taylor (Eds.). Perception-Action Cycle: Models, Architectures, and Hardware, p. 187-217, Springer, New York, USA.

Instructor, Kinesiology
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2351
Phone: (301) 405-2450 |
Biography

Drew Ginsberg is currently an instructor and PhD student in the Department of Kinesiology. As a graduate student (working under the direction and guidance of Dr. Hatfield) member of the Cognitive Motor Neuroscience Laboratory, the tools the research team uses to investigate the effects of cognitive load on human performance include EEG, ECG, eye-tracking, and questionnaires. Drew has coaching experience ranging from youth to collegiate athletics and has also taught middle school and high school health and physical education. 

 

Education and Training

Current PhD Student Cognitive Motor Neuroscience Department of Kinesiology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD

2010 Masters of Art and Teaching in Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, Manhattanville College, Purchase, NY

2007 Bachelor of Science in Applied Exercise Science Springfield College, Springfield, MA

Courses

KNES100N, Physical Education Activities: Basketball (Beginning)

KNES100O, Physical Education Activities: Basketball (Intermediate)

KNES131V, Physical Education Activities: Jogging (Beginning)

KNES131O, Physical Education Activities: Jogging (Intermediate)

KNES131Z, Physical Education Activities: Softball (Beginning)

KNES132N, Physical Education Activities: Badminton (Beginning)

KNES152N, Physical Education Activities: Soccer (Beginning)

KNES152O, Physical Education Activities: Soccer (Intermediate)

KNES155N, Physical Education Activities: Tennis (Beginning)

KNES155O, Physical Education Activities: Tennis (Intermediate)

KNES157N, Physical Education Activities: Weight Training (Beginning)

KNES157N, Physical Education Activities: Weight Training, Freshman Connection

KNES157O, Physical Education Activities: Weight Training (Intermediate)

KNES160N, Physical Education Activities: Volleyball (Beginning)

KNES160O, Physical Education Activities: Volleyball (Intermediate)

KNES161N, Physical Education Activities: Conditioning (Beginning)

KNES161O, Physical Education Activities: Conditioning (Intermediate)

KNES370, Motor Development, Discussion (TA)

KNES 389P Strength & Conditioning of Athletes (with Coach John Philbin) (TA)

KNES497, Kinesiology Senior Seminar, Exercise and Brain Health: From Psychology to Behavior (TA)

Honors and Awards

Most Valuable Professor (MVP), Maryland Women’s Basketball, University of Maryland, February 2015

Lynn Wagner Owens Faculty Physical Activity Instruction Award, University of Maryland, May 2014

Most Valuable Professor (MVP), Maryland Men’s Soccer, University of Maryland, November 2013

Outstanding Graduate Physical Education Student, Manhattanville College, May 2010

Co-Captain Springfield College Men’s Lacrosse Team 2006-2007

Campus: UMD | Building: Center for Health Behavior Research | Room: 2387
Phone: (301) 405-2029 |
Office Hours: 

By appointment only.

CV / Resume
Microsoft Office document icon Latest CV
Biography

Dr Glover is an Emeritus Professor in the Department of Behavioral & Community Health, & Founding Director of the Center for Health Behavior Research at the Maryland School of Public Health, University of Maryland, College Park, MD. Dr Glover has more than 200 publications and approximately $33 million dollars in grant funding to his credit. He maintains a keen interest in the physician's role in smoking cessation & has delivered over 550 invited medical grand rounds/workshops on the subject to physicians throughout the world. Moreover, he has delivered over 335 national & international professional presentations to various medical & health professional organizations. 

Education and Training

B.A.      Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX – 1969        (Health Education)

M.A.     Texas A & I University, Kingsville, TX – 1972       (Health Education)

Ph.D.    Texas Woman’s University, Denton, TX – 1977    (Health Education)

Additional Training:

Structured Clinical Interview for Axis I DSM-IV Disorder (SCID)

Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI)

Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D)

Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A)

Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS)

NIH’s Human Participants Protection Education for Research Teams Training

Association of Clinical Research Professionals, Good Clinical Practices for Clinical Investigators 

Courses

HLTH 688W Professional Writing

Honors and Awards

Named the 2003 Distinguished Scholar for AAHE, the 2005 Alliance Scholar for AAHPERD, selected by the University of Maryland as a “Rainmaker” which designates a Research Leader, and in 2008 received the coveted American Academy of Health Behavior Research Laureate Medallion for his contribution to health behavior research. As the founder of the American Academy of Health Behavior he was also awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award by the Academy.

Publications: 

Hurt RD, Sachs DPL, Glover ED, Offord KP, Johnston JA, Dale LC, Khayrallah MA, Schroeder DR, Glover PN, Sullivan CR, Croghan IT, Sullivan PM.  A comparison of sustained-release bupropion & placebo for smoking cessation.  New England Journal of Medicine, 337:1195-1202.

Daughton D, Fortmann S, Glover ED, Hatsukami D, Heatley S, Lichtenstein E, Repsher L, MillatmalT, Killen J, Nowak R, Ullrich F, Rennard S.  The smoking cessation efficacy of varying doses of nicotine patch delivery systems four years to five years post quit day.  Preventive Medicine, 28:113-119.

Hayford KE, Patten CA, Rummans TA, Schroeder DR, Offord KP, Croghan IT, Glover ED, Sachs DPL, Hurt RD.  Effectiveness of bupropion for smoking cessation in subjects with a history of majordepression or alcoholism. British Journal of Psychiatry, 174:173-178.

Dale LC, Glover ED, Sachs DPL, Schroeder DR, Offord KP, Croghan IT, Hurt RD.  Bupropion for smoking cessation—predictors of successful outcome.  Chest, 119:1357-1364.

Johnston JA, Fiedler-Kelly J, Glover ED, Sachs DPL, Grasela T, DeVeaugh-Geiss J.  Relationship between drug exposure and the efficacy and safety of bupropion sustained release for smoking cessation.  Nicotine & Tobacco Research, 3(2):131-140.

Glover ED, Glover PN, Sullivan CR, Cerullo C, Hobbs GR.  A comparison of sustained-release bupropion & placebo for smokeless tobacco cessation. American Journal of Health Behavior, 26;(5):386-393.

Glover ED, Glover PN, Franzon M, Sullivan CR, Cerullo CL, Howell RM, Keyes GG, Nilsson F, Hobbs GR.  A comparison of a nicotine sublingual tablet & placebo for smoking cessation. Nicotine & Tobacco Research, 4:441-450.

Rennard SI, Glover ED, Leischow S, Daughton D, Glover PN, Muramoto M, Franzon F, Danielsson T, Landfeldt B, Westin A. Efficacy of nicotine inhaler in smoking reduction: a double-blind, randomized trial. Nicotine & Tobacco Research, 8(4):555-564.

Glover ED, Glover PN, Laflin M, Nochur SV, Strnad JV.  Sensitivity and specificity of a reagent-impregnated test strip in identifying smokeless tobacco users. Nicotine & Tobacco Research, 9(4):499-503.

Glover ED, Laflin MT, Schuh KJ, Schuh L, Nides M, Christen AG, Glover PN, Strnad JV.  A randomized, controlled trial to assess the efficacy and safety of a transdermal delivery system of nicotine/mecamylamine in cigarette smokers. Addiction, 102:795-802.

Glover ED, Rath J, Sharma E, Glover PN, Laflin MT, Tønnesen P, Repsher L, Quiring J.  A multi-center, phase-3 trial of lobeline sulfate for smoking cessation. American Journal of Health Behavior, 34(1):101-109.

Hatsukami DK, Jorenby DE, Gonzales D, Rigotti N, Glover ED, Oncken C, Tashkin D, Reus V, Akhavain R, Fahim REF, Kessler PD, Niknian M, Kalnik MW, Rennard SI. Immunogenicity and smoking cessation outcomes for a novel nicotine immunotherapeutic: anti-nicotine elicited antibodies enhance quitting and support long-term abstinence. Clinical Pharmacology Therapeutics, DOI 1038/clpt.2010.317.

Kahn R, Gorgon L, Jones K, McSherry F, Glover ED, Anthenelli RM, Jackson T, Williams J, Murtaugh C, Montoya I, Yu E, Elkashef A. Selegiline transdermal system (STS) as an aid for smoking cessation. Nicotine & Tobacco Research, 14(3):March 2012;377-382. DOI:10.1093/ntr/ntr143.

Ebbert JO, Severson HH, Danaher BG, Schroeder DR, Glover ED. A comparison of three smokeless tobacco dependence measures. Addictive Behaviors, 37(2012):1271-1277.

Professor, Behavioral and Community Health
Director of Educational Innovation
Other Affiliations: Center for Health Equity, Horowitz Center for Health Literacy
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1234Q
Phone: 301-405-2517 |
Office Hours: 

8:30 – 10:00 a.m. MWF

CV / Resume
PDF icon Resume – RS Gold 060314.pdf
Biography

Robert S. Gold was the Founding Dean of the University of Maryland School of Public Health (UMD SPH), and Director of the Public Health Informatics Research Laboratory. As Dean, he was responsible for the creation of the University of Maryland Global Public Health College Park Scholars Program, and during his tenure, the school created the post-baccalaureate Certificate Program in Global Public Health.

He currently serves as University of Maryland Professor with appointments as: Professor in the Department of Behavioral and Community Health (Primary), and Department of Medicine (Secondary), University of Maryland School of Medicine. Dr. Gold is Co-Director of the UMCP Center of Excellence for Health Information Technology Research, and Director of the UMCP/SPH Public Health Informatics Research Laboratory. He served as chair of the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics from 2013-2017. Dr. Gold’s own research focuses on health communications projects and numerous technology development projects in the areas of asthma, cancer prevention, diabetes, HIV prevention, injury and violence prevention.

He has played a significant role in the oversight and conduct of a broad variety of national research studies such as the Government Project Officer, the National Children and Youth Fitness Studies I and II, the National School Health Education Evaluation Study, and the National Adolescent Student Health Survey. He has extensive experience in public health training, career development, mentorship, and research training of over 30 doctoral students.

Education and Training

SUNY at Brockport        B.S.      1969     Biology

SUNY at Brockport        M.S.     1971     Health Education

University of Oregon     Ph.D.    1976     HLTH Ed / Comp. Sci.

Un. TX Health Science Ctr. School Public HLTH  Dr.P.H. 1980     Pub. HLTH Practice

Courses

EPIB 672: Introduction to Public Health Informatics (Syllabus)

Honors and Awards

President’s Medal, University of Maryland, College Park, October 2012.

Honorary Doctor of Sciences, State University of New York, June, 2012.

President– Society for Public Health Education.

John P. McGovern Medal for Distinguished Contributions to Health Education, American School Health Association, Honolulu, HI, July 2007

Elected Fellow, American School Health Association, October 2006.

Honor Award, Highest Award of Eta Sigma Gamma, The National Health Science Honorary Association.  Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Public Health Educators, 2004, Washington, D.C.

Health Education Hall of Fame.  Inducted November, 2002 at the Annual Meeting of the American Public Health Association, Philadelphia, PA.

Presidential Citation of Merit – Association for the Advancement of Health Education.  Presented at their annual meeting in Cincinnati, OH, March 2001.

Research and Development Award – College of Health and Human Performance, University of MD, May 2000.

Elected Fellow, American Academy of Health Behavior, February 1999.

Distinguished Service Award:  Eta Sigma Gamma - The National Health Science Honorary Association.  Presented at the annual meeting of Eta Sigma Gamma, 1991.

Key Leaders In Health Education: A Century of Commitment.  Eta Sigma Gamma, November 1990.

Researcher of the Year Award, American School Health Association.  Presented at the annual meeting of the American School Health Association, October 1989.

Distinguished Graduate Award.  University of Oregon, College of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation.  Presented 1988.

Distinguished Service Award, American School Health Association.  Presented at the annual meeting of the American School Health Association, October 1987.

Association for the Advancement of Health Education (AAHE) Scholar of the Year Award, April 1987

Publications: 
  1. Bernhardt JM, Alber J, Gold RS (2014) A Social Media Primer for Professionals: Digital Dos and Don'ts. Health Promot Pract 2014 Jan 6. [Epub ahead of print] DOI: 10.1177/1524839913517235.
  2. Gold RS (2013) The days are long and the years are short: a year in the shoes of a SOPHE president. Health Educ Behav 2013 Dec;40(6):640-5. DOI: 10.1177/1090198112473113. Epub 2013 Jan 23Tian, J., Atkinson, N.L., Portnoy, B., Gold, R.S.  (2007).  Systematic review of the current literature on formal CME evaluation studies.  Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions, 27(1):16-27.
  3. Saperstein, S.L., Atkinson, N.L., and Gold, R.S.  (2007) The impact of internet use for weight loss.  Obesity Reviews, 8, 459-465.
  4. Atkinson, N.L., Gold, R.S.  (2008).  Web 2.0 in health education preparation and practice and the responsible practitioner – A Reaction to Hanson et al.  American Journal of Health Education, 39(3), 190-191.
  5. Atkinson, N.L., Saperstein, S.L., Desmond, S.M., Gold, R.G. Billing, A.S., Tian, J.  2009.  Rural eHealth nutrition education for limited-income families:  An Iterative and User-centered Design Approach.  J Med Internet Res. Apr-Jun; 11(2): e21.
  6. Atkinson NL, Desmond SM, Saperstein, SL, Billing AS, Gold RS, and Tournas-Hardt A. (2010) Assets, Challenges, and the Potential of Technology for Nutrition Education in Rural Communities. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior. Volume 42 (6), 410-416.
  7. Atkinson NL, Desmond SM, Saperstein, SL, Billing AS, RS Gold, and Tournas-Hardt A. (2010) Assets, Challenges, and the Potential of Technology for Nutrition Education in Rural Communities. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior; 42 (6), 410-416.
  8. Shegog, R; Bartholomew, LK; Gold, RS; Pierrel, E; Parcel, GS; Sockrider, MM; Czyzewski, DI; Fernandez, ME; Berlin, NJ; Abramson, S. (2006) Asthma Management Simulation for Children: Translating Theory, Methods, and Strategies to Effect Behavior Change. Simulation in Healthcare: The Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare. 1(3):151-159.
  9. Shegog R, Bartholomew LK, Czyzewski DI, Sockrider MM, Craver J, Pilney S, Mullen PD, Koeppl P, Gold RS, Fernandez M, Abramson SL. (2004) Development of an expert system knowledge base: a novel approach to promote guideline congruent asthma care.  J Asthma;41(4):385-402.
  10. Bartholomew LK, Gold RS, Parcel GS, Czyzewski DI, Sockrider MM, Fernandez M, Shegog R, Swank P. Watch, Discover, Think, and Act: evaluation of computer-assisted instruction to improve asthma self-management in inner-city children. Patient Educ Couns. 2000 Feb;39(2-3):269-80.
  11. Bartholomew LK, Shegog R, Parcel GS, Gold RS, Fernandez M, Czyzewski DI, Sockrider MM, Berlin N. Watch, Discover, Think, and Act: a model for patient education program development. Patient Educ Couns. 2000 Feb;39(2-3):253-68.
College Park Professor, Family Science
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1142G School of Public Health
Phone: 301.405.8940 |
Office Hours: 

Contact via email to set up a time unless otherwise listed in Course Syllabus.

CV / Resume
PDF icon FG-vita2_11.pdf
Education and Training

Ph.D., Demography, University of Pennsylvania, 1971

Honors and Awards

• Awarded Distinguished Scholarship, American Sociological Association, Family Section (2007).

• Author/editor of 8 books, including Immigration, Gender and Family Transitions to Adulthood in Sweden (2007), The Changing Transition to Adulthood: Leaving and Returning Home (1999), Leaving Home Before Marriage: Ethnicity, Familism and Generational Relationships (1993), and New Families, No Families: The Transformation of the American Home (1991).

• Author of more than 100 articles and book chapters, with publications is such journals as Journal of Marriage and Family, Journal of Family Issues, Demography, Population Studies, American Sociological Review, and American Journal of Sociology.

• Author of research, center, and training grants and contracts totally over $9 million, including research on the transition to adulthood and on the family consequences of child disability.

• Former Director of the Population Studies and Training Center and Chair, Department of Sociology, Brown University; University Professor of Sociology, Brown; and Research Associate, RAND Corporation, University of Michigan, Stockholm University, Jerusalem University; Recipient of Fulbright Foundation awards for research in Sweden and Israel. Awarded 1993 Otis Dudley Duncan Award of the Population Section of the American Sociological Association for New Families, No Families.

• Editor, Demography 1994-95 (Vols. 31-32), Second Vice President of Population Association of America, 1991-92; board member, 1987-90, Member, Editorial Boards, Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 2001-5; Social Forces, 1995-98; Journal of Gerontology 1992-4; ASR, 1990-1992, 2005-08. Chair, Population Section of the American Sociological Association, 1988-89. Associate editor, Journal of Marriage and Family, 1987-2005. Member, Sociology Review Panel, National Science Foundation, 1984-86.

• Faculty Associate, Maryland Population Research Center • Research Associate, Child Trends

Publications: 

Goldscheider, F. K., & Kaufman, G. (2007). Do men 'need' marriage more than women? Perceptions of the importance of marriage for men and women. Sociological Quarterly, 48, 27-40.

Goldscheider, F. K., Short, S., & Miller, B. (2006). Less help for mother: The decline in adult support for the mothers of small children, 1880-2000. Demography, 43, 617-629.

Goldscheider, F. K., & Kaufman, G. (2006). Willingness to stepparent: Attitudes toward partners who already have children. Journal of Family Issues, 27(10), 1415-1436.

Goldscheider, F. K., & Sassler, S. (2006). Creating stepfamilies: Integrating children into the study of union formation. Journal of Marriage and Family, 68, 275-291.

Goldscheider, F. K., Hogan, D., & Turcotte, P. (2006). The other partner: The changing role of 'good provider' in men’s union formation patterns in industrialized countries. Canadian Studies in Population, 33(1), 25-48.

Goldscheider, F. K., & Bures, R. (2003). The racial crossover in family complexity in the US. Demography, 40(3),569-587.

Abroms, L. C., & Goldscheider, F. K. (2002). More work for mother: How spouses, cohabiting partners, and relatives affect the hours mothers work. Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 23, 144-166.

Goldscheider, F. K., Thornton, A., & Yang, L. S. (2001). Helping out the kids: Expectations about parental support in young adulthood. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 63, 727-740.

Goldscheider, F. K., & Hogan, D. (2001). Men’s flight from children in the US? A historical perspective. In S. Hofferth & T. Owens (Eds.), Advances in life course research, Vol. 6 (pp. 173-191). Oxford: Elsevier.

Goldscheider, F. K., & Goldscheider, C. (1999). Changes in returning home in the US, 1925-1985. Social Forces, 78, 695-720.

Goldscheider, F. K., & Kaufman, G. (1996). Fertility and commitment: Bringing men back in. In J. Casterline and R. Lee (Eds.), Fertility in the United States: New patterns, new theories. Population and Development Review, Special Supplement to Vol. 22, 87-99.

Goldscheider, F. K., & Goldscheider, C. (1991). The intergenerational flow of income: Family structure and the status of Black Americans. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 53, 499-508.

Goldscheider, F. K. (1990). The aging of the gender revolution: What do we know and what do we need to know? Research on Aging, 12. 531-545. (Reprinted in Sociological Footprints, by L. Cargan & J. Ballantine, Eds.)

Frey, W., & Kobrin, F. E. (1982). Changing families and changing mobility: Their impact on the central city. Demography, 19, 261-277.

Kobrin, F. E. (1981). Family extension and the elderly: Economic, demographic, and family cycle factors. Journal of Gerontology, 36, 370-377.

Kobrin, F. E., & Hendershot, G. E. (1977). Do family ties reduce mortality? Evidence from the United States, l966-l968. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 39, 737-745.

Instructor, Kinesiology
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health

Biography

Dr. Jay D. Goldstein serves on the faculty of the Department of Kinesiology, School of Public Health, The University of Maryland at College Park where he teaches “Managing Youth Programs: Sports, Fitness & Education” – an applied sport management class that focuses on creating innovative solutions to change the current youth sports culture using the “Project Play” Initiatives. Dr. Goldstein has worked in professional, amateur, collegiate and youth sports for the better part of the last 30 years, including co-founding his own sports marketing and event management company.

Dr. Goldstein earned his M.A. and Ph.D.in Kinesiology, with an emphasis in the psychology of sport from the University of Maryland at College Park. His area of expertise is the social psychology of youth sports, the study of the athlete, coach, and parent interactions related to development and performance.  He earned the Master’s Thesis Award from the Association of Applied Sports Psychology (AASP) in 2005.

(With all due respect to Julius Erving) Dr. Jay has taught at the university level, ranging from basketball and soccer instruction to teaching classes on sport and exercise psychology, children in sport, sport management, event marketing, as well as stress management.  He has published and presented his research nationally and internationally on such subjects as sideline rage in parents of youth athletes, and the use of coaching educational strategies and behaviors to foster positive youth development and enhance performance. 

Dr. Olga G. Goloubeva
Associate Professor (Joint Appointment), Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Associate Professor, Dept. of Epidemiology & Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine
Campus: UMB | Building: Howard Hall | Room: 111
Phone: (410)706-8502 |
Website: 
University of Maryland School of Medicine profile
Lecturer, Kinesiology
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: SPH 2361
Phone: (301) 405-2574 |
Laboratory Website: 
Physical Cultural Studies Laboratory
Office Hours: 

Monday 12:00-1:00pm; Wednesday 10:00am-11:00am; and by appointment.

CV / Resume
PDF icon Grainger CV - Fall 2017.pdf
Biography

Dr Andy Grainger completed his Masters degree in Sport and Leisure Studies at the University of Otago, New Zealand and a PhD in Physical Cultural Studies at the University of Maryland. He has gone on to teach courses in sport sociology, sport history, and sport management at universities in New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Dr Grainger's research and teaching interests are concerned with the critical, socio-historical analysis of sport, leisure, health, and physical culture.

Education and Training

MPhEd, Physical Education (Sport Studies), University of Otago

PhD, Kinesiology (Physical Cultural Studies), University of Maryland

Courses

Fall 2017:

KNES 287: Sport and American Society

KNES 485: Sport and Globalization

KNES 497: Kinesiology Senior Seminar

 

Assistant Research Professor, Applied Environmental Health (MIAEH)
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2326
Phone: 301-405-4081 |
Laboratory Website: 
Public Health Aerobiology, Virology, and Exhaled Biomarker Laboratory (PHAB Lab)
Biography

My research interests are in the assembly and transmission of virus particles. I am particularly interested in the molecular mechanisms that occur in order for influenza to assemble an infectious virus particle and for that particle to transmitted from one host to another. My previous work focused on the role of the cytoplasmic tail of the influenza M2 protein in the incorporation of the internal virus components. I have identified individual amino acids in the M2 cytoplasmic tail that are critical for that function, and future work will focus on identifying why those residues are critical. More recently, I have worked as part of a multidisciplinary team to capture and quantify influenza virus particles from infected human volunteers during an epidemic. In future work in this area, I would like to apply this technology to animal models of influenza (or other viruses) to begin to identify the molecular determinants of influenza aerosol generation.

I am also involved in an interdisciplinary effort to identify biomarkers that might be carried by a person who seeks to develop an influenza-base bioweapon. My role in this effort is to try to identify immune and microbiome signatures that are representative of someone who is engaged in influenza gain-of-function research.

Education and Training

Postdoctoral Fellow - Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health - Baltimore, MD

Postdoctoral Research Assistant - Washington University Medical School - St Louis, MO

Ph.D., Microbiology and Immunology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center - Shreveport, LA

B.S., Biology and Chemistry, Emporia State University - Emporia, KS

Courses

MIEH 321 - Syphilis to SARS: Climate Change, Development and Emergence of Infectious Diseases

Taught online in 2012, In-person at the Shady Grove campus in 2013 and 2014 and on the College Park Campus in 2015

SPHL 415 - Public Health Biology

Taught as a hybrid course on the Shady Grove campus in 2014

Publications: 

Milton DK, Fabian MP, Cowling BJ, Grantham ML, McDevitt JJ (2013) Influenza Virus Aerosols in Human Exhaled Breath: Particle Size, Culturability, and Effect of Surgical Masks. PLoS Pathog 9(3): e1003205. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1003205.

Grantham ML, Stewart SM, Lalime EN & Pekosz A. Tyrosines in the influenza A virus M2 protein cytoplasmic tail are critical for the production of infectious virus particles. (2010) Tyrosines in the influenza a virus m2 protein cytoplasmic tail are critical for production of infectious virus particles. J Virol. 84, 8765-76.

Grandea AG III, Olsen OA, Cox  TC, Renshaw M, Hammond PW, Chan-Hui P-Y, Mitcham J, Cieplak W, Stewart SM, Grantham ML, Pekosz A, Hatta M, Kawaoka Y, & Moyle M. Human Antibodies Reveal a Protective Epitope that is Highly Conserved Among Human and Non-Human Influenza A Viruses. PNAS. 107, 12658-63.

Grantham ML, Wu WH, Lalime EN, Lorenzo M, Klein SL & Pekosz A. (2009) Palmitoylation of the influenza A virus M2 protein is not required for virus replication in vitro but contributes to virus virulence. J Virol. 83, 8655-61.

Muggeridge MI, Grantham ML & Johnson FB, (2004). Identification of syncytial mutations in a clinical isolate of herpes simplex virus 2. Virology 328, 244-253.

Fan ZF, Grantham ML, Smith MS, Anderson EA, Cardelli JA & Muggeridge MI. (2002). Truncation of herpes simplex virus type 2 glycoprotein B increases its cell surface expression and activity in cell-cell fusion, but these properties are unrelated. J Virol. 76, 9271-83.

Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2375
Phone: (301) 405-2524 |
Website: 
The Woodlawn Study
Office Hours: 

Office hours are by appointment.

Biography

As a prevention scientist, Dr. Green’s work has concentrated on improving the health and well-being of disadvantaged populations.  Specifically, her research has focused on identifying the causes of negative outcomes over the life course among urban African Americans.  Dr. Green’s work is concentrated in two areas: (1) long-term consequences of substance use and (2) the interrelationship of substance use, violence, and mental health over the life course.  Much of her work has been with the Woodlawn Study, a community cohort study that began in 1965 as a school-based intervention program and includes data spanning 45 years of the cohort’s lives.  Dr. Green coordinated the midlife follow-up in 2002-03, and has published extensively on this data with funding from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the National Institute on Aging, and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.  Critical aspects of her work involve identifying the prevention implications of findings and applying methodological advances, such as propensity score matching, to complex public health questions. 

Education and Training

2004-2006           Department of Mental Health, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

                            Post-Doctoral Training Program (T32MH18834)

                            Advisor: Nicholas Lalongo

2000-2004         Department of Health Policy & Management, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

                          Doctor of Philosophy Degree

                          Advisor: Margaret Ensminger

                          Dissertation: “The Effects of Adolescent Drug Use on Adult Role Functioning:

                          A Longitudinal Study Examining Gender Differences”

1997-1998         College of Education, Department of Human Development, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 

                           Master of Arts

                           Advisor: Melanie Killen

                           Master’s Thesis: “Children’s Judgments about Exclusion in Gender Stereotypic Situations”

1991-1995          College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA

                           Bachelor of Science     

                           Major: Psychology

 

Courses

Current:

HLTH 410: Community Health Honors Seminar

HONR238N: Contemporary Issues in Public Health

HLTH711: Advanced Research Methods in Health, Department of Behavioral and Community Health

Previous:

HLTH 301/EPIB301: Epidemiology for Public Health Practice, Department of Behavioral and Community Health/Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics

HLTH 300/EPIB300: Biostatistics for Public Health Practice, Department of Behavioral and Community Health

HLTH 106: Drug Use and Abuse (online), Department of Behavioral and Community Health

HLTH 688F: Prevention Science and Public Health, Department of Behavioral and Community Health

Honors and Awards

2014, Nominee, University of Maryland Graduate Faculty Mentor of the Year 

2011, Team Science Award, School of Public Health Research Interaction Day

2011, Recipient, Leda Amick Wilson Mentoring Award, Maryland School of Public Health

2010, Nominee, University of Maryland Graduate Faculty Mentor of the Year

2010, Honoree, University of Maryland Third Annual Celebration of Scholarship and Research

2009, George F. Kramer Practitioner of the Year Award, Maryland School of Public Health

2007-2012, Recipient, NIH Loan Repayment Program

2004, Inducted into Delta Omega, National Honor Society in Public Health

Publications: 

Green, K.M., Musci, R.J., Matson, P.A., Johnson, R.M., Reboussin, B.A., & Ialongo, N.S. (in press). Developmental patterns of adolescent marijuana and alcohol use and their joint association with sexual risk behavior and outcomes in young adulthood. Journal of Urban Health.

Green, K.M., Johnson, R.M., Milam, A.J., Furr-Holden, D.M., Ialongo, N.S., & Reboussin, B.A. (2016). Racial differences and the role of neighborhood in the sequencing of marijuana and tobacco initiation among urban youth. Substance Abuse.

Roberts, E.B., Butler, J., Green, K.M. (in press). Identifying and understanding indigenous ways of evaluating physical activity programs. American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research

Reboussin, B.A., Milam, A.J., Green, K.M., Ialongo, N.S., Furr-Holden, C.D.M. (2016). Clustering of black adolescent marijuana use in low-income, urban neighborhoods. Journal of Urban Health.

Green, K.M., Musci, R.J., Johnson, R.M., Matson, P.A., Reboussin, B.A., & Ialongo, N.S. (2016) Outcomes associated with adolescent marijuana and alcohol use among urban young adults: A prospective study.  Addictive Behavior.

Zebrak, K.A. & Green, K.M. (2016). Mutual influences between parental psychological distress and alcohol use and child problem behavior in a cohort of urban African Americans.  Journal of Family Issues.

Debnam, K.J., Howard, D.E., Garza, M.A., & Green, K.M. (in press).  African American girls’ ideal dating relationship now and in the future.  Youth and Society.  Online first. doi: 10.1177/0044118X14535417

Doherty, E.E., Cwick, J.M., Green, K.M., & Ensminger, M.E. (in press). Examining the consequences of the “prevalent life events” of arrest and incarceration among an urban African American cohort.  Justice Quarterly. 

Zebrak, K.A. & Green, K.M. (in press). Mutual influences between parental psychological distress and alcohol use and child problem behavior in a cohort of urban African Americans. Journal of Family Issues.

Fothergill, K.E., Ensminger, M.E., Doherty, E.E., Juon, H.S., & Green, K.M. (2016). Pathways from early childhood adversity to later adult drug use and psychological distress:  A prospective study of a cohort of African Americans. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 57(2) 223–239.

Reboussin, B.A., Green, K.M., Milam, A.J., Furr-Holden, D.M., Johnson, R.M., & Ialongo, N.S. (2015). The role of neighborhood in urban Black adolescent marijuana use. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 154, 69-75.

Assini-Meytin, L. & Green, K.M. (2015).  Long-term consequences of adolescent parenthood among African American urban youth: A propensity matching approach.  Journal of Adolescent Health, 56(5), 529-535.

Reboussin, B.A., Ialongo, N.S., Green, K.M.  (2015).  Influences of behavior and academic problems at school entry on marijuana use transitions during adolescence in an African American sample.  Addictive Behaviors, 41, 51-7.    

Coleman, B.N., Apelberg, B.J., Ambrose, B.K., Green, K.M., Choiniere, C.J., Bunnell, R., & King, B.A. (2015). Association between electronic cigarette use and openness to cigarette smoking among U.S. young adults. Nicotine & Tobacco Research, 17 (2): 212-218. doi:10.1093/ntr/ntu211

Reboussin, B.A., Green, K.M., Milam, A.J., Furr-Holden, D.M., Ialongo, N.S., (2014). Neighborhood environment and urban African American marijuana use during high school.  Journal of Urban Health, 91 (6), 1189-1201.

Green, K.M. & Stuart, E.A. (2014). Examining moderation analyses in propensity score methods: Application to depression and substance use. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 82(5), 773-83. 

Dagher, R. & Green, K.M. (2014). Does depression and substance abuse co-morbidity affect socioeconomic status? Evidence from a prospective study of urban African Americans.  Psychiatry Research, 225 (1-2), 115-121.  

Green, K.M., Fothergill, K.E., Robertson, J.A., Zebrak, K.A., Banda, D., Ensminger, M.E. (2013).  Early life predictors of adult depression in a community cohort of urban African Americans.  Journal of Urban Health, 90 (1), 101-115.  

Green, K.M., Doherty, E.E., Fothergill, K.E., & Ensminger, M.E. (2012). Marriage trajectories and health risk behaviors throughout adulthood among urban African Americans.  Journal of Family Issues, 33, 1595-1618.

Green, K.M., Zebrak, K.A., Fothergill, K.E., Robertson, J.A., & Ensminger, M.E. (2012).  Childhood and adolescent risk factors for comorbid depression and substance use disorders in adulthood.  Addictive Behavior, 37, 1240-1247.

Green, K.M., Zebrak, K. A., Robertson, J., Fothergill, K.E., & Ensminger, M.E. (2012).  Interrelationship of substance use and psychological distress over the life course among a cohort of urban African Americans. Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 123, 239-248.

Green, K.M., Doherty, E.E., Zebrak, K.A., & Ensminger, M.E. (2011). Association between adolescent drinking and adult violence:  Evidence from a longitudinal study of urban African Americans. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 72 (5), 701-710.

Green, K.M., Doherty, E.E., Reisinger, H.S., Chilcoat, H.D., & Ensminger, M.E. (2010).  Social integration in young adulthood and the subsequent onset of substance use and disorders among a community population of urban African Americans. Addiction, 105, 484-493.

Green, K.M., Doherty, E.E., Stuart, E.A., & Ensminger, M.E. (2010).  Does heavy adolescent marijuana use lead to criminal involvement in adulthood?  Evidence from a multiwave longitudinal study of urban African Americans.  Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 112, 117-125.

Stuart, E. & Green, K.M. (2008). Using full matching to estimate causal effects in nonexperimental studies: examining the relationship between adolescent marijuana use and adult outcomes.  Developmental Psychology, 44, 395-406.  

Green, K. M., & Ensminger, M. E. (2006).  Adult social behavioral effects of heavy adolescent marijuana use among African Americans.  Developmental Psychology, 42, 1168-1178.    

Green, K. M., Ensminger, M. E., Robertson, J. A., & Juon, H. S. (2006).  Impact of adult sons’ incarceration on African American mothers’ psychological distress.  Journal of Marriage and Family, 68, 430-441.

 

Building: School of Public Health

Department Manager, Family Science
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1142LL
Phone: 301.405.1377 |

To schedule an appointment with Dr. Elaine Anderson, Chair of the Department of Family Science, please contact Ms. Nacie Grigsby via email (ngrigsby@umd.edu) or by phone (301-405-1377). 

Assistant Dean for Finance and Administration, Office of the Dean
Campus: UMD | Building: SPH Bldg. | Room: 2242C
Phone: (301) 405-2443 |

Amanda Grimes recently joined the School of Public Health as its Assistant Dean of Finance and Administration.  Prior to joining the School, she served as the Executive Director of Administration for Biology and Director of Administration and External Affairs for the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC) at the University of Maryland, as well as a similar role for the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science – Chesapeake Biological Laboratory. She brings experience in finance, business operations, grants management, and human resources. She also managed diverse programs for capital projects, public outreach, and government affairs and served as a University Representative on the USM Women’s Forum.

Prior to joining the university system, she worked in the financial and information systems technology fields as a Vice President for Bank of America, Director for First Data Investor Services Group, and Assistant Vice President for Fifth Third Bank. In these roles, she served as a national account relationship manager in the capital markets arena.

Amanda received her BA in Economics and History from Centre College and her MBA from the University of Maryland, University College.

Ph.D.
Research Associate
Other Affiliations: UMD - Not within SPH
Campus: Off Campus | Building: 2116A Hornbake Library South
Phone: (301) 405-5628 |
Biography

Dr. Guha’s research interests are technology and design methods for children and families. Click here for Dr. Guha’s CV.

Professor, Kinesiology
Director of Graduate Studies; Director, STAR and ADAPT training programs
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2134E
Phone: (301) 405-2487 |
Website: 
STAR and ADAPT research training programs for minority undergraduate students
CV / Resume
Microsoft Office document icon Hagberg current CV.doc
Biography

Research Summary:
Jim Hagberg, PhD, is a Professor in the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Maryland, College Park School of Public Health. Dr Hagberg is also the Co-Chair of the University of Maryland Institutional Review Board (IRB). He is also a Professor of Geriatrics/Gerontology in the Division of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine and Baltimore Veterans Administration Medical Center. His major academic emphasis is research and teaching and he is and has been funded by NIH, the VA, the American Heart Association, and the US Olympic Committee. His graduate students, both Master's and Doctoral, are intimately involved in his research grant projects.

His current research addresses the effect of acute and chronic exercise on circulating angiogenic cells, a type of adult stem cell that has recently been recognized as a novel cardiovascular disease risk factor. His work involves functional, gene expression, and molecular studies under cell culture and ex vivo conditions using a number of pharmacologic inhibitors and activators in these cells isolated from a wide range of active and inactive individuals. Dr. Hagberg is also deeply committed to undergraduate teaching as evidenced by his KNES 260 course entitled "Science of Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Health" that he teaches as part of the campus-wide liberal arts CORE program. Dr Hagberg was one of six campus-wide UMCP Distinguished Scholar-Teachers for 2002-2003. In 2002, Dr Hagberg also received the University System of Maryland Regent's Award for Research. He also was awarded the American College of Sports Medicine Citation Award in 2004.

Affiliate Faculty, UMD Prevention Research Center
Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine
Campus: UMB | Building: | Room: UMD School of Medicine

Website: 
University of Maryland School of Medicine profile
Muhiuddin Haider
Clinical Professor in Global Health, Applied Environmental Health (MIAEH)
Other Affiliations: Public Health Science
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2242AA
Phone: 301-405-7431 |
Biography

Muhiuddin Haider, Ph.D., is a clinical professor in global health in the University of Maryland School of Public Health’s Institute for Applied Environmental Health. Since 2009, he has been teaching undergraduate courses under the Public Health Science and Global Health Scholars Programs, while also teaching graduate level courses in the Global Health Certificate Program offered through the University of Maryland School of Public Health. In addition to teaching, Dr. Haider is currently a co-investigator in Project HEAL: Health through Early Awareness and Learning, an intervention to increase cancer screening in African American faith-based communities in Prince Georges County, Maryland. He is also the Principal Investigator on a study to assess the US Public Health Service Commissioned Corps Officers’ value to public health.

Dr. Haider is a highly skilled public health professional who has managed and led diverse public health projects and research studies in more than a dozen countries worldwide over the past thirty years, on behalf of several international agencies and universities. He has assisted multi-sector initiatives to advance the delivery of quality health care services in the areas of Avian Influenza, HIV/AIDS, TB, RH/FP, Malaria, and has developed expertise in the areas of health communication, health promotion, health education, and social marketing. His research into strategies of behavior change, application of social marketing tools and communications capacity building has led to several acclaimed publications.

He has led major public health projects in several countries in Africa and Asia, for which he utilized technical skills to stimulate innovative and culturally sensitive approaches grounded in organizational and technical soundness. His recent research and programmatic work has focused on avian and pandemic influenza, for which he has contributed to creating and adapting IEC, BCC, and IPC training materials to establish and implement best practices within public health care systems and promote public-private partnerships. 

Dr. Haider has worked collaboratively on numerous occasions with counterparts in the veterinary and agriculture sectors and has advanced the "One World, One Health" framework through curriculum development, targeted coursework for public health students, and the development of a concept paper endorsed by the DOD Veterinary Service Activity, Princeton University based One Health Initiative Advocacy Group, Agricultural Research Service, DOA, and WHO. Dr. Haider has developed and conducted training sessions for Media/Health Reporting, with special focus on AI through DOS/VOA and IBB. Recently, Dr Haider was awarded a Fulbright Scholar Grant to assist the Ecuadorian Nutritional Program, Universidad De Saint Francisco in Quito.

Education and Training

1980   Ph.D., The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Population Education/Communication

1976   M.S., The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Population Planning

1974   M.A., Michigan State University, East Lansing, Communications

1969   M.A., The University of Dhaka, Bangladesh, Sociology

1968   B.A., The University of Dhaka, Bangladesh, Sociology, with Honors

Courses

MIEH400 Introduction to Global Health

MIEH605 Fundamentals of Global Health

Publications: 

1. Haider, M., Patel, M., Bhattacharje, P, Bassa, M. The Impacts of Biotechnology on Biodiversity in Global Health: A Case Study on Avian Influenza in Bangladesh. International Journal of Public Health Science, 4(2), 102-112. June 2015

2. Haider, M. & Frank, J. Firearms: Ownership, Laws, and The Case for Community Mobilization. International Journal of Public Health Science 3(1), 7-14. March 2014.

3. Haider, M. & Bassa, M. Immunizations. In T. L. Thompson (Ed.), Encyclopedia of health communication (Vol. 3, pp. 697-699). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications Ltd. doi: 10.4135/9781483346427.n269. 2014.

4. Sarkar, M., Haider, M. The Case for Microcredit: Does It Improve Maternal and Child Health and Wellbeing? International Journal of Public Health Science 3(2), 107-116. 2014.

5. Shubair, M., Haider, M., Bassa, M. Climate Change and Type 2 Diabetes. Journal of Endocrinology and Diabetes Mellitus 1(22-26). 2013.

6. Mahdavi, A. R., Etemad, K., Haider, M., and Alavinia, S. M. The Effect of Seeing a Family Physician on Glycosylated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients. Journal of Diabetes & Metabolic Disorders, 12(2), doi:10.1186/2251-6581-12-2. 2013.

7. Alavinia, S.M., Etemad, K., Mahdavi, A., Omidvar, M., Imanpour, S., Rahman, R., Haider, M., Frank, J., Gestational diabetes mellitus in Iran - experience from the National Diabetes Program. International Journal of
 Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing 6(2), 156 – 166. 2012.

8. Haider, M. Bangladesh Communication Strategy on HIV/AIDS Prevention.  Journal of Bangladesh Medical Research Bulletin.  August 2008

9. Haider, M. Bangladesh Rural Advancement committee (BRAC): Organizational Innovation in Population, Health and Development in Bangladesh in the context of the Millennium Development Goals.  BRAC University Journal.  IV (1).  2007.

10. Haider, M. Avian Influenza in Bangladesh.  International Journal of Pharma and Health Care Marketing.  Montclair, New Jersey, December, 2008.

Executive Administrative Assistant, Kinesiology
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health
Phone: (301) 405-2450 |
Professor, Kinesiology
Chair of Kinesiology; Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs
Other Affiliations: Center on Aging
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2351 SPH Bldg.
Phone: 301-405-2485 |
CV / Resume
File Hatfield CV Nov. 28. 2017.docx
Biography

 

Dr. Bradley Hatfield is Professor and Chair of the Department of Kinesiology and Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs in the School of Public Health at the University of Maryland, College Park with adjunct appointments in the Neuroscience and Cognitive Sciences (NACS) as well as the Center on Aging and a secondary appointment in the School of Medicine (Department of Epidemiology and Public Health).  He received his PhD in 1982 from the Pennsylvania State University where he was supported by the Research Council of Canada as a doctoral fellow and a Master of Sport Administration degree from the College of Business at Ohio University in addition to a Master of Science degree from Penn State. He holds two bachelor’s degrees in Physical Education and Psychology from the University of New Brunswick in Canada.

His research is focused on: (1) exercise and the aging brain as well as (2) brain dynamics underlying cognitive-motor performance using a cognitive neuroscience approach to address these topics via brain imaging techniques such as electroencepahalography (EEG), event-related potentials (ERPs), magnetoencephalography (MEG), and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). He has published in a number of scholarly journals including Neuroimage, Cerebral Cortex, Psychophysiology, Biological Psychology, Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Neurobiology of Aging, Experimental Brain Research, Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews, Journal of Gerontology, Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology, and others and currently holds membership on the editorial boards of the Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, Psychology of Sport and Exercise, Sport Exercise and Performance Psychology, and the Journal of Contemporary Athletics, while also serving as a grant reviewer for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the National Science Foundation (NSF) and numerous scholarly journals. Dr. Hatfield’s research efforts have been supported by the Department of Defense – Army Research Office (ARO), and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) as well as the U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences, the American Heart Association, the Erickson Foundation, and the Johns Hopkins University Center for Health and Information Technology.

His current research is focused on 1) the assessment of cognitive load based on cerebral cortical dynamics during motor performance (funded by Lockheed-Martin Corporation) and 2) the role of physical activity and genetics in mental health.  Dr. Hatfield served as president of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity (NASPSPA) and the Mid-Atlantic chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine from which he recently received the Honor Award (2013). He is a Fellow and President-elect of the National Academy of Kinesiology, and Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine, the Research Consortium of the American Alliance of Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance (AAHPERD), and he is a charter Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Applied Sport Psychology (AAASP).             

 

Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2234H
Phone: (301) 405-2551 |
Biography

Dr. He's current research focuses on longitudinal data analysis, time-to-event data analysis, nonparametric and semiparametric methods, as well as applications in epidemiology, environmental health, and biomedical studies.

Active Research Funding:

2017-2022
Co-Investigator: R01 MD012778 "Culturally Adapted Multilevel Decision Support Navigation Trial to Reduce Colorectal Cancer Disparity among At-Risk Asian American Primary Care Patients" funded by National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (PI: Lee, S.)

2016-2021
Subcontract Principal Investigator: R01 AI119012 "Lubricant Use and the Vaginal Microbiome" via University of Maryland, Baltimore (Prime Sponsor: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; PI: Brotman, R.M.)

2015-2020
Subcontract Principal Investigator: R01 AI116799 "Longitudinal Study of the Vaginal Microbiome Prior to Incident STI" via University of Maryland, Baltimore (Prime Sponsor: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; PI: Brotman, R.M.)

2014-present
Site Principal Investigator: "The Epidemiology of Concussions in Ivy League/Big Ten Sports: A Web-Based Registry" funded by The Council of Ivy League Presidents and The Big Ten Conference (Co-PI: Klossner, D.)

Editorial Boards:

2015-present
Associate Editor, Lifetime Data Analysis

2015-2017
Editor-in-Chief, International Chinese Statistical Association (ICSA) Bulletin

Education and Training

2003-2007    Ph.D. in Statistics, University of Missouri
2000-2003    B.A. in Economics, Peking University, Beijing, China
1999-2003    B.S. in Statistics, Peking University, Beijing, China

Courses

EPIB 650: Biostatistics I (Syllabus)
EPIB 653: Applied Survival Data Analysis (Syllabus)
EPIB 655: Longitudinal Data Analysis (Syllabus)
EPIB 786: Capstone Project in Public Health
EPIB 798: Independent Study
EPIB 799: Master's Thesis Research
EPIB 898: Pre-Candidacy Research

Honors and Awards

2017
ICSA Outstanding Service Award
International Chinese Statistical Association

2016
Summer Research and Scholarship Award (RASA)
Graduate School, University of Maryland

2014-2015
Leda Amick Wilson Mentoring Award
School of Public Health, University of Maryland

2015
Honoree
Eighth Annual University-Wide Celebration of Scholarship and Research, University of Maryland

2013
Delta Omega Public Health Honor Society

2011-2012
Doris W. Sands Excellent Teaching Award
School of Public Health, University of Maryland

2008
Excellence in Teaching Award
College of Public Health, The Ohio State University

2008
Best Contributed Paper Award
Winemiller 2008 Conference on Survival Analysis and Its Applications, University of Missouri

2007
ENAR Distinguished Student Paper Award
International Biometric Society (Eastern North American Region)

2007
ASA Section on Statistics in Epidemiology Travel Award (Student Paper Award)
American Statistical Association

2006
ICSA Student Award (Student Paper Award)
International Chinese Statistical Association

2005
Outstanding Performance on Doctoral Examinations Award
University of Missouri

2003-2007
G. Ellsworth Huggins Fellowship
Graduate School, University of Missouri

Publications: 

Google Scholar: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=S5_9AAoAAAAJ&hl=en

My Bibliography at NCBI: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/myncbi/browse/collection/48065308/?sort=date...

(Selected from 60+ publications)

He, X., Feng, X., Tong, X., and Zhao, X. (2017). Semiparametric partially linear varying coefficient models with panel count data. Lifetime Data Analysis 23, 439-466.

O'Neal, C.R., Weston, L.C., He, X., Huang, K.-Y., Pine, D.S., Kamboukos, D., and Brotman, L.M. (2017). Change in depression from preadolescence to adolescence: The role of early anger socialization and child anger among low-income, ethnic minority families. Journal of Adolescence 59, 1-7.

Rosenberg Goldstein, R.E., Kleinfelter, L., He, X., Micallef, S.A., George, A., Gibbs, S.G., and Sapkota, A.R. (2017). Higher prevalence of coagulase-negative staphylococci carriage among reclaimed water spray irrigators. Science of the Total Environment 595, 35-40.

Kumar, V., Min, J.K., He, X., and Raman, S.V. (2017). Computation of calcium score with dual-energy computed tomography: A phantom study. Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography 41, 156-158.

Raman, S.V., Hor, K.N., Mazur, W., He, X., Kissel, J.T., Smart, S., McCarthy, B., Roble, S.L., and Cripe, L.H. (2017). Eplerenone for early cardiomyopathy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: results of a two year open-label extension trial. Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases 12, Article 39.

Li, Y., He, X., Wang, H., and Sun, J. (2016). Regression analysis of longitudinal data with correlated censoring and observation times. Lifetime Data Analysis 22, 343-362.

Yao, B., Wang, L., and He, X. (2016). Semiparametric regression analysis of panel count data allowing for within-subject correlation. Computational Statistics & Data Analysis 97, 47-59.

Nowak, R.G., Gravitt, P.E., He, X., Ketende, S., Dauda, W., Omuh, H., Blattner, W.A., Charurat, M.E.; TRUST Study Group. (2016). Prevalence of anal high-risk human papillomavirus infections among HIV-positive and HIV-negative men who have sex with men (MSM) in Nigeria. Sexually Transmitted Diseases 43, 243-248.

Jaschek, G., Carter-Pokras, O., He, X., Lee, S., and Canino, G. (2016). Association of child maltreatment and depressive symptoms among Puerto Rican youth. Journal Child Abuse & Neglect 58, 63-71.

Jaschek, G., Carter-Pokras, O.D., He, X., Lee, S., and Canino, G. (2016). Association of types of life events with depressive symptoms among Puerto Rican youth. PLOS ONE 11, Article e0164852.

He, X., Whitmore, G.A., Loo, G.Y., Hochberg, M.C., and Lee, M.-L.T. (2015). A model for time to fracture with a shock stream superimposed on progressive degradation: the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures. Statistics in Medicine 34, 652-663.

He, X., Chen, L., Lei, L., Xia, H.A., and Lee, M.-L.T. (2015). A simple method for estimating confidence intervals for exposure adjusted incidence rate and its applications to clinical trials. Journal of Biometrics & Biostatistics 6, Article 238.

Li, Y., He, X., Wang, H., Zhang, B., and Sun, J. (2015). Semiparametric regression of multivariate panel count data with informative observation times. Journal of Multivariate Analysis 140, 209-219.

Xiao, T., Whitmore, G.A., He, X., and Lee, M.-L.T. (2015). The R Package threg to implement threshold regression models. Journal of Statistical Software 66, 1-16.

Zang, C., He, X., and Liu, H. (2015). Selective disclosure of HIV status in egocentric support networks of people living with HIV/AIDS. AIDS and Behavior 19, 72-80.

Wu, F., He, X., Guida, J., Xu, Y., and Liu, H. (2015). Network stigma towards people living with HIV/AIDS and their caregivers: an egocentric network study in China. Global Public Health 10, 1032-1045.

Raman, S.V., Hor, K.N., Mazur, W., Halnon, N., Kissel, J.T., He, X., Tran, T., Smart, S.,  McCarthy, B., Taylor, M.D., Jefferies, J.L., Rafael-Fortney, J.A., Lowe, J., Roble, S.L., and Cripe, L.H. (2015). Eplerenone for early cardiomyopathy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a randomised, placebo-controlled trial. The Lancet Neurology 14, 153-161.

Raman, S.V., Sharkey-Toppen, T.P., Tran, T., Liu, J.X., McCarthy, B., He, X., Smart, S., Gulati, M., Wexler, R., Simonetti, O.P., and Jackson, R.D. (2015). Iron, in ammation and atherosclerosis risk in men vs. perimenopausal women. Atherosclerosis 241, 249-254.

Shaw, K.S., Sapkota, A.R., Jacobs, J.M., He, X., and Crump, B.C. (2015). Recreational swimmers' exposure to Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, USA. Environment International 74, 99-105.

He, X., Lu, X., Chen, S., Hochberg, M.C., and Lee, M.-L.T. (2014). Association between obesity, race and knee osteoarthritis: The Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study. International Journal of Statistics in Medical Research 3, 224-230.

Brotman, R.M., He, X., Gajer, P., Fadrosh, D., Sharma, E., Mongodin, E.F., Ravel, J., Glover, E.D., and Rath, J.M. (2014). Association between cigarette smoking and the vaginal microbiota: a pilot study. BMC Infectious Diseases 14, 471.

Liu, H., He, X., Levy, J., Xu, Y., Zang, C., and Lin, X. (2014). Psychological impacts among older and younger people living with HIV/AIDS in Nanning, China. Journal of Aging Research, 576592.

Crouser, E.D., Ono, C., Tran, T., He, X., and Raman, S.V. (2014). Improved detection of cardiac sarcoidosis using magnetic resonance with myocardial T2 mapping. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine 189, 109-112.

He, X. and Whitmore, G.A. (2013). Connecting threshold regression and accelerated failure time models. In Risk Assessment and Evaluation of Predictions, M.-L. T. Lee, M. Gail, R. Pfeiffer, G. Satten, T. Cai, and A. Gandy (Ed.), New York: Springer, 47-60.

Lee, S., Chen, L., He, X., Miller, M.J., and Juon, H.-S. (2013). A cluster analytic examination of acculturation and health status among Asian Americans in the Washington DC metropolitan area, United States. Social Science & Medicine 96, 17-23.

Fransen, M., Pérodin, J., Hada, J., He, X., and Sapkota, A. (2013). Impact of vehicular strike on particulate matter air quality: Results from a natural intervention study in Kathmandu valley. Environmental Research 122, 52-57.

Wu, T.T. and He, X. (2012). Coordinate ascent for penalized semiparametric regression on high-dimensional panel count data. Computational Statistics and Data Analysis 56, 25-33.

Xiao, T., Whitmore, G.A., He, X., and Lee, M.-L.T. (2012). Threshold regression for time-to-event analysis: The stthreg package. Stata Journal 12, 257-283.

Shah, S.,Weed, H.G., He, X., Agrawal, A., Ozer, E., and Schuller, D.E. (2012). Alcohol-related predictors of delirium after major head and neck cancer surgery. Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery 138, 266-271.

Jordan, R., Lingen, M., Perez-Ordonez, B., He, X., Pickard, R., Inman, A., Koluder, M., Jiang, B., Wakely, P., Xiao, W., and Gillison, M.L. (2012). Validation of methods for oropharyngeal cancer HPV status determination in US cooperative group trials. The American Journal of Surgical Pathology 36, 945-954.

Pickard, R., Xiao, W., Broutian, T.R., He, X., and Gillison, M.L. (2012). The prevalence and incidence of oral human papillomavirus infection among young men and women, age 18-30 years. Sexually Transmitted Diseases 39, 559-566.

Rosenberg Goldstein, R.E., Micallef, S.A., Gibbs, S.G., Davis, J.A., He, X., George, A., Kleinfelter, L.M., Schreiber, N.A., Mukherjee, S., Sapkota, A., Joseph, S.W., and Sapkota, A.R. (2012). Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) detected at four U.S. wastewater treatment plants. Environmental Health Perspectives 120, 1551-1558.

He, X. (2011). Comments on: Nonparametric inference based on panel count data. TEST 20, 46-47.

Broutian, T.R., He, X., and Gillison, M.L. (2011). Automated high throughput DNA isolation for detection of human papillomavirus in oral rinse samples. Journal of Clinical Virology 50, 270-275.

Mihai, G., He, X., Zhang, X., McCarthy, B, Tran, T., Pennell, M.L., Blank, J., Simonetti, O.P., Jackson, R.D., and Raman, S.V. (2011). Design and rationale for the study of changes in iron and atherosclerosis risk in perimenopause. Journal of Clinical & Experimental Cardiology 2, 152.

He, X. and Lee, M.-L.T. (2010). First-hitting-time based threshold regression. In International Encyclopedia of Statistical Science, M. Lovric (Ed.), New York: Springer, 523-524.

Anderson, S.E., He, X., Schoppe-Sullivan, S. and Must, A. (2010). Externalizing behavior in early childhood and body mass index from age 2 to 12 years: longitudinal analyses of a prospective cohort study. BMC Pediatrics 10, 49.

Raman, S.V., Simonetti, O.P., Winner III, M.W., Dickerson, J.A., He, X., Mazzaferri Jr, E.L., and Ambrosio, G. (2010). Cardiac magnetic resonance with edema imaging identifies myocardium at risk and predicts worse outcome in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. Journal of the American College of Cardiology 55, 2480-2488.

He, X., Tong, X., and Sun, J.  (2009). Semiparametric analysis of  panel count data with correlated observation and follow-up times. Lifetime Data Analysis 15, 177-196.

Tong, X., He, X. (corresponding author), Sun, L., and Sun, J. (2009).  Variable selection for panel count data via non-concave penalized estimating function. Scandinavian Journal of Statistics 36, 620-635.

He, X., Tong, X., Sun, J., and Cook, R. (2008). Regression analysis of multivariate panel count data. Biostatistics 9, 234-248.

Tong, X., He, X., Sun, J., and Lee, M.-L.T. (2008). Joint analysis of current status and marker data: an extension of a bivariate threshold model. The International Journal of Biostatistics 4, Article 21.

Sun, J., Tong, X., and He, X. (2007). Regression analysis of panel count data with dependent observation times. Biometrics 63, 1053-1059.

Faculty Assistant, Behavioral and Community Health
Office of Planning and Evaluation
Other Affiliations: Center on Young Adult Health and Development, Office of the Dean
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: Center on Young Adult Health and Development, SPH 1242CC
Phone: 301-405-9778 |
Biography

Katie Hippen is a Faculty Assistant at the Center on Young Adult Health and Development (CYAHD) at the University of Maryland School of Public Health. Katie holds an M.A. in Sociology from Georgia State University, with a concentration in family, health, and life course. Her master's thesis was titled, “Attitudes Toward Marriage and Long-term Relationships Across Emerging Adulthood.”  She also holds a B.S. in Family Science from the University of Maryland, with minors in Human Development and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies. Katie is enrolled part-time in the Couple and Family Therapy M.S. program in the department of Family Science, though she hopes to complete her degree requirements soon.

Senior Faculty Specialist , Behavioral and Community Health
Undergraduate Program Director and Advisor
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2374
Phone: (301) 405-2523 |
Office Hours: 

By appointment only, via department’s website.

Biography

Jenny Hodgson serves as the Undergraduate Program Director and Advisor for the Department of Behavioral and Community Health. Working in this capacity since 2010, she appreciates the multifaceted nature of her role, collaborating on the logistics and development of the Community Health undergraduate program while advising future public health practitioners. She truly enjoys working with undergraduates to help them navigate their college experience to reach their goals.

As an alum from the department (B.S. and MPH), Jenny was thrilled at the opportunity to help shape the undergraduate experience for our students and share her enthusiasm for public health. Prior, she worked for a contract research organization, addressing patient issues in access to vaccines, and later was employed as a policy analyst contractor for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). At SAMHSA, she worked on many projects, including those surrounding the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act, as well as privacy, confidentiality, and security issues related to health information technology. Jenny also has a specific interest in worksite health promotion, and had an opportunity develop an employee wellness program for one of her previous employers. Her capstone project for her MPH focused on encouraging the implementation of employee wellness programs to small and medium-sized companies without them. 

Jenny is proud to have been the recipient of the UMD Outstanding Academic Advisor Award in 2011 and the SPH Gloria Friedgen School Spirit Award in 2016.

The courses she has taught at UMD include HLTH106: Drug Use and Abuse; HLTH476: Death Education; and SPHL498M: Public Health in Practice.

Education and Training

MPH, University of Maryland, Department of Behavioral and Community Health

B.S. in Community Health, University of Maryland, Department of Behavioral and Community Health

Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES)

Courses

HLTH106: Drug Use and Abuse

HLTH476: Death Education

SPHL498M: Public Health in Practice 

Honors and Awards

UMD Outstanding Academic Advisor Award, 2011 

SPH Gloria Friedgen School Spirit Award, 2016

Professor Emerita, Family Science
Campus: UMD | Building: Morrill Hall | Room: 2105 - Maryland Population Research Center

Laboratory Website: 
Maryland MCH Research Collaborative
Website: 
Social Observatories Coordinating Network
Office Hours: 

Tuesdays, 10-12, 1-3 p.m.; otherwise by appointment. Please contact via email to set up an appointment.

CV / Resume
Microsoft Office document icon CV_Hofferth_March2016.doc
Biography

Dr. Hofferth is Professor, Department of Family Science, University of Maryland at College Park. Dr. Hofferth received her Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of North Carolina in 1976. From 1983 to 1988 Hofferth served as Health Scientist Administrator in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. From 1977 to 1983 and from 1988 to 1994 she was Research Associate and then Senior Research Associate at the Urban Institute in Washington, DC, where she directed the National Child Care Survey 1990 and collaborated on A Profile of Child Care Settings. From 1994 to 2001 she was Senior Research Scientist at the Institute for Social Research of the University of Michigan where she co-directed the Michigan Panel Study of Income Dynamics and directed its Child Development Supplement. Hofferth has researched family issues in the context of public policy for more than 35 years. In 2012 she was awarded the Distinguished Career Award, sponsored by the American Sociological Association Family Section, for outstanding contributions to the Sociology of Family. She has served on the Policy Council of the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management, as Vice President of the Population Association of America, and as Chair of the American Sociological Association’s Sociology of Children Section. She has published 3 books and more than 100 articles and book chapters. She is currently Principal Investigator on a project funded by NICHD to provide web-based access to data from the American Time Use Survey and international time use studies. She is principal investigator on an NSF-funded Research Coordination Network to explore the establishment of Social Observatories in the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences.

Education and Training

Ph.D., Sociology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1976

2013-present, Director, Maternal and Child Health Program, Department of Family Science, School of Public Health, University of Maryland

2013-2014, ADVANCE Professor, School of Public Health

2008-2012, Director, Maryland Population Research Center, University of Maryland, College Park, MD

2001- present, Professor, Department of Family Science, School of Public Health, the University of Maryland, College Park, MD

1994-2001, Co-Director, Michigan Panel Study of Income Dynamics, the University of Michigan; Research Associate, Population Studies Center; and Adjunct Professor, Department of Sociology, the University of Michigan.

1994-2001, Senior Research Scientist, Institute for Social Research; Research

1992-1994, Senior Research Associate, Population Studies Center, The Urban Institute.

1988-1992, Senior Research Associate, Human Resources Policy Center, The Urban Institute.

1987-1988, Health Scientist Administrator, Demographic and Behavioral Sciences Branch, Center for Population Research, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

1983-1987, Expert, Demographic and Behavioral Sciences Branch, Center for Population Research, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

1981-1983, Senior Research Associate, Program for Policy Research on Women and Families, The Urban Institute.

1977-1981,, Research Associate I, Program for Policy Research on Women and Families, The Urban Institute.

Honors and Awards

• Author/editor of 5 books, including Handbook of Measurement Issues in Family Research, Children at the millennium: Where have we come from, where are we going? (2001), Caring for children in low-income families (1993), The National Child Care Survey, 1990 (1991), and Risking the future: Adolescent sexuality, pregnancy and childrearing (1987).

• Author of more than 100 articles and book chapters, with publications in such journals as Journal of Marriage and the Family, Population Research and Policy Review, Child Development, Journal of Policy Analysis & Management, Journal of Family Issues, Demography, Social Science Quarterly, Pediatrics, Work and Occupations, and Young Children.

• Author of grants and contracts totaling over $7 million, including research on child care and welfare reform.

• Recipient of College (HLHP) Research and Development Award, 2005.

• Testified three times on Capitol Hill during the Congressional debates on child care legislation and welfare reform.

• Former Co-Director of the Michigan Panel Study of Income Dynamics and founding Director of its Child Development Supplement, 1994-2001.

• Senior Research Associate at the Urban Institute in Washington, DC (1977-1983, 1988-1994), directing the National Child Care Survey (1990), and collaborating on A Profile of Child Care Settings.

• Health Scientist Administrator at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 1983-1988.

• Recipient of the Jensen Lectureship (1991-92), jointly sponsored by the American Sociological Association and Duke University, for research contributing to the goal of providing social action with a more rational grounding in tested knowledge.

• Past Vice President of the Population Association of America, and past Chair of the Sociology of Children Section of the American Sociological Association.

• Director, Maryland Population Research Center.

Publications: 

Hofferth, Sandra & Goldscheider, Frances. Family Heterogeneity over the Life Course. Handbook of Life Course Sociology, Volume II. Michael Shanahan, Jeylan Mortimer, and Monica Kirkpatrick Johnson (Eds.). Springer Press, 2015, forthcoming

Lee, Y., Hofferth, S., Flood, S., Fisher, K. Reliability, validity, and variability of the subjective well-being questions in the 2010 well-being module of the American Time Use Survey. Social Indicators Research, forthcoming. DOI: 10.1007/s11205-015-0923-8.

Conley, D., Aber, L, Brady, H., Cutter, S., Eckel, C., Entwisle, B., Hamilton, D., Hofferth, S., Hubacek,K., Moran, E., & Scholz, J. Big data, big obstacles.  The Chronicle of Higher Education. February 5, 2015. http://chronicle.com/article/Big-Data-Big-Obstacles/151421/?cid=cr&utm_source=cr&utm_medium=en.

Moran, E., Hofferth, S., Eckel, C., Hamilton, D., Entwisle, B. ,Aber, J. L., Brady, H.E., Conley, D., Cutter, S., Hubacek, K. & Scholz, J. Opinion: Building a 21st-century infrastructure for the social sciences.  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 111(45):15855-15856, November 11, 2014. www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1416561111.

Goldscheider, F., Hofferth, S., and Curtin, S.  Parenthood and leaving home in young adulthood.  Population Research and Policy Review 2014. DOI 10.1007/s11113-014-9334-9

Dagher, R., Hofferth, S., Lee, Y. Maternal depression, pregnancy intention, and return to paid work after childbirth. Women's Health Issues, 24(3), e297-e303, 2014. DOI: 10.1016/j.whi.2014.03.002

Cabrera, N. J, Hofferth, S. L., Hancock, G. Family structure, maternal employment and change in children's externalizing behavior: Differences by age and self-regulation. European Journal of Developmental Psychology, 11, 136-158, 2014.

Davis, R., Hofferth, S., and Shenassa, E. Gestational weight gain and risk of infant death in the United States. American Journal of Public Health, December 9, 2013: e1-e6, 2013. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2013.301425.

Hofferth, S., Pleck, J. H., and Vesely, C. The Transmission of Parenting from Fathers to Sons.  Parenting: Science and Practice 12 (4), 282-305, 2012. DOI: 10.1080/15295192.2012.709153

Hofferth, S. and Moon, U.J. Cell phone use and child and adolescent reading proficiency. Psychology of Popular Media Culture, 1(2), 108-122, 2012. DOI: 10.1037/a0027880.

Davis, R. R. and S.L. Hofferth.  The Association between Inadequate Gestational Weight Gain and Infant Mortality among U.S. Infants Born in 2002. Maternal and Child Health Journal, 16, 119-124, 2012. DOI 10.1007/s10995-010-0713-5.

Hofferth, S. and Moon, U.J.  Electronic Play, Study, Communication, and Adolescent Achievement, 2003-2008.  Journal of Research on Adolescence, 22 (2), 215-224, 2012. DOI: 10.1111/j.1532-7795.2011.00770.x.

 

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Professor, Behavioral and Community Health
Director, CHAMP (Community Health Awareness, Messages, and Prevention) Lab; Co-Director, Center for Health Behavior Research; Co-Leader for Population Science Program in the University of Maryland Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center
Other Affiliations: Center for Health Behavior Research, Horowitz Center for Health Literacy, UMD Prevention Research Center
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1234W
Phone: (301) 405-6659 |
Laboratory Website: 
Community Health Awareness, Messages, & Prevention (CHAMP)
Office Hours: 

By appointment.

Biography

Dr. Cheryl L. Holt, PhD, FAAHB is Professor in the Department of Behavioral and Community Health and Co-Director of the Center for Health Behavior Research, in the University of Maryland School of Public Health.  She is a member of the University of Maryland Greenebaum Comprehensvie Cancer Center and serves as Co-Leader of the Population Science program.  She is founding Director of the Community Health Awareness, Messages, and Prevention research lab.  Dr. Holt holds a secondary appointment in the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at the University of Maryland, School of Medicine.  Her health disparities research involves community-based health communication studies, and the role of culture in health cognitions and behaviors.  Dr. Holt’s research program has generated over $13 million in extramural support as Principal Investigator, from sources such as the NIH and ACS.  The program has resulted in over 99 peer-reviewed publications, most including student co-authors.  Dr. Holt’s research program involves community-engaged translational research in dissemination/implementation science, where she aims to find ways to increase use of evidence-based interventions in cancer control, primarily working through faith-based organizations.  Her research program also involves the scientific study of religious involvement in health among African Americans, which she uses to inform her intervention research..

Education and Training

Saint Louis University, Saint Louis, MO Doctorate in Applied/Experimental Psychology, Social Psychology Concentration, 1997-2001

East Tennessee University, Johnson City, Tennessee Masters in General Psychology 1995-1997

State University of New York College at Brockport, Brockport, New York Bachelor of Science in Psychology, minor in Sociology (Cum Laude) 1991-1995

Courses

Health Behavior, HLTH 230

Community Engaged Research, HLTH 498R

Health Behavior II, HLTH 666

Health Informatics and Communiction, HLTH 670

Professional Writing and Presentations, HLTH 742

Honors and Awards

2016: Best of the Best plenary session, International Cancer Education Conference

2016: Abstract Citation Award, Society of Behavioral Medicine

2013: Research and Development Award, University of Maryland, School of Public Health

2012: Fellow, American Academy of Health Behavior

2012: Delta Omega, National Honorary Society in Public Health, Gamma Zeta Chapter

2008:  Early Investigator Award for Spirituality and Health Research (Honorable Mention); Society of Behavioral Medicine

2003-2009: Student Loan Repayment Program in Health Disparities; National Institutes of Health

2003-2004: Fellow:  Cancer, Culture, and Literacy Institute, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 

Publications: 

Santos, S.L.Z., Tagai, E.K., Wang, M.Q., Scheirer, M.A., Slade, J.L., & Holt, C.L.  (In Press).  Feasibility of a web-based training system for peer community health advisors in cancer early detection among African Americans.  American Journal of Public Health.

Caplan, L., Sawyer, P., Holt, C.L., & Brown, C.  (In Press).  Religiosity after a diagnosis of cancer among older adults.  Journal of Religion, Spirituality & Aging.

Williams, B.R., Wang, M.Q., Schulz, E., Clark, E.M., & Holt, C.L.  (In Press).  Social integration and continuous health insurance among African American adults.  Journal of Women and Aging.

Dubay, D., Ivankova, N., Herby, I., Wynn, T.A., Kohler, C., Berry, B., Foushee, H., Carson, A., Redden, D.T., Holt, C.L., Siminoff, L., Fouad, M., & Martin, African American organ donor registration:  A mixed methods design using the Theory of Planned Behavior M.Y.  (In Press).  Progress in Transplantation.

Roth, D.L., Usher, T., Clark, E.M., & Holt, C.L.  (In Press).  Religious involvement and health over time:  Predictive effects in a national sample of African Americans.  Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion. 

Santos, S.L.Z., Tagai, E.K., Scheirer, M.A., Bowie, J., Haider, M., Slade, J.,…Holt, C.L. (2016). Adoption, reach, and implementation of a cancer education intervention in African American churches. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Scheirer, M.A., Santos, S.L.Z., Tagai, E.K., Bowie, J., Slade, J., Carter, R., & Holt, C.L. (2016). Dimensions of sustainability for a health communication intervention in African American churches: A multi-methods study. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Holt, C. L., Tagai, E. K., Santos, S. L. Z., Scheirer, M. A., Bowie, J., Haider, M.,…Wang, M. Q. (2016). Is online comparable to in-person training for community health advisors conducting a church-based intervention? Manuscript submitted for publication

Graham-Phillips, A.G., Holt, C.L., Mullins, C.D., Slade, J.L., Savoy, A., Carter, R.  (2016).  Health ministry and activities in African American faith-based organizations:  A qualitative examination of facilitators, barriers, and use of technology. Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved.

Steward, J., Holt, C.L., Pollio, D.E., Austin, E.L., Johnson, N., Gordon, A.J., & Kertesz, S.G. (2016).  Priorities in the Primary Care of Persons Experiencing Homelessness: Convergence and Divergence in the Views of Patients and Provider/Experts.  Patient Preference and Adherence,10, 1-6.

Nan, X., Madden, K., Richards, A., Holt, C.L., Wang, M., & Tracy, K. (2015).  Message framing, perceived susceptibility, and intentions to vaccinate one’s child against HPV among African American parents.  Health Communication, 8, 1-8, [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 26646190.  DOI:10.1080/10410236.2015.1005280.

Tajeu, G., Cherrington, A., Andreae, L., Prince, C., Holt, C.L., Halanych, J.  (2015).  "We'll get to you when we get to you":  Exploring Potential Contributions of Healthcare Staff Behaviors to Patient Perceptions of Discrimination and Satisfaction.  American Journal of Public Health, 105, 2076-2082.  DOI:  10.2105/AJPH.2015.302721.

Williams, B.R., Holt, C.L., Le, D., & Schulz, E.  (2015).  Characterizing Change in Religious and Spiritual Identity among a National Sample of African American Adults.  Journal of Religion, Spirituality, and Aging, 27 (4), 343-357.  DOI:  10.1080/15528030.2015.1073208.

Le, D., Holt, C.L., Hosack, D.P., Huang, J., & Clark, E.M.  (2015).  Religious participation is associated with increases in religious social support in a national longitudinal study of African Americans.  Journal of Religion and Health. Article first published online.  DOI: 10.1007/s10943-015-0143-1.

Le, D., Holt, C.L., Saunders, D.R., Wang, M.Q., Coriolan, A.R., Savoy, A., Slade, J., Muwwakkil, M., and Atkinson, N.  (2015).  Feasibility and acceptability of SMS text messaging in a prostate cancer educational intervention for African men.  Health Informatics Journal.  Article first published online.  DOI: 10.1177/1460458215598636.

Director of Student Engagement, Prometheus@UMD Project, Applied Environmental Health (MIAEH)
Other Affiliations: SPH
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2234V

Filbert had left the world of scientific research but has since come back. For more than ten years he was Director of Artistic Operations for the National Philharmonic (based at the Music Center at Strathmore in North Bethesda, MD), a $2 million-budget symphony orchestra and chorus. He was orchestra personnel manager, production manager, chorale manager, stage manager, guest artist manager, education coordinator, and music performance librarian. He has also done orchestra personnel and production work with the Takoma Ensemble (based in Takoma Park, MD) and the Concert Artists of Baltimore.

Filbert earned his A.B. in Chemistry and Physics at Harvard College, and his Ph.D. in the Harvard University Biophysics program, studying agonist and antagonist interactions with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ion channel, using electrophysiology methods (on whole cells and on detached patches), in the Department of Neurobiology at Harvard Medical School. While he was a graduate student he was Resident Tutor for Music and Biophysics at Lowell House at Harvard College, and managed many of Harvard's student orchestras. For four years he was executive producer for the Lowell House Opera, New England's oldest continually running opera company. He is a violinist and violist, and is learning choral singing with Dr. Ted Guerrant (UMD School of Music).

Filbert will be assisting with coordination of the Prometheus Project, and will be developing curricula associated with the Project for the College Park Scholars Program.

Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2367F
Phone: (301) 405-9797 |
Office Hours: 

Monday through Friday 8:30-12:00. Call or e-mail for an appointment.

Biography

A health educator, Dr. Horowitz formerly was a senior scientist, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Health (NIDCR), National Institutes of Health (NIH).  Dr. Horowitz has extensive work in dental caries prevention and early detection. She also has developed numerous surveys on the subject. Dr. Horowitz was instrumental in initiating the need to address health literacy in dentistry and was one of the authors of the first NIH Program Announcement addressing health literacy. She also organized the NIDCR’s workshop on oral health literacy and co-authored the findings. She served as the NIH lead for the Healthy People 2010 Oral Health Chapter and worked on Healthy People and Healthy People 2020. Dr. Horowitz was a primary architect of the Maryland State Oral Cancer Prevention and Early Detection coalition. She initiated both state and national research on what health care providers and the public know and do about oral cancer prevention and early detection. She served on the recent Institute of Medicine’s panel, Advancing Oral Health in America. She has published over 125 scientific papers and book chapters.

Education and Training

May 1992 - PhD. (health education), University of Maryland

June 1965 ‑ MA (education), University of Iowa

June 1962 ‑ BA (general science), University of Iowa

June 1961 ‑ RDH (dental hygiene), University of Iowa

Courses

Health Literacy

Honors and Awards

American Dental Association Honorary Member October 2014

Certificate of Achievement Recognition Delta Omega, UMD SPH April 2014
 University of Maryland, School of Public Health –Alumni of the Year 2012

University of California San Francisco--- John C. Greene Lecture 2010

US Public Health Service—Surgeon General David Satcher Keynote Lecture--2008 Scientific and Training

American Board of Dental Public Health-Honorary Diplomate--2007

New York Dental Foundation- Foundation of Excellence in Research Award 2006

NIH Plain Language Outstanding Award—2004

Hispanic Dental Association President’s Award, 2002

State of Maryland, Champions Against Oral Cancer Award, 2001

NIDCR/NIH Special Merit Award 2001

American Public Health Association, Oral Health Section, John W. Knutson Award for Distinguished Service—2000

DHHS Secretary’s Award for Distinguished Service---2000

American Association of Public Health Dentistry, Distinguished Service Award – 1999.

NIH Director’s Award--1999

Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors, Distinguished Service Award   - 1993

International Association for Dental Research, H. Trendley Dean Award - 1992

American Association of Public Health Dentistry, Special Merit Award – 1988

Publications: 

Horowitz AM, Kleinman DV, Goodman Hs, Welby J. A multi-level, multi-sector oral health literacy initiative to reduce oral health disparities and achieve health equity: Early lessons from the Maryland Model. Curr Oral Health Rep. 2016:DOI 10.1007/s40496-016-0092-0.
Weatherspoon DJ, Horowitz AM, Kleinman DV. Maryland physicians’ knowledge, opinions and practices related to dental caries etiology and prevention in children. Pediatr Dent 2016:38(1):61-67.
Horowitz AM, Canto MT, Goodman H. Child W. Perception and practices of preventing dental caries by Maryland Latinas: A qualitative study. J Dent & Oral Care Med. 2016;2:1-6.
Weatherspoon DJ, Horowitz AM, Kleinman DV, Wang MQ. The Use of recommended communication techniques by Maryland family physicians and pediatricians. PLOS ONE. April 9,2015.DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0119855.

Koo LW, Horowitz AM, Radice SR, Wang MQ, Kleinman DV. Nurse practitioners’ use of communication techniques: Results of a Maryland oral health literacy survey. PLoS ONE 2016 11(1): e0146545. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0146545

Horowitz AM, Robinson LA, Ng MW, Archarya A. 2014. After visit summaries: A tool whose time has come for use in dentistry. Discussion Paper, Institute of Medicine, Washington, DC. www.iom.edu/aftervisitsummaries 

Horowitz AM, Maybury C, Kleinman DV, Radice SR, Wang MQ, Child, W, Rudd RE. Health literacy environmental scans of community-based dental clinics in Maryland.  Am J Public Health. 2014;104:e85-e93.

Horowitz AM, Child W, Kleinman DV, Maybury C. Perspectives of Maryland Adults Regarding Caries prevention. J Am Public Health. 2015;105:e58-e64.

Matsuo G, Horowitz AM, Beck KH, Wang MQ, Kleinman DV. What Maryland Dentists Know and Do about preventing Dental Caries in Children. J of Theory and Practice of Dental Public Health. 2015;2:9-18.

Horowitz AM, Clovis JC, Kleinman DV, Wang MQ. Use of recommended communication techniques by Maryland dental hygienists.  2013; 4:181-1192.

Horowitz AM, Kleinman DV, Wang MQ. What Maryland Adults with Young Children Know and do about Preventing Dental Caries. AJPH 2013;103:e69-e76. 

Horowitz AM, Wang MQ, Kleinman DV. Opinions of Maryland Adults Regarding Communication Practices of Dentists and Staff. J Health Comm 2012;17: 1204-1214.

Horowitz AM. Review Analysis & Evaluation: Rubber Cup Dental Prophylaxis is not needed prior to the topical application of fluorides and rubber cup dental prophylaxis at recall is not effective in the prevention of gingivitis. J Evid Base Dent Pract 2012;12:77-78.

Parker EJ, Misan G, Chong A, Mills H, Roberts-Thomson K, Horowitz AM, Jamieson LM. An oral health literacy intervention for Indigenous adults in a rural setting in Australia. BMC Public Health. 2012;12:461.

Maybury CA, Horowitz AM, Goodman HS. Outcomes of oral cancer early detection and prevention statewide model in Maryland. Am J Public Health Dent. 2012;72:S34-S38.

Horowitz AM, Kleinman DV. Oral health literacy: A pathway to reducing oral health disparities in Maryland. Am J Public Health Dent.2012;72:S26-S30.

Clovis JC, Horowitz AM, Kleinman DV, Wang MQ, Massey M.  Maryland Dental Hygienists Knowledge, Opinions, and Practices Regarding Dental Caries Prevention and Early Detection. J Dent Hygiene.  2012;86; (No. 4);292-305.

Horowitz AM, Kleinman DV. Creating a Health Literacy Based Practice. J Calif Dent Assoc. 2012;40:331-340.

Braun B, Horowitz AM, Kleinman DV, Gold RS, Radice SD, Maybury CA. Health Literacy:  At the Intersection of Schools and Public Health. J Calif Dent Assn. CDAJ 2012;40:323-330.

Maybury CA, Horowitz AM, Yan AF, Green KM, Wang MQ. Maryland dentists’ knowledge of Oral cancer prevention and early detection. JCalif Dent Assn 2012;40:341-350.

Buerlein JK, Horowitz AM, Child WL. Perspectives of Maryland women regarding oral health during pregnancy and early childhood. Am J Public Health Dent. 2011:71:131-135.

Rozier, GR, Horowitz, AM, Podschun G. Use of communication techniques by dentists in the United States: Results of a national survey. J Am Dent Assoc. 2011;142:518-530.

Associate Professor, Behavioral and Community Health
Faculty Affiliate, Maternal and Child Health, Department of Family Science (2012- present); Faculty Affiliate, The Herschel S. Horowitz Center for Health Literacy (2012- present); Faculty Associate, Maryland Population Research Center (2011- present)
Other Affiliations: Center on Young Adult Health and Development, Horowitz Center for Health Literacy, UMD Prevention Research Center
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2372
Phone: (301) 405-2520 |
Office Hours: 

Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:30-4:30 or by appointment. To make an appointment email me at: dhoward1@umd.edu

Biography

My work has centered broadly on community-based empowerment efforts, principally among minority and poor populations.  For the past 20 years I have focused on adolescent risk and protective behaviors, particularly interpersonal and intimate partner violence.  I have expertise in qualitative methods and leadership experience with developing, implementing, analyzing and publishing qualitative research addressing various domains of community violence (i.e., interpersonal, dating, and sexual violence) and their psychosocial correlates. I was PI of both NICHD and University of Maryland School of Public Health funded research on healthy and harmful teen dating relationships and the role of socialization in shaping dating attitudes and behaviors. I had a Seed Grant from the University of Maryland Population Research Center to explore the use of social media in the formation, maintenance, conflict resolution and dissolution of adolescent dating relationships.  I am currently working on analysis of data examining of religious socialization and teen dating dynamics and adolescent minority males’ ideas of healthy and harmful dating relationships. 

My interests are also in global public health.  While on sabbatical during the 2008-9 academic year, I was the recipient of a Fulbright-Pai Fellowship to India where I spent 4.5 months as a Visiting Lecturer/Professor in the Department of Community Medicine, Manipal University, Karnataka, India.  Upon my return, I developed, and now annually lead, a study abroad to south India where students are exposed to the organization and practice of public health within an Indian context.  This winter session program is entitled:  East Meets West:  Contrasting Public Health Priorities, Pragmatics and Polemics in the U.S. & India.  Currently, I am co-investigator on a 5-year Multi-method, Multi-design study examining the impact of Galli Galli Sim Sim (the Indian version of Sesame Street) on preschool children’s literacy, numeracy, socioemotional development, health, nutrition and child safety.

Education and Training

1978: B.S., University of Massachusetts, Amherst - Major: Community Nutrition

1980: M.P.H., University of Hawaii School of Public Health - Major: International/Cross-Cultural Health

1994: DrPH, The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health - Major: Behavioral Sciences and Health Education

Area of Specialty:  Adolescent Risk and Protective Behaviors

1994 - 1996: Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, Center for Minority Health Research - University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland

Courses
Honors and Awards

Winner, Top Poster Award, Howard D, Mehrotra D, Borzekowski DLG.  A Qualitative Study Informing the Education Content of an Indian Preschool TV Program (Galli Galli Sim Sim).  International Communication Association Annual Meeting, Fukuoka, Japan. (2016)

Exceptional Teacher at the University of Maryland, The Academy of Excellence in Teaching and Learning (AETL) (2015)

Life After Scholars Mentor Award, College Park Scholars Global Public Health (2015)

Inductee, Gamma Zeta chapter of Delta Omega (Honorary society in Public Health) (2015)

Kappa Alpha Theta Fraternity’s Ten Outstanding Faculty Members Across the USA and Canada Award Recipient (2013)

Phillip Merrill Presidential Scholars Program Mentor Award, UMCP (2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2006)

Faculty Recognition Award from Global Public Health students “All of the Above” (6 categories of merit), College Park Scholars University of Maryland (2012)

Honorable Mention Poster Competition, Communication Category:  “Defining and deconstructing adolescent girls dating dynamics.”  University of Maryland School of Public Health Research Interaction Day Poster Competition, College Park, MD (2011) 

Jerry P. Wren Outstanding Service Award, UMCP SPH (2011)

Faculty Recognition from Global Public Health Program, UMCP College Park Scholars (2011)

Recipient, University-Wide Celebration of Scholarship and Research, UMCP (2011, 2008)

Expert Advisor, National Institute of Justice’s Teen Dating Violence project (2010-present)

Regional Reviewer, India Fulbright Program, Council for International Exchange of Scholars (2010-2013)

13th Annual President's Cup Student Mentor Invitee (2009-10)

Center for Teaching Excellence Fellowships- Teaching with New(er) Technologies Fellowship (2009)

Fulbright-Pai Fellowship to India Manipal University, Manipal, India (2008-9)

School of Public Health Doris Sands Teacher of the Year Award, UMCP (2007-8)

Lilly Fellow, Center for Teaching Excellence, University of Maryland, College Park (2002-3)

Collaborators

Irwin Royster, Dr. Nancy Aiken, Dr. Katrina Debnam, Dr. Brian Gilchrist, Dr. Sharon O’Brien

Publications: 

Fedina L, Murray K, Howard DE, Wang MQ.  (In press, 2016). Teen Dating Violence Victimization, Perpetration, and Sexual Health Outcomes among Urban, Low-income, Ethnic and Racial Minority Youth.  International Quarterly of Community Health Education.

Howard DE, Debnam K, Strausser A. (In press, 2016). “I’m a stalker and I’m proud of it: Adolescent Girls’ Perceptions of the Role Played by Social and Digital Media in Dating Relationship Dynamics”. Youth & Society.

Bhagat K., Howard, D. (In press, 2016) Children’s Conceptualizations of Health, Healthy Bodies, and Health Practices: An Analysis of Dialogue and Drawings.  Critical Public Health.

Aluko O, Beck K., Howard D.  (2015).  Medical students’ beliefs about screening for intimate partner violence: A qualitative study.  Journal of Health Promotion Practice 16, 4, 540-549.  DOI 10.1177/1524839915571183.

Howard DE, John C, Gilchrist B, Royster, I, Aiken, N.. (2015). Adolescent Minority Males Characterizations of Healthy Teen Dating Relationships.  Challenging One-Dimensional Stereotypes  Journal of Child & Adolescent Behavior, 3:6.  http://dx.doi.org/10.4172/2375-4494.1000256.

Howard DE, Debnam KJ, Cham H, Czinn A, Aiken N, Jordan J, Goldman R. (2015).  The (Mal) Adaptive Value of Mid-Adolescent Dating Relationship Labels.  Journal of Primary Prevention 36,187-203.DOI 10.1007/s10935-015-0387-2

Bellows D., Howard D, Boekeloo B., Randolph S.  (2015).  Investigating community concerns regarding HIV Prevention Organization’s expertise in serving HIV-vulnerable populations. Progress in Community Health Partnerships.

Debnam K, Howard DE, Garza M. (2014).  "If You Don't Have Honesty in a Relationship, Then There Is No Relationship": African American Girls' Characterization of Healthy Dating Relationships, A Qualitative Study.  The Journal of Primary Prevention. Aug 29. [Epub ahead of print]

Debnam KJ, Howard DE, Garza MA, Green KM.  (2014). African American Girls’ Ideal Dating Relationship Now and In the Future.  Youth & Society. published online 22 May 2014. DOI: 10.1177/0044118X14535417

Howard DE, Debnam K, Wang MQ.  (2013). 10 Year Trends in Physical Dating Violence Victimization among U.S. Adolescent Females. Journal of School Health 83,6, 389-399.

Murray K, Haynie D, Howard D, Cheng T, Simons-Morton, B.  (2013). Perceptions of parenting practices and aggression in an urban African American sample: An examination of directional relationships. Family Relations. 62,648.DOI:10.1111/fare.12025

Howard DE, Debnam K, Wang MQ, Gilchrist B.  (2012). 10 Year Trends Physical Dating Violence Victimization among U.S. Adolescent Males. International Quarterly of Community Health Education 32, 4, 283-305.

Howard, D.E., Raj, C.V., & Desmond, S.  (2010). Borrowing from the East to Strengthen the West:  Merging Public Health Case Studies of Community-Based Service Learning Practices from India and the U.S.   Journal of Community Practice, Special Edition 18 , 2, 336-360.

Griffin, M., Howard, D.E., & Boekeloo, B.  (2010 online; Jan 2011 paper).  Drinking Motivation, Sexual Risk Behavior and Sexual Dating Violence among Undergraduate Students.  Journal of Interpersonal Violence.

Murray, K., Haynie, D., Howard, D., & Cheng, T.  (2010).  Perceptions of parenting practices as predictors of aggression in a low-income, urban predominately African American middle school sample.  Journal of School Violence 9, 2, 174-193.

Carpenter, C., & Howard, D.  (2009).  Development and initial psychometric testing of a survey instrument to measure adolescents’ drug use resistance self-efficacy.  American Journal of Health Behavior 33, 147-157. 

Yan, F., Beck, K., Howard, D., & Shattuck, T.  (2008). A Structural Model of Alcohol Use Pathways among Latino Youth.  American Journal Health Behavior, 32, 209-219. 

Howard, D.E., Wang, M.Q., & Yan, F.  (2008).  Prevalence and psychosocial correlates of forced sexual intercourse among U.S. high school adolescents.  Adolescence, 42, 629-643.

Howard, D.E., Wang, M.Q., & Yan, F.  (2008).  Psychosocial factors associated with reports of physical dating violence among U.S. adolescent males. Adolescence 43, 449-460.

Academic Advisor, Office of the Dean
Building: School of Public Health
Phone: (301) 405-1010 |
Joan S. Hult
Professor Emerita, Kinesiology
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health
Phone: (301) 405-2450 |
Biography

Joan S. Hult (Ph.D. University of Southern California) is a Professor Emerita in the Department of Kinesiology. Her work focuses on sport history, and philosophy of sport. Dr. Hult is one of the foremost sport historians on American women in athletics. She has written and spoken extensively on all aspects of women in sport including governance, the Olympics, basketball, and Title IX issues. She was co-editor of the NAGWS sponsored book, A Century of Women's Basketball: From Frailty to Final Four.

Education and Training

B.S., Indiana University-Bloomington, 1954
M.Ed., University of North Carolina-Greensboro, 1958
Ph.D., University of Southern California-Los Angeles, 1967

Laura Hungerford
Professor (Joint Appointment), Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Professor, Dept. of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine
Campus: UMB | Building: Howard Hall | Room: 1ST FL
Phone: (410)706-2673 |
Website: 
University of Maryland School of Medicine profile
Prince Hunter
Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2387
Phone: (301) 405-2549 |
Anwar Huq
Research Professor (Maryland Pathogen Research Institute), Applied Environmental Health (MIAEH)
Affiliate in MIAEH
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 3132 Bioscience Research Building
Phone: 301-405-7428 |
Biography

Dr. Anwar Huq is a Professor in the Maryland Pathogen Institute at the University of Maryland. He came to Maryland as a faculty in the Department of Microbiology in 1989. He has studied the ecology of Vibrio cholerae and plankton, more specifically copepods, its host in the environment that lead to major findings in the survival, multiplication and transmission of this pathogen in the environment.

Dr. Huq's research interest includes understanding of pathogens, focusing on waterborne pathogens with the ultimate goal of disease prevention and or intervention. Bacterial pathogens that are occurring naturally in the environment cannot be eradicated. Moreover, with global climate change, significant impact is expected to take place on many of these pathogens. His work on the ecology, survival, transmission and detection of V. cholerae with ultimate goal for prediction and prevention of the disease cholera involving conventional microbiological methods, immunological methods, and molecular biology, along with oceanography, limnological methods and satellite remote sensing technology. Dr. Huq has also worked extensively on safe drinking water for people in developing countries.

Education and Training

Ph.D., Microbiology, University of Maryland- College Park 

Professor, Kinesiology
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2134D
Phone: (301) 405-2486 |
CV / Resume
File CV 2-4-2013.docx
Biography

Research Summary:
My research interests consist of the effects of aging, diet and exercise training on risk factors for age-related diseases and disability.    

Assistant Professor, Family Science
Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1142E
Phone: 301.405. 8501 |
CV / Resume
PDF icon CV_Hurtado.pdf
Education and Training

Ph.D. in Human Resource Development from the University of Minnesota

Sunjae Hwang
Post-Doctoral Associate, Kinesiology
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2241
Phone: (301) 405-2574 |
CV / Resume
PDF icon CV_SJ Hwang_1010.pdf
Biography

My research focuses on multisensory integration and characterizing dynamic human postural control by multiple input stimuli. This research can provide the most effective methods to discern the integration of sensory information by the central nervous system.

Professor, Kinesiology
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2142
Phone: (301) 405-2505 |
Biography

Research Summary:
Dr. Iso-Ahola's research interests and activities are two-fold: (1) Social psychological factors in athletic performance (e.g. mental training), and (2) social psychology of exercise and health (e.g. motivation for exercise). He has published four books and over 70 research articles in refereed journals and chapters in edited books. He has received 3 prestigious research awards and has been invited to serve as distinguished visiting professor in Australia, Canada, Finland, Holland, and New Zealand. 

Study Coordinator, Center for Health Equity
Campus: UMD | Building: Building #255 | Room: 2356
Phone: 301-405-1464 |

Devlon N. Jackson is a Study Coordinator at the Maryland Center for Health Equity at the University of Maryland (M-CHE). Dr. Jackson earned her PhD in Communications and Culture from Howard University and her Masters of Public Health degree from Florida International University. She also earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in Organizational Communications from the University of Central Florida. Dr. Jackson’s research interests include assessing communication facilitators and barriers (specifically, patient-provider communication, social media, and health information technology) in the medical shared decision making process within and outside of the clinical care setting and determining existing communication inequalities. Her interests in communication inequalities and health disparities stems from over 10 years of public health research and practice experience that has served diverse populations, including underserved racial/ethnic populations within the areas of HIV/AIDS prevention and care, and cancer control. Prior to joining the M-CHE, Dr. Jackson was a Cancer Research Training Award Postdoctoral Fellow and Health Communication Intern in the Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch (HCIRB) within the Behavioral Research Program (BRP) of Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences (DCCPS) at the National Institutes of Health’s National Cancer Institute.

Faculty Research Assistant, Center for Health Equity
Building: School of Public Health

Professor Emeritus , Kinesiology
Campus: Off Campus | Building: Temple University, PA

CV / Resume
PDF icon Jeka-CV-2012.pdf
Biography

Research Summary:
Dr. Jeka studies how the brain combines sensory information about the environment and one's own body movement to better understand patient populations with neurological disease and injury that lead to balance problems. 

Education and Training

B.A., Tufts University, 1979; M.A., 1988
Ph.D., Florida Atlantic University, 1992

Shannon Jette
Associate Professor, Kinesiology
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2363 SPH Bldg.
Phone: (301) 405-2497 |
Laboratory Website: 
The THINC Lab - Technologies of Health IN Context
Biography

Research Summary:
Dr. Jette's research focuses on social, cultural, and historical aspects of knowledge production in the disciplines of kinesiology, medicine, and public health. She is particularly interested in studying exercise and fitness practices as technologies of health that have the potential to shape how we understand and experience our bodies. She uses a range of qualitative research methodologies (including media and discourse analysis, in-depth interviews, focus groups, ethnographic techniques) to examine: the production of knowledge about health and physical activity; how this knowledge has been (and is) put to use in the operation of power in differing socio-historical contexts; and how individuals negotiate various health-related messages. Her projects include: 

  • Women from diverse social and ethnic backgrounds’ differential perception of dominant policy and popular media messages pertaining to the relationship between motherhood, obesity, and femininity
  • A focus on contrasting (Western and traditional Chinese) approaches to prenatal exercise and gestational weight gain
  • The value of alternative forms of physical activity for pregnant women as a means of learning how to experience and understand their bodies in different ways than traditional methods
  • Issues related to the stigmatization of obese women undergoing fertility treatment

Overall, Dr. Jette's research agenda is linked by a desire to better understand the complex intersection of race, gender, sexuality and social class in shaping women’s health, with the goal of informing social policy and programming that may otherwise be insensitive to social location and cultural nuance. For more information see the Physical Cultural Studies website.   

Education and Training
PhD (2009), University of British Columbia (Kinesiology)
 
MA (2004), University of British Columbia (Kinesiology)
 
BSc (1998), Simon Fraser University (Kinesiology) 
Courses

Kinesiology 400: Foundations of Public Health in Kinesiology

This course provides students with a broad introduction to the core principles and goals of public health from a kinesiological perspective. Topics to be addressed include: history of public health and physical activity; basic principles of the epidemiology of physical activity; correlates and determinants of physical activity and health across the socioecological model; public health policy development aimed at encouraging regular physical activity; social justice and physical activity; physical activity interventions for diverse populations; the impact of social, political and economic contexts on health, as well as the creation of health disparities. 

Kinesiology 600: Kinesiology in Public Health

This course provides students with a broad introduction to the core principles and goals of public health from a kinesiological perspective. In addition to gaining a deeper understanding of both kinesiology and public health as fields of inquiry (with a particular focus on the competing ontological, epistemological, methodological, and axiological dimensions within and between each), students will explore the integrative relationships and possibilities within kinesiology as well as to domains of inquiry within public health. Central to the course will be an exploration of the challenges faced and opportunities presented as each attempts to forge an interdisciplinary approach to societal health issues. 

Kinesiology 615: The Body, Culture and Physical Activity

The goal of the course is to critically examine the notion of the ‘natural’ body, along with the various assumptions that this view of the body brings with it. More specifically, we will explore some of the questions that are at the forefront of the field of Body Studies: What can (active) bodies do? What might (active) bodies become? What practices enable and coordinate the doing of particular kinds of (active) bodies? And what does this make possible in terms of our approach to questions about life, humanness, culture, power, technology and subjectivity? (see Blackman, 2008, p. 1). Thus, while we maintain an interest in the various ways through which the active body is located within, and thereby experiences, the operations of social power, we will also focus on new ways of thinking through various dualisms such as structure and agency, mind and body, inside and outside. In particular, we will explore how the concept of ‘embodiment’ might be applied to further our understanding of the various dimensions of physical culture; a diverse cultural sphere including, but not restricted to: sport, health, movement, exercise, dance, and daily living related activities.
 

Kinesiology 789N: Physical Cultural Studies of Technoscience

Technology and science have an ever-intensifying role in our daily lives, including as they relate to our physical activity, leisure and exercise practices (think heart rate monitors and Fitbits, as well as scientifically defined norms around healthy body weight, to name but a few examples). With this centrality of techoscience come questions about the political, social, cultural, and economic implications. The field of Science and Technology Studies (STS) provides the tools for critically examining science and technology, from the role of expertise and ‘science’ as a social institution to emergent questions about technological agency. This course is an exploratory mapping of the terrain of the growing (and complex) field of STS from the origins of the field (e.g., Kuhn’s ‘Structure of Scientific Revolutions’ and the ‘strong programme’) to its more contemporary ‘ontological’ turn, with an additional focus on digital technologies, surveillance assemblages, and posthumanism. 

 

Honors and Awards

2010-2011: Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Postdoctoral Fellowship Award

2005-2008: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Canada Graduate Fellowship (Doctoral) Award

Collaborators

I am a co-investigator on a grant funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (2014-2017). The research team includes Deborah McPhail (PI, University of Manitoba), Genevieve Rail (Co-I, Concordia University) and Carla Rice (Co-I, Guelph University). The three year project will entail a qualitative examination of obesity stigma in reproductive care (with a specific focus on fertility care) from the perspectives of patients, health practitioners, and policy makers. It will also include a discourse analysis of clinical and government policy concerning the provision of infertility treatment to women classified as obese.

Publications: 

Selected peer reviewed journal articles (* denotes graduate student; ** denotes undergraduate student)

*Esmonde, K., & Jette, S. (in press). Fatness, fitness, and feminism in the built environment: Bringing together Physical Cultural Studies and Sociomaterialisms, to study the ‘obesogenic environment. Sociology of Sport Journal.

Jette, S., *Maier, J., *Esmonde, K., & **Davis, C. (2017). Promoting prenatal exercise from a sociocultural and life-course perspective: An “embodied” conceptual framework, Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 88(3), 269-281. 

*Clevenger, S., & Jette, S. (2017). From ‘cultivators of the soil’ to ‘citizen-soldiers’: Physical activity and the nation at Maryland Agricultural College. Sport, Education and Society, 22(8), 958-970.

Jette, S., *Bhagat, K., & Andrews, D.L. (2016). Governing the child-citizen: ‘Let's Move!’ as national biopedagogy. Sport, Education and Society, 21(8), 1109-1126.

*Maier, J., & Jette, S. (2016). Promoting nature-based activity for people with mental illness through the US, "Exercise is Medicine" initiative. American Journal of Public Health, 106(5), 796-9. 

Jette, S., & *Roberts, E. (2016). "We usually just start dancing our Indian dances”: Urban American Indian (AI) female youths’ negotiation of identity, health and the body. Sociology of Health and Illness, 38(3), 396-410. DOI: 10.1111/1467-9566.12349

*Roberts, E., & Jette, S. (2016). Implementing participatory research with an urban American Indian community: Lessons learned. Health Education Journal, 75(2), 158-69. DOI: 10.1177/0017896915570395

*Cork, S., Jaeger, P., Jette, S., & **Ebrahimoff, S. (2016). The politics of (dis)information: Crippled America, the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and the 2016 U.S. Presidential Campaign. International Journal on Information, Diversity and Inclusion, 1, 1-15. 

Rail, G., & Jette, S. (Invited Guest Eds.) (2015). Introduction to Special Issue: “Body culture, biopedagogies and public health.” Cultural Studies/Critical Methodologies, 15(5), 327-36.

Jette, S., Vertinsky, P., & *Ng, C. (2014). Biomedicine and balance: Chinese-Canadian women’s negotiate pregnancy-related lifestyle directives and risk. Health, Risk & Society, 16(6), 494-511. 

Jette, S., & Rail, G. (2014). Resisting, reproducing, resigned? Low income pregnant women’s constructions and experiences of a healthy pregnancy and proper weight gain. Nursing Inquiry, 21(3), 202-11. DOI: 10.1111/nin.12052

Dumas, A., Robitaille, J., & Jette, S. (2014). Young women, health and poverty: Lifestyle as a choice of necessity. Social Theory and Health, 12, 138-58. DOI:10.1057/sth.2013.25

Norman, M.E., Rail, G., & Jette, S. (2014). Moving subjects, feeling bodies: Emotion and the materialization of fat feminine subjectivities in Village on a Diet. Fat Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Body Weight and Society, 3(1), 17-31.

Jette, S., & Rail, G. (2013). Ills from the womb? A critical examination of Evidence-Based Medicine and pregnancy weight gain advice. Health: An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine, 17(4), 407-21.

Jette, S. (2011). Exercising caution: The production of medical knowledge about physical exertion during pregnancy. Canadian Bulletin of Medical History/ Bulletin canadien d'histoire de la medicine, 28(2), 383-401.

Jette, S., & Vertinsky, P. (2011). ‘Exercise is medicine’: Understanding the exercise beliefs and practices of older Chinese women immigrants in British Columbia, Canada. Journal of Aging Studies, 25(3), 272-84. 

Selected book chapters (* denotes graduate student)

Jette, S. (2017). Pregnant bodies. In D. Andrews, M. Silk, & H. Thorpe (Eds.), Routledge Handbook of Physical Cultural Studies (pp. 313-320). New York: Routledge. 

Jette, S. (in press). Sport for all, or fit for two? Governing the (in)active pregnancy”. In R. Dionigi and M. Gard (Eds.), Critical perspectives on sport and physical activity across the lifespan. Palgrave Macmillan, UK.

*Bhagat, K., & Jette, S. (2016). An intervention on public health interventions – Questioning the dominant obesity discourse. In E. Cameron (Ed.), The fat pedagogy reader: Challenging weight-based oppression in education. New York: Peter Lang Publishing

Jette, S., & Vertinsky, P. (2015). The contingencies of exercise science in a globalizing world: Ageing Chinese Canadian and their play and pleasure in exercise. In E. Tulle & C. Phoenix (Eds.). Physical activity in sport and later life. London: Palgrave Macmillan

Norman, M. E., Rail, G. & Jette, S. (accepted in 2012 & in press). Screening the un-scene: De-constructing the (bio)politics of story telling in a Reality Makeover weight loss series. In D. McPhail, J. Ellison & W. Mitchinson (Eds.) Obesity in Canada: Historical and critical perspectives. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

 

Research Assistant Professor, Applied Environmental Health (MIAEH)
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2234L
Phone: 301-405-5138 |
Biography

Dr. Jiang has experience in GIS, spatial statistics, spatial sampling design, data analysis, data mining, air pollution exposure assessment, climate change, GPS application in environment health, human behavior classification, large data sets, spatial database and software design and implementation. His current research focus is on evaluating the effects of climate change on public health and environmental justice, and the relation between adverse health effects (eg. cancer risk) and social/economic status and environmental health.

 

Jeffrey Johnson
Professor (Joint Appointment), Behavioral and Community Health
Professor, Family & Community Health, University of Maryland School of Nursing
Campus: UMB | Building: | Room: 480B
Phone: (410)706-0799 |
Website: 
University of Maryland School of Medicine profile
Associate Professor, Family Science
Affiliate faculty, History Department
Other Affiliations: Public Health Science
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health Building | Room: 1142W School of Public Health, Dept. of Family Science
Phone: 301.405.8940 |
Office Hours: 

Mondays 1-5p.m. Contact via email to set up a time.

CV / Resume
File mmjCV_316.docx
Biography

Marian Moser Jones is a social historian and ethicist of public health who explores the institutionalization of benevolence in the United States. Her research examines how and why the American institutional sector has developed to provide for the health and survival needs of families, children, and other vulnerable populations in crisis situations, as well as how it has exercised the power to decide what is best for peoples’ health and well-being. She defines benevolence broadly as encompassing activities that might be labeled “humanitarian,” such as aid to people affected by a disaster; activities that might be considered “charitable” or “philanthropic,” such as organizing a diaper drive for low-income parents or founding a homeless shelter; and activities that might be viewed as merely necessary to promote and protect health, such as establishing a poison control center. Such a broad definition is applied because dominant beliefs about public and private responsibility for individual and family health and welfare have shifted considerably in the U.S. during the past two centuries.

Jones' first peer-reviewed book, The American Red Cross, from Clara Barton to the New Deal, was published by Johns Hopkins University Press in December 2012. Her lead-authored article, “Poison Politics: A Contentious History of Consumer Protection against Dangerous Household Chemicals in the United States,” received the 2012-2013 Article of the Year award from the American Journal of Public Health. In 2005, Jones published a commissioned monograph for the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene entitled Protecting Public Health in New York City: 200 Years of Leadership.

Jones teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on family health, the history of public health, and on the history and practice of the human services. She received her Ph.D. and M.P.H. degrees in Sociomedical Sciences from Columbia University, and her A.B. from Harvard College. She studied the history and sociology of science as a 2010-2011 De Witt Stetten postdoctoral fellow at the National Institutes of Health. She has previously taught at Virginia Commonwealth University and worked as a health and science journalist in New York City and Boston.

Education and Training

Ph.D., Sociomedical Sciences/History, Ethics & Policy, Columbia University, 2008.

M.P.H., Sociomedical Sciences, Columbia University, 2005.

A.B., Visual and Environmental Studies, Harvard College, 1992.

Courses
  • FMSC 383 - Delivery of Human Services to Families
  • PHSC 401 - History of Public Health
  • FMSC 410 - Maternal, Child and Family Health
  • FMSC 730 - Key topics in MCH
  • HIST 619G - Histories of Humanitarianism and Human Rights 
Honors and Awards

2015 Doris Sands Excellence in Teaching Award, UMD School of Public Health.

2013​ Faculty Mentor Award, Phillip Merrill Presidential Scholars Program, UMD.

​2012-13 Article of the Year Award, American Journal of Public Health, American Public Health Association, for “Poison Politics: A Contested History of Consumer Protection against Dangerous Household Chemicals in the United States.”

2010-2011 DeWitt Stetten Fellow, National Institutes of Health History Office.

2007-2008 Dolores J. Quinn Fellow, Columbia University Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

2007 New York Academy of Medicine Student Essay Prize in the History of Medicine and Public Health, awarded for paper, “The Contentious History of Homelessness and Mental Illness in New York City: An Analysis of Interviews.”

Publications: 

Books

Jones, M.M. (Dec. 2012). The American Red Cross from Clara Barton to the New Deal, Baltimore, Johns Hopkins University Press.  
 
Book Chapters

Jones, M.M. (2015). Angel of the Battlefield, Clara Barton. In James I. Robertson and William C. Davis, eds., Virginia Essential Civil War Curriculum. Center for Civil War Studies at Virginia Tech.  Blacksburg, VA. http://www.essential.civilwar.vt.edu/. 

Jones M.M. (2014). The Red Cross. In Showalter, D. (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies Military History. New York, Oxford University Press.

Jones, M.M. and Bayer, R. (2008). Paternalism and Its Discontents: Motorcycle Helmet Laws, Libertarian Values, and Public Health. In Colgrove, J., Markowitz, G., and Rosner, D., The Contested Boundaries of American Public Health (pp. 110-126), Piscataway, NJ: Rutgers University Press.

Fairchild, A. and Jones, M.M. (2007). Ethics and the Conduct of Public Health Surveillance. In M’ M’ikanatha, Nkuchia M., Lynfield, Ruth, and Van Beneden, Chris & de Valk, Henriette, (Eds.), Infectious Disease Surveillance (pp. 445-449), London, Blackwell.

Articles in Refereed Journals

Jones, M.M. (2016, in press). Does Race Matter in Addressing Homelessness? A Review of Literature. World Medical & Health Policy issue TBD.

Jones, M.M. (2015). Creating a Science of Homelessness during the Reagan Era. Milbank Quarterly, 93:1; 139-178

Jones, M. M. (2014). Tempest in the Forbidden City: Racism, Violence, and Vulnerability in the 1926 Miami Hurricane. Journal of Policy History, 26: 3: 384-405.

Jones, M.M. and Benrubi, I.D. (2013). Poison Politics: A Contested History of Consumer Protection against Dangerous Household Chemicals in the United States. American Journal of Public Health, 103:801-12.
 
Jones, M.M. (2011). Race, Class and Gender Disparities in Clara Barton’s Late Nineteenth-Century Disaster Relief. Environment and History, 17: 107-131.
 
Jones, M.M. (2010). The American Red Cross and Local Response to the 1918 Influenza: A Four-City Case Study. Public Health Reports, Supplement 3: 125:92-104.
 
Jones, M.M., and Bayer, R. (2007). Paternalism and Its Discontents: Motorcycle Helmet Laws, Libertarian Values, and Public Health. American Journal of Public Health, 97: 208-217.
 
Fairchild, A., Colgrove, J., Jones, M.M. (2006). The Challenge of Mandatory Evacuation: Providing for and Deciding For. Health Affairs, 25: 958-967.
 
Refereed Conference Proceedings

Jones, M.M. (2016, in press) « L’Infirmière américaine pendant la Grande Guerre: qui était-elle? ». In Proceedings of « Humanitaire & Médicine 3 : La Croix-Rouge et la médecine face à la Première guerre mondiale et à ses suites immédiates : 1914-1920. Conference : Genève Humanitaire Historical Research Center and the Institute of the History of Medicine and Health at the University of Geneva Medical School.

Jones, M.M. (2016, in press) « Transplantation Transatlantique: La vie de Clara Barton et son influence sur la mission du mouvement de la Croix Rouge, » In Proceedings of « Humanitaire & Médicine 2 : La Croix Rouge à l’épreuve du feu 1870 – 1914 » Conference : Genève Humanitaire Historical Research Center and the Institute of the History of Medicine and Health at the University of Geneva Medical School.

Conference Proceedings
 
Jones, M.M. (Fall 2012). Rising to the Surface: Disasters and Racial Health Disparities in American History, Washington & Lee Journal of Civil Rights and Social Justice, 19: 19-30.
 
Monographs, Reports, and Extension Publications
 
Fairchild A., Colgrove J., Jones M.M., Redlener, I. (2006). Ethical and Legal Challenges Posed by Mandatory Hurricane Evacuation: Duties and Limits. New York, National Center for Disaster Preparedness-Children’s Health Fund.

Jones, M.M. (2005). Protecting Public Health in New York City: 200 Years of Leadership, New York, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
 
Book Reviews

Jones, M.M. (2016, in press). Review of book Nurses and Disasters: Global, Historical Case Studies, Arlene W. Keeling and Barbara Mann Wall, eds., Springer, 2015. Bulletin of the History of Medicine, forthcoming issue.

Jones, M.M. (2014). Review of Gordian Knot: Apartheid and the Unmaking of the Liberal World Order, Ryan Irwin, Oxford, 2012. History: Reviews of New Books: 42:3: 105-06.
 
Jones, M.M., (2009). Review of There is No Such Thing as a Natural Disaster: Race, Class, and Hurricane Katrina, Chester Hartman, and Gregory D. Squires, Eds., Routledge, 2006. Global Public Health, 4: 3: 318 – 320.
 
Jones, M.M. (2008). Review of exhibit PLAGUE in GOTHAM! Cholera in Nineteenth-Century New York. Bulletin of the History of Medicine, 82: 4: 918-919.

Selected Blogs and Articles in General Audience Publications

Jones, M.M. (2014).When the Crisis Fades, Remember the Nurses, Bates Center Blog, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Nov. 5.  The Nixon Flag in My Office. The Chronicle of Higher Education, Aug. 7. The World War I Centennial: Why Should Americans Care?, Johns Hopkins University Press Blog, July 28.

Jones, M.M. (2013). Clara Barton et Le Mouvement Humanitaire. Grotius International: Géopolitiques de l’humanitaire (France), Nov. 29. Will Same-Sex-Marriage Rulings Lead to an LGBT Brain Drain in Some States? The Chronicle of Higher Education, June 27. Haggling over Hurricane Sandy Relief: The Unraveling of a Rational Disaster Relief Policy. The Hill, Jan. 29. Finding Clara Barton, Johns Hopkins University Press Blog, January 16.

Audio and Video

"Being Clara Barton," WYPR NPR interview, Sept. 24, 2013.

"Clara Barton: Humanitarian Entrepreneur" - videorecording of public talk at Clara Barton National Historic Site, April 12, 2014.

"Poison Politics"  Video Blog, 2013.

Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health

Biography

Former Professor and Chair, Department of Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics (Microbiology), University of Maryland; Adjunct Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, UMB; and Former Director, Infectious Diseases Program, Naval Medical Research and Development Command, National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, MD. More than 120 refereed publications and 15 books and chapters. Member of Sigma Xi; Elected Fellow, American Academy of Microbiology; Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science. Extensive contract and grant work with FDA, Naval Medical Research and Development Command; Agency for International Development; Agricultural Experiment Station; USDA; Maryland Department of the Environment.

Education and Training

Ph.D., Microbiology, St. John's University M.S., Microbiology, St. John's University B.S.A., Bacteriology and Chemistry, University of Florida- Gainesville

Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health
Phone: 703-347-8545 |
Office Hours: 

Dr. Abdel-Razak M. Kadry is a senior advisor for Scientific Organizational Development and International Activities at the National Center for Environmental Assessment (NCEA) in the Office of Research and Development (ORD) the United States Environmental protection Agency. His experience in toxicology and risk assessment spans over thirty years and includes academic research, drug safety and efficacy, food safety and environmental risk assessment. For Five years Dr. Kadry worked as the Director of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) at U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.  Abdel joined EPA after serving as the Chief of the Technical Analysis and Evaluation Branch, Risk Assessment Division, Office of Public Health Sciences, Food Safety and Inspection Service, at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). In addition to his work at USDA, Abdel spent 12 years as a faculty at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, and has published a large volume of peer reviewed journal articles and book chapters. He trained large number of graduate students, postdoctoral fellow and other professionals in the United States and several countries on the principles and applications of toxicological research and risk assessments.  Abdel received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from Cairo University, Egypt and MS and Ph.D. degrees in toxicology from Zagazig University, Egypt. He is certified by both the American Board of Toxicology, and the National Board of Veterinary Medicine. Abdel is an active member of the Society of Toxicology, Society of Risk Analysis and other professional organizations. He is the past president of the Association of Government Toxicologists.

Education and Training

PhD: Toxicology, Zagazig University

M.V.Sc: Toxicology, Zagazig University

B.V.Sc: Veterinary Sciences, Cairo University

Courses

MIEH 740   Risk Assessment

Communications Coordinator, Office of the Dean
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2242W
Phone: (301) 314-2006 |
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health
Phone: (301) 405-2467 |
Professor of the Practice, Family Science
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1142K,School of Public Heath
Phone: 301.405.7573 |
Office Hours: 

Contact via email to set up a time unless otherwise listed in Course Syllabus.

Education and Training

M.D., Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY M.P.H., Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

Courses

FMSC 710 - Foundations of Maternal and Child Health HONR 228M - Public Health Politics, Honors Program

Honors and Awards
  • Senior program director and administrator for the achievement of national health promotion and disease prevention objectives, conduct of applied medical research and discovery, implementation of effective community-based programs, and advancement of professional education.
  • Senior advisor on public health, health policy, and child and family health matters to the White House, Cabinet Secretaries, Surgeon Generals, and Health and Human Services officials spanning eight administrations.
  • Investigator for the development of new knowledge and science-based public policy.
  • Health care practitioner in urban and inner-city communities.
  • Counselor and advocate for the improvement of child, family, and community health; the attainment of science-based and performance-based systems results; the advancement of public and private enterprise; the realization of cultural and discipline diversity; and the promotion of team spirit and human potential.
  • Developed the principles for and directed operations of the President’s Safe and Bright Futures for Children Initiative, the President’s HealthierUS – Healthier Children and Youths, the President’s Task Force Children’s Environmental Health and Safety and the President’s State Children’s Health Insurance Program.
  • Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences
  • Clinical Instructor, Department of Child Health & Development Children’s Hospital National Medical Center, George Washington University, Washington, DC
  • Author of 19 articles in referred journals and a book chapter as well as 13 major research and technical reports.
Publications: 

Kessel, S. S., Soto-Torres, L. E., Kogan, M. D., Koontz, A. M., Fingerhut, L. A., & Ellison, B. F. (1994). America's children: Disparities among key maternal and child health measures. In H. M. Wallace, R. P. Nelson, & P. J. Sweeney (Ed.), Maternal and Child Health (4th ed.).Oakland, CA: Third Party Publishing Company.

Kiely, M., Drum, A. M., & Kessel, W. (1998). Early discharge: Risks, benefits, and who decides. Clinics in Perinatology, 25(3), 539-553.

Braveman, P., Kessel, W., Egerter, S., & Richmond, J. B. (1997). Early discharge and evidence based practice: Good science and good judgment. Journal of the American Medical Association, 278(4), 334-336.

Fishman, M., Kessel, W., Brannon, E., Papai, J, Heppel, D, & Nora, A. H. (1997). Collaborative office rounds: Continuing education in the psychosocial/developmental aspects of child health. Pediatrics, 99(4), http://www.pediatrics.org/cgi/content/full/99/4/e5.

Yu, S. M., Keppel, K. G., Singh, G. K., & Kessel, W. (1996). Preconceptional and prenatal multivitamin-mineral supplement use in the 1988 National Maternal and Infant Health Survey. American Journal of Public Health, 86(2), 240-242.

Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Communication
Other Affiliations: UMD - Not within SPH
Campus: UMD | Building: 2104 Skinner Building
Phone: (301) 405-0864 |
Biography

Sahar Khamis is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Maryland, College Park. She is an expert on Arab and Muslim media and the former Head of the Mass Communication and Information Science Department in Qatar University. Dr. Khamis holds a Ph.D. in Mass Media and Cultural Studies from the University of Manchester in England. She is the co-author of the book: “Islam Dot Com: Contemporary Islamic Discourses in Cyberspace”, Palgrave Macmillan, New York, 2009. Click here for Dr. Khamis’ CV.
 

Faculty Assistant, Behavioral and Community Health
Manager, Tobacco Center of Regulatory Science (TCORS)
Other Affiliations: Tobacco Center of Regulatory Science
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health

Laboratory Website: 
Center for Health Behavior Research
Website: 
Tobacco Center of Regulatory Science
Biography

Ms. Kidanu supports the administrative activities of the University of Maryland/Battelle TCORS and serves as research coordinator on the project to examine consumer acceptability of new and manipulated tobacco products through traditional subjective measurements and objective measurements of neurocognitive function (TCORS Research Project 2). She has previous experience planning, implementing and evaluating programs and activities directed at tobacco use prevention and control at the local health department level. 

Education and Training

M.P.H. in Community Health Education from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville

B.A. in Biology from the St. Catherine University

Honors and Awards

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Julius B. Richmond Visiting Lectureship Award, 2014

The Dr. June Gorski Scholarship for Public Health, 2011

Research Assistant Professor, Kinesiology
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2339
Phone: (301) 405-2488 |
CV / Resume
PDF icon kiemel_cv_2012-12-06.pdf
Biography

My research focuses on the neural control of movement. The behaviors I study include walking and the postural control of standing in humans and swimming in lampreys. My emphasis is on system-level models that illuminate key aspects of neural control and the use of empirical data to develop and test such models.

Professor, Family Science
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1142P,School of Public Health
Phone: 301.405.3500 |
Office Hours: 

Contact via email to set up a time unless otherwise listed in Course Syllabus.

CV / Resume
PDF icon Jinhee Kim CV 2017.pdf
Education and Training

Ph.D., Family Resource Management, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 2000

Courses
  • FMSC 341 - Personal and Family Finance
  • FMSC 498D - Credit Cards and College Students
  • FMSC 498B - Death and Loss in Family Life (co-instructor)
Honors and Awards
  • Director of Research, National Institute for Personal Finance Employee Education, Virginia Tech.
  • Co-editor, Personal Finances and Worker Productivity, Virginia Tech.
  • Vice President, 2007-present. Persona Finance Employee Education Foundation.
  • Board Member, 2010-present. National Consumer League.
  • Member, 2009-present. National JumpStart Coalition Board.
  • Mid Career Award, 2009. American Council on Consumer Interests.
  • Personal Finance Seminar for Professionals (team leader), 2009. Outstanding Educational Program, Association for Financal Counseling and Planning Education.
  • Outstanding Faculty Woman of Color, 2006. University of Maryland.
  • George F. Kramer Outstanding Practitioner Award, 2005. College of Health and Human Performance, University of Maryland.
  • Personal Finance Seminar for Professionals, 2005. East Region Finalist and National Award Winner, Dean Don Felker Financial Management Award, National Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences.
  • Outstanding Educational Program (National Initiative Management Team Member), 2005. National Extension Association of Family & Consumer Sciences.
Publications: 

Kim, J., Garman, E. T., & Sorhando, B. (in press). Credit counseling and debt management impacts on financial stressors and financial management behaviors, credit counseling, financial behavior. Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences.

Kim, J. & Chatterjee, S. (forthcoming, 2012). Childhood financial socialization and young adults financial management. Journal of Financial Counseling and Planning, 23(2).

Kim, H., DeVaney, S., & Kim, J. (forthcoming, 2012). Which low and moderate income families purchase life insurance? Family and Consumer Science Research Journal

 Cha, S., Kim, J., & Anderson, E. (2011). Chronic health condition, depression and the role of financial wellbeing: How Middle Age Group (45-64) and Older Adults (65-79) Differ? International Journal of Human Ecology, 12(2), 77-93.

Chatterjee, S. & Kim, J. (2011). Asset ownership of recent immigrants: An examination of nativity and socioeconomic factors. Migration Letters, 8(2), 141-152.

Xiao, J., Ford, M., & Kim, J. (2011). Consumer financial behavior: An interdisciplinary review of selected theories and research. Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal, 39(4), 399-414.

Kim, J., LaTaillade, & Kim, H. (2011) Family process and adolescents’ financial behaviors of adolescents.Journal of Family and Economic Issues. 32. 668-679.

Kim, H., & Kim, J. (2010). Financially Distressed Consumers' Information Search for Retirement Plans. Journal of Family Economic Issues, 31, 51-62.

Braun, B., Kim, J., & Anderson (2009). E. Family health & financial literacy—Forging the connection. Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences.

Kim, J. (2007). Workplace financial education program: Does it have an impact on employees' personal finances? Journal of Family and Consumer Science, 99(1), 43-47.

Lecturer, Health Services Administration
Director & Assistant Professor, Health Systems Administration at Georgetown University
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health

Courses

HLSA740

 

Research Assistant Professor, Behavioral and Community Health
Graduate Coordinator at SPH
Other Affiliations: UMD Prevention Research Center, Public Health Science
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1242W
Phone: (301) 405-2789 |
CV / Resume
PDF icon King-Marshall CV 2016.pdf
Biography

Evelyn King-Marshall, PhD, MPH is a research assistant professor in the Department of Behavioral and Community Health. Dr. King-Marshall received her MPH and PhD in Public Health from the University of Florida. Post MPH degree, she worked as a program manager for a state funded and county implemented Abstinence Only Sex Education Program. It was that experience that inspired her research interests; adolescent pregnancy and repeat pregnancy. During her PhD studies, she worked as a research coordinator investigating health disparities in adjuvant chemotherapy use among colorectal cancer patients and medical decision making. While she continues to work with the research team to investigate factors related to medical decision making and adjuvant chemotherapy she aspires to blend these experiences in her current research agenda.  Dr. King-Marshall’s personal research agenda has expanded to unplanned pregnancy prevention, maternal and child health, literacy, advocacy, and decision making. She is currently using qualitative research methods to investigate how health literacy relates to comprehension and uptake of family planning methods. 

Education and Training

PhD, Public Health, University of Florida, 2013

MPH, Social and Behavioral Sciences, University of Florida, 2007

BS, Health Sciences,  University of Florida, 2005 

Publications: 

King-Marshall, E. C., Mueller, N., Dailey, A., Barnett, T. E., George, T. J., Sultan, S., & Curbow, B. (2016). “It is just another test they want to do”: Patient and caregiver understanding of the colonoscopy procedure. Patient education and counseling, 99(4), 651-658.

Curbow, B. A., Dailey, A. B., King-Marshall, E. C., Barnett, T. E., Schumacher, J. R., Sultan, S., & George Jr, T. J. (2015). Pathways to colonoscopy in the South: seeds of health disparities. American journal of public health, 105(4), e103-e111.

King, J. L., Pomeranz, J. L., Barnett, T. E., King-Marshall, E., Nguyen, J., & Curbow, B. (2015). Poor health among smokers obtaining colonoscopy screening: making the case for cessation intervention. Public health, 129(5), 545-548.

Professor, Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Associate Dean for Research
Other Affiliations: UMD Prevention Research Center, Office of the Dean
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2242P
Phone: (301) 405-7201 |
Biography

Dr. Dushanka V. Kleinman is the Associate Dean for Research and Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics in the University of Maryland School of Public Health. She is a senior science leader at the University of Maryland College Park and in these roles works closely with faculty at the School, University and across the University System campuses to contribute to identifying and supporting proposals for emerging research and research training opportunities. Her recent research interests include prevention of oral health disparities, health literacy, and strategies to integrate oral and general health as well as primary care with public health and social services. In 2011-12, Dr. Kleinman led a comprehensive public health impact study of Prince George’s County, Maryland, with a multidisciplinary faculty study team representing four of the School’s six departments, that applied both quantitative and qualitative methods and worked closely with a diverse group of stakeholders from all sectors. The study was guided by key questions designed to inform decision-making by geopolitical entities, health care systems, academic partners and legislative bodies. The findings from the resulting document, which includes seven technical reports and a summary, has stimulated and informed activities at local, regional and state levels.  The full report can be accessed at: www.sph.umd.edu/princegeorgeshealth.

Prior to joining the University of Maryland, Dr. Kleinman, a Board Certified specialist in Dental Public Health, completed 28 years of government service where she served as Deputy Director, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, NIH and Assistant Surgeon General (Rear Admiral), U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) Commissioned Corps. In 2006 she completed a five year term as the 15th Chief Dental Officer, USPHS. She was the co-editor, and coordinated the federal involvement in the development, of the first-ever Surgeon General's report on oral health (2000). At NIH she assumed the role of NIDCR Acting Director twice during transitions between directors and also served as the first assistant director of the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research.

Education and Training

Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Boston University: M.Sc.D. in Dental Public Health and Certificate 1976

University of Chicago Hospitals and Clinics: Rotating Dental Internship 1974

College of Dentistry, University of Illinois at Chicago: D.D. S. 1973

University of Wisconsin, Madison: B.S. (Zoology) 1969

Honors and Awards

2013 William J. Gies Award, American College of Dentists

2011 Callahan Medal, Ohio Dental Association

2011 Surgeon General David Satcher Keynote Lecturer, Commissioned Officers Association

2007 American Dental Association Distinguished Service Award

2007 American Association of Dental Research Jack Hein Public Service Award

2007 USPHS Surgeon General’s Medallion

2007 USPHS Surgeon General’s Exemplary Service Medal

2006 Honorary Degree, University of Southern California

Publications: 

Horowitz AM, Maybury C, Kleinman DV, Radice SR, Wang MQ, Child W, Rudd RE. Health literacy environmental scans of community-based dental clinics in Maryland. Am J Public Health.2014;104:e85-e93.

Horowitz AM, Clovis JC, Kleinman DV, Wang MQ. Use of recommended communication techniques by Maryland dental hygienists.  J Dent Hygiene. 2013; 4:181-1192.

Maybury C, Horowitz AM, Wang MQ, Kleinman DV. Communication techniques used by Maryland Dentists. J Am Dent Assoc. 2013;144:1386-1396.

Horowitz AM, Kleinman DV, Wang MQ. What Maryland Adults with Young Children Know and do about Preventing Dental Caries. Am J Pub Health. 2013;103:e69-e76. 

Horowitz AM, Wang MQ, Kleinman DV. Opinions of Maryland Adults Regarding Communication Practices of Dentists and Staff. J Health Comm 2012;17: 1204-1214.

Huerta MF, Farber GK, Wilder EL, Kleinman DV, Grady PA, Schwartz DA, Tabak LA. NIH Roadmap interdisciplinary research initiatives.  PLoS Comput Biol. 2005 Nov;1(6):e59.

Winn DM, Diehl SR, Brown LM, Harty LC, Bravo-Otero, E, Fraumeni JF Jr., Kleinman DV, Hayes RB.  Mouthwash in the etiology of oral cancer in Puerto Rico.  Cancer Causes and Control, 2001;12:419-429.

Evans CA, Kleinman DV. Co-Executive Editors: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General.  Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, 2000. 

Hayes RB, Bravo-Otero E, Kleinman DV, Brown LM, Fraumeni JF Jr, Harty LC, Winn DM. Tobacco and alcohol use and oral cancer in Puerto Rico. Cancer Causes Control 1999;10:27-33.

Harty LC, Caporaso NE, Hayes RB, Winn DM, Bravo-Otero E, Blot WJ, Kleinman DV, Brown LM, Armenian HK,Fraumeni JF and Shields PG. Alcohol Dehydrogenase 3 Genotype and Risk of Oral Cavity and Pharyngeal Cancer. J Nat Cancer Inst 1997; 89(12):1698-1705.

Tomar SL, Winn DM, Swango PA, Giovino GA, Kleinman DV. Oral mucosal smokeless tobacco lesions among adolescents in the United States. J Dent Res, 1997; 76:277-86.

Tomar S, Swango P, Kleinman DV, Burt B. Periodontal attachment loss in HIV‑seropositive military personnel. J Periodontol, 1995:66:421‑28.

Kleinman DV, Swango PA, Pindborg JJ. Epidemiology of oral mucosal lesions in US School Children, 1986‑87. Community Dent Oral Epid 1994; 22:243-53.

Kleinman DV, Swango PA, Pindborg JJ, Gupta P. Toward assessing trends in oral mucosal lesions: Lessons learned from oral cancer. Adv Dent Res 1993;7: 32‑41.

Kleinman DV, Swango PA, Niessen LC. Epidemiologic studies of oral mucosal conditions: Methodologic issues. Community Dent Oral Epidemiol 1991; 19:129‑40.

Additional Publications: http://tinyurl.com/DVK-Bibliography

Joanne Klossner
Lecturer, Kinesiology
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health

Office Hours: 

Tuesday / Thursday 10:00 - 11:00 am; Appointments by request (preferred)

CV / Resume
PDF icon VITA Klossner- REV.7-29-15.pdf
Biography

Joanne Klossner earned a Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology and a Doctorate of Philosophy in Curriculum Studies from Indiana University.  She earned her Master of Arts in Athletic Training from the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill.  Dr. Klossner has numerous years of clinical experience as a certified athletic trainer prior to teaching a wide variety of athletic training and physical education courses at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.  She recently joined the UMD faculty as a Lecturer in the Department of Kinesiology. Prior to moving to Maryland she was a faculty member for 10 years within Indiana University's (IU) School of Public Health in Bloomington. While at IU she was a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Kinesiology and served as the Clinical Education Coordinator of the Athletic Training Program. She has published in peer-reviewed journals, presented locally and nationally, and has participated in various campus, community, and professional service activities.  Dr. Klossner has a wide variety of research and professional interests particularly related to experiential education, service-learning and the socialization of professional students. She has expertise in qualitative research and scholarship of teaching and learning (SOTL) methodologies. She is currently working on projects related to the professional socialization of doctoral students pursuing careers as faculty in higher education, the self-efficacy of novice athletic trainers, and the role of direct service-learning on the professional development of first year athletic training students within a framework of civic professionalism. Dr. Klossner is married to David Klossner who works within the UMD Department of Intercollegiate Athletics. Together they have two children.

Instructor, Kinesiology
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2351
Phone: (301) 405-2450 |
Senior Vice President and Chief Technical Officer, Applied Environmental Health (MIAEH)
Adjunct in MIAEH
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health

CV / Resume
PDF icon Ivor Knight CV.pdf
Biography

Dr. Ivor Knight established the Research & Development division of Canon U.S. Life Sciences, Inc. He has over two decades experience in molecular genetic research and the development of DNA-based diagnostic systems. His research interests include rapid molecular genetic techniques for pathogen detection, human genetics and diagnostic applications as well as the global movement of infectious disease agents and international cooperation to control infectious diseases.

Education and Training

Ph.D., Microbiology, University of Maryland- College Park B.S., Animal and Veterinary Science, West Virginia University

Adjunct Faculty, Family Science
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1142F School of Public Health
Phone: (301) 405-3672 |
Adjunct Professor, Family Science
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1142,School of Public Health.
Phone: 301.405.3672 |
Professor Emerita, Family Science
Other Affiliations: UMD Prevention Research Center
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1142E,School of Public Health

Office Hours: 

Call or e-mail for appointment

CV / Resume
PDF icon Koblinsky CV February 2016.pdf
Biography

Sally A. Koblinsky, Ph.D., is a Professor of Family Science and Associate Dean for Diversity and Inclusion at the University of Maryland School of Public Health. She recently served as the University’s Assistant President and Chief of Staff (2008-11) and was formerly Chair of Family Science (1996-2008) and Acting Associate Dean of Administrative Affairs in the School of Public Health (2005-2007). Her research and publications focus primarily on family relations, parenting, and child/adolescent development in low income families, examining predictors of risk and resilience. She has received federal, state, and foundation grant support for 26 research and demonstration projects, including those that evaluate community-based interventions targeting behavioral health of veterans and their family members, community violence, substance abuse prevention, parenting, homelessness, adolescent pregnancy prevention, school-age child care, and nutrition.  She has authored over 100 refereed articles, chapters, and other publications, and presented more than 130 refereed papers at national conferences.

Dr. Koblinsky has been actively involved in designing, implementing, and evaluating programs for veterans and service members, including those returning to college from the OIF/OEF conflicts. She is Principal Investigator of a state grant from the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, titled the Maryland Veterans Resilience Initiative: Enhancing Veterans’ Behavioral Health. The project has completed a needs assessment of more than 3,000 state behavioral and primary health care providers examining their ability to address veterans’ needs, and has trained over 750 behavioral health professionals in use of best practices for treating PTSD, Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), sleep disorders, suicide ideation, substance abuse, and women veterans’ health problems, among other conditions. The project is also building peer support programs for student veterans at community colleges and four -year institutions across the state. She is also Principal Investigator of a second state grant, Enhancing Women Veterans’ Behavioral Health funded by the state of Maryland. Dr. Koblinsky serves as Evaluator of Serving Together, a 4-year Robert Wood Johnson Foundation grant that is coordinating and strengthening behavioral health and other support services for military families in Montgomery County, MD. She created and directs the University’s Military Families Internship program, which has prepared more than 70 college seniors to work with veterans, service members, and their families at area military installations, health centers, and nonprofit agencies addressing military family needs.

Education and Training

Ph.D., Human Development and Family Science/Psychological Assessment, Oregon State University, 1979

M.A., Developmental Psychology, San Francisco State University, 1973

A.B., Psychology, University of California at Santa Cruz, Psychology, 1971

Courses

Current:

  • FMSC 477: Military Families Internship
  • FMSC 730: Key Topics in Maternal and Child Health
  • FMSC 789: Preparing Future Faculty and Professionals Seminar

Past:    

  • FMSC332: Children in Families
  • FMSC381: Poverty, Affluence, and Families
  • FMSC603: Programmatic Approaches to Family Problems
  • FMSC700: Research Methods in Family Science
Honors and Awards

Outstanding Undergraduate Mentor Award, Department of Family Science, 2015

Honorary Woman Veteran Award, Women Veterans Interactive Foundation, 2013

ADVANCE Professor, University of Maryland, 2012-2013

University of Maryland School of Public Health Jerry P. Wrenn Outstanding Service Award, 2012

University of Maryland Defender of Diversity Award. Annual award of the UMCP President’s Commission on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Issues, 2011

Outstanding Service and Commitment to Women and Women’s Issues at UMCP: Plaque received from UMCP President’s Commission on Women’s Issues, 2011

Fellow, American Council on Education, Washington, D.C., 2002-03

Outstanding Woman on Campus for the Academic Year 2000, President’s Commission on Women’s Issues, University of Maryland, College Park, 2000

Administrator Award for Outstanding Academic Unit, Annual Minority Achievement Awards, President’s Commission on Ethnic Minority Issues, University of Maryland, 1997

Collaborators

Dr. Leigh Leslie (Military Families)

Publications: 

Koblinsky, S.A., Hrapczynski, K.M., & Clark, J.E. (2015). Preparing future faculty and professionals for public health careers. American Journal of Public Health, 105 (S1), S125-S131. http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2014.302509

Koblinsky, S.A., Hrapczynski, K.M., & Leslie, L.A. (2015). Treating veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan: A state needs assessment of civilian physicians in internal and family medicine. Journal of General Practice, 3(1). ISSN: 2329-9126. http://esciencecentral.org/journals/treating-veterans-of-iraq-and-afghanistan-a-state-needs-assessment-of-civilian-physicians-in-internal-and-family-medicine-2329-9126.1000195.php?aid=39866

Vora, K.S., Koblinsky, S.A., & Koblinsky, M.A. (2015). Predictors of maternal health services utilization by poor, rural women: A comparative study in Indian states of Gujarat and Tamil Nadu. Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition, 33(9). DOI: 10.1186/s41043-015-0025-x; http://www.jhpn.org/content/33/1/9

Koblinsky, S.A., Leslie, L., & Cook, E.T. (2014). Treating behavioral health conditions of OEF/OIF veterans and their families: A state needs assessment of civilian providers. Military Behavioral Health, 2, 162-172. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4066932/

Maring, E.F., and Koblinsky, S.A. (2013). Teachers’ challenges, strategies, and support needs in schools affected by community violence: A qualitative study. Journal of School Health, 83, 379-388.  

Koblinsky, S.A., & Okolo, Z. (2012).  Military Families Internship:  Strengthening families and communities. National Council on Family Relations Report, 57(1), 6-8.

Oravecz, L.M., Osteen, P.J., Sharpe, T.L., Randolph, S.M. & Koblinsky, S.A.(2011). Assessing low-income African-American preschoolers’ behavior problems in relationship to community violence, inter-partner conflict, parenting, informal social support and social skills. Child & Family Social Work, 16(3), 310-324.

Pinzon, A., Koblinsky, S.A., & Hofferth, S. (2009).  Work-related injuries of child street laborers in Latin American cities: Prevalence and predictors.  Pan American Journal of Public Health, 26(3), 235-243.

Ji, C. S., & Koblinsky, S.A.  (2009). Parent involvement in children’s education:  An exploratory study of urban, Chinese immigrant families. Urban Education, 44(6), 687-709.

Koblinsky, S.A., Buckmiller, N., Leslie, L., & Roy, K..M. (2008). Voices of student veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars. College Park, MD: University of Maryland.

Oravecz, L.A., Koblinsky, S.A., & Randolph, S.M. (2008). Community violence, family conflict, parenting, and social support as predictors of the social competence of African American preschool children. Journal of Black Psychology, 34(2), 192-216

Koblinsky, S. A., Kuvalanka, K., & Randolph, S. M. (2006).  Social skills and behavior problems of urban, African American preschoolers: Role of parenting practices, family conflict, and maternal depression. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 76(4), 554-563.

Koblinsky, S. A., Kuvalanka, K., McClintock-Comeaux, M. (2006). Preparing Future Faculty and Family Professionals. Family Relations, 55, 29-43.

Letiecq, B. L., & Koblinsky, S. A. (2004). Parenting in violent neighborhoods: African American fathers’ strategies for keeping children safe. Journal of Family Issues25(6), 715-734.

Assistant Professor, Kinesiology
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2134B
Phone: (301) 405-2502 |
Office Hours: 

Tuesdays 12:30-1:30 PM

Biography

Dr. Kuzmiak-Glancy is a lifelong athlete who has merged her love of playing sports with her research focus. After studying Exercise Physiology as an undergraduate at Rutgers University, she became captivated by mitochondrial energetics during her Ph.D. at Arizona State University. Dr. Kuzmiak-Glancy’s research focuses on determining how cardiac mitochondrial energy production is exquisitely matched to energy demand and how this coordination is altered during exercise and in disease. 

Education and Training

Postdoctoral Training

National Lung, Blood, Heart Institute
National Institutes of Health 
2016


Postdoctoral Training 

Biomedical Engineering 
George Washington University 
2012-2016


Ph.D. 

Biology
Arizona State University 
2012


B.S.

Exercise Science
Rutgers University
2008

Hyun Joon Kwon
Research Assistant Professor, Kinesiology
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: off campus
Phone: (301) 405-2569 |
Lecturer, Behavioral and Community Health
Faculty Affiliate, The Herschel S. Horowitz Center for Health Literacy
Other Affiliations: Horowitz Center for Health Literacy
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2320
Phone: (301) 405-3427 |
Office Hours: 

Please email to make an appointment.

CV / Resume
PDF icon LaToucheHowardCV.pdf
Biography

Sylvette La Touche-Howard, PhD, NCC, CHES serves as a Faculty Lecturer in the Department of Behavioral and Community Health. Effective January 2017, Dr. La Touche-Howard will also serve as the SPH Graduate Professional and Career Development Coordinator. Dr. La Touche-Howard's passion is in proactively working with individuals and communities to affect behavior change and reduce health disparities through the use of effective health education, communication and promotion. Dr. La Touche-Howard has served on several curriculum development teams that have had state and national impacts. Her past research has included work in the reduction of health disparities in the area of HIV/AIDS, depression, cardiovascular disease and substance abuse. Currently, Dr. La Touche-Howard is working on the creation, dissemination and implementation plan for Behavioral Health in Prince George’s County.

 

Education and Training

McGill University, Bachelor of Arts, Psychology and Women's Studies 

Andrews University, MA, Mental Health Community Counseling

University of Maryland, College Park, PhD, Behavioral and Community Health

Courses

HLTH 140-Personal and Community Health 

HLTH230-Introduction to Health Behavior 

HLTH 371-Communicating Safety and Health

HLTH 391-Principles of Community Health I 

HLTH 460-Minority Health

HLTH 471-Women's Health

HLTH 490-Principles of Community Health II  

Collaborators

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygeine

Prince George's County Health Department 

Assistant Professor (Joint Appointment), Behavioral and Community Health
Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine
Other Affiliations: UMD Prevention Research Center
Campus: UMB | Building: Howard Hall | Room: 102
Phone: (410)706-7865 |
Website: 
University of Maryland School of Medicine profile
Professor, Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Affiliated Faculty, Applied Mathematics & Statistics, and Scientific Computation (AMSC) Program, Mathematics Department; Affiliated Faculty, Center for Health Information and Decision Systems (CHIDS), Robert H. Smith School of Business
Other Affiliations: Applied Environmental Health (MIAEH), Biostatistics Risk Assessment Center, UMD Prevention Research Center
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health, Building 255 | Room: 2234R
Phone: 301-405-4581 |
Website: 
Biostatistics & Risk Assessment Center
Office Hours: 

1pm to 2pm on Wednesdays during the Fall Semester in 2016.

Biography

Dr. Mei-Ling Ting Lee is Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Director of the Biostatistics and Risk Assessment Center (BRAC) at the University of Maryland, College Park. With over 35 years of experience, Dr. Lee has a broad background in statistical and applied probability modelling with applications to aging studies, cancer, child birth, epidemiology, microbiology, genomics, and other biomedical areas. Dr. Lee's current research includes the following areas: (a) Threshold Regression Models for Risk Assessments: with applications in lung cancer, osteoporotic fractures, pre-term delivery, and modeling return-to-work after traumatic injury; (b) Statistical Methods for Genomic and Proteomic Data: with application in cancer; (c) Rank-based Nonparametric Tests for Correlated Data: with applications in epidemiology; (d) Multivariate Distributional Theory: with applications in marketing research and multivariate meta-analysis for diagnostic test accuracy; (e) Statistical methods in Patient Outcome Research: with applications to data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS).

Dr. Lee has many years of experience in analyzing large scale high-dimensional data sets drawn from genomics and proteomics. Her single-authored monograph titled "Analysis of Microarray Gene Expression Data" published in 2004 has been widely used as a reference/textbook for genomic research. The book includes sample size and power calculations for microarray studies and several chapters on machine learning bioinformatics methods. The power calculation program is available online on Dr. Lee’s research website and has been used by many researchers in the world.

Dr. Lee is the founding editor and editor-in-chief of the international journal Lifetime Data Analysis, the only international statistical journal that is specialized in modeling time-to-event data. The journal is currently publishing the twenty-second volume. Dr. Lee has also co-edited three other books: Lifetime Data Models in Reliability and Survival Analysis (1995); Measurement and Statistical Analysis for Quality of Lifetime Data (2002); Risk Assessment and Evaluation of Prediction (2013).

Please visit Dr. Lee's research webpages for  publications and access to computer software packages.

Education and Training

Education and training:

       B.S.     National Taiwan University (Mathematics)

       M.S.     National Tsing Hua University (Mathematics)

       M.A.     University of Pittsburgh (Mathematics)

       Ph.D.   University of Pittsburgh (Mathematics/Statistics)

Courses

EPIB 653: Applied Survival Data Analysis (Syllabus)

EPIB 788: Critical Readings (Syllabus)

Honors and Awards

1995    Elected Member, International Statistical Institute, the Netherlands

1998    Elected Fellow, Royal Statistical Society, United Kingdom

1999    Elected Fellow, American Statistical Association, USA

2005    Elected Fellow, Institute of Mathematical Statistics, USA

2005    Mosteller Statistician of the Year, American Statistical Association, Boston chapter

2014    Service Award: Cellular Tissue & Gene Therapy Advisory Committee, US Food & Drug Administration

2016    President, International Chinese Statistical Association

Associate Professor, Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Member, Population Science Program within the University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center Program in Oncology
Other Affiliations: UMD Prevention Research Center
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2234C
Phone: (301) 405-7251 |
Website: 
Maryland Asian American Health Studies
Office Hours: 

Office hours by appointment.

CV / Resume
PDF icon Sunmin Lee CV Nov 2017.pdf
Biography

Dr. Sunmin Lee is a social epidemiologist with a main research interest in reducing health disparities among racial/ethnic minority populations, especially among Asian Americans. She has incorporated both quantitative and qualitative research methods and has conducted both epidemiologic and intervention studies, to comprehensively examine the etiologies of health disparities and design and implement randomized controlled trials that are culturally and linguistically appropriate to reduce heath disparities. She has conducted epidemiologic studies examining effect of acculturation on immigrants’ health and led or participated in multiple NIH- and CDC-funded studies to increase colorectal cancer screening, hepatitis B screening and vaccination, and improve breast cancer survivorship among Asian Americans. 

Currently, she leads an NIH-funded R01 study to increase colorectal cancer screening among Chinese and Korean Americans using shared decision making aproach. More details on current and past projects can be found here.

 

Education and Training

ScD, Social Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health

MPH, Health Policy, Seoul National University

BA, English Literature, Seoul National University

Courses

EPIB 622: Social Determinants of Health (Syllabus)

Publications: 

Juon HS, Rimal R, Lee S. Social Norms, Family Communication, and Hepatitis B Screening among Asian Americans. J Health Comm. In Press.

Juon HS, Guo J, Lee S. Predictors of colorectal cancer screening among Asian Americans aged 50-75 years old. J Racial Ethn Health Disparities. In Press. PMID: 28664503.

Jung MY, Holt CL, Ng D, Sim H, Lu XX, Le D, Juon HS, Li J, Lee S. Chinese and Korean American immigrant experience: A mixed-methods examination of facilitators and barriers of colorectal cancer screening. Ethn Health. 25:1-20, 2017.

Juon HS, Kim F, Strong C, Park E, Lee S. Hepatitis B virus infection and exposure among non-native Chinese-, Korean-, and Vietnamese Americans in the Baltimore Washington metropolitan area. Hepatitis Monthly. 17(1): e43018, 2017.

Lu X, Juon HS, Lee S. Do recommendations by healthcare providers, family-members, friends, and individual self-efficacy increase uptake of hepatitis B screening? Results of a population-based study of Asian Americans. Int J MCH AIDS. 6(1), 9-18, 2017.

Lu X, Holt CL, Chen JC, Le D, Chen J, Kim G-Y, Li J, Lee S. Is colorectal cancer a Western disease? Role of knowledge and influence of misconception on colorectal cancer screening among Chinese and Korean Americans: A mixed methods study. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 17(11): 4885-4892, 2016.

Lu X, Sim HJ, Juon HS, Lee S. Hypertension among Asian Americans: Associations with measures of acculturation. Am J Health Stud. 31(3): 132-142, 2016.

Lee S, Chae DH, Jung MY, Chen L, Juon HS. Health examination is not a priority for less acculturated Asian Americans. J Racial Ethn Health Disparities. 1-10, 2016.

Jaschek G, Carter-Pokras OD, He X, Lee S, Canino G. Association of types of life events with depressive symptoms among Puerto Rican youth. PLoS ONE. 11(10): e0164852, 2016.

Jaschek G, Carter-Pokras O, He X, Lee S, Canino G. Association of child maltreatment and depressive symptoms among Puerto Rican youth. Child Abuse Negl. 58: 63-71, 2016.

Juon HS, Strong C, Kim F, Park E, Lee S. Lay health worker intervention improved compliance with hepatitis B vaccination in Asian Americans: Randomized controlled trial. PLoS ONE. 11(9), e0162683. 2016.

Kim J, Cha S, Kawachi I, Lee S. Does retirement promote healthy behaviors in Korean young elderly? J Behav Health. 5(2): 45-54, 2016.

Young DR, Lee S, Kuo J, Saksvig BI. Co-occurring social and dietary health-promoting behaviors and physical activity among high school girls. Health Behav Policy Rev. 3(1): 3-12, 2016.

Lee S, Zhai S, Zhang G, Ma XS, Lu X, Tan Y, Siu P, Seals B, and Ma GX.  Factors associatedwith Hepatitis C knowledge before and after an educational intervention among Vietnamese Americans. Clin Med Insights: Gastroenterol. 29(8):45-53, 2015.

Kanamori M, Carter-Pokras O, Madhavan S, Feldman R, He X, Lee S. Overweight status of the primary caregivers of orphan and vulnerable children in 3 Southern African countries: A cross sectional study. BMC Public Health. 15:757, 2015.

Ma GX, Tan Y, Jung M, Ma XS, Toubbeh J, Ma X. and Lee S. Factors associated with hepatitis C screening behaviors and infection status among Vietnamese Americans. Am J Health Behav. 39(5): 640-51, 2015.

Kanamori M, Carter-Pokras O, Madhavan S, Lee S, He X, Feldman R. Association between orphan and vulnerable child caregiving, household wealth disparities, and women's overweight status in three southern African countries participating in demographic health surveys. Matern Child Health J. 19(8):1662-71, 2015.

Martinez-Garcia G, Atkinson N, Carter-Pokras O, Portnoy B, Lee S. Do Latino youth really want to get pregnant? Assessing pregnancy wantedness among male and female Latino youth. Am J Sex Educ. 9(3):329-346, 2014.

Lee S, Kim D. Acculturation and self-rated health among foreign women in Korea. Health and Social Welfare Review. 34(2): 453-482, 2014 

Kanamori M, Carter-Pokras O, Madhavan S, Feldman R, He X, Lee S. Orphan/vulnerable child caregiving moderates the association between women’s autonomy and their BMI in three African countries. AIDS Care. 3:1-10, 2014. 

Juon HS, Lee S, Kirk G, Bowie J, Rimal R. Effect of a liver cancer education program on hepatitis B screening among Asian Americans in the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area, 2009-2010. Prev Chronic Dis. 11:130258, 2014. 

Lee S, Chen L, Jung MY, Baezconde-Garbanati L, Juon HS. Acculturation and cancer screening among Asian Americans: Role of health insurance and having a regular physician. J Community Health. 39(2):201-12, 2014. 

Young DR, Saksvig BI, Wu TT, Zook K, Li X, Champaloux S, Grieser M, Lee S, Treuth M. Multilevel correlates of physical activity for early, mid, and late adolescent girls. J Phys Act Health. 11(5), 2014. 

Ihara ES, Chae DH, Cummings J, Lee S. Correlates of mental health service use and type among Asian Americans. Admin Pol Ment Health. 1-9, 2013.

Lee S, Yoon H, Chen L, Juon HS. Culturally tailored photonovel development for hepatitis B prevention in Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese American communities in Maryland. Health Educ Behav. 40(6): 694-703, 2013.

Lee S, O’Neill A, Ihara ES, Chae DH. Change in self-reported health status among immigrants in the United States: Associations with measures of acculturation. PLos ONE. 8(10): e76494, 2013.

Lee S, Chen L, Ma GX, Fang CY, Oh Y, Scully L. Challenges and needs of Chinese and Korean American breast cancer survivors: In-depth interviews. N Am J Med Sci (Boston). 6(1):1-8, 2013.

Lee S, Chen L, He X, Miller MJ, Juon HS. A cluster analytic examination of acculturation and health status among Asian Americans in the Washington DC metropolitan area, United States. Soc Sci Med. 96:17-23, 2013.

O’Neill A, Lee S, Yan A, Voorhees CC. Association between weather and physical activity in Baltimore teens. Environ Behav. 45(1):138-151, 2013.

Clough J, Lee S, Chae DH. Barriers to health care among Asian immigrants in the United States: A traditional review. J Health Care Poor Underserved. 24(1):384-403, 2013.

Tanaka M, Strong C, Lee S, Juon HS. Influence of information sources on hepatitis B screening behavior and relevant psychosocial factors among Asian immigrants. J Immigr Minor Health. 15(4):779-87, 2013.

Lee S, Young DR, Pratt CA, Jobe JB, Chae SE, McMurray RG, Johnson CC, Going SB, Elder JP, Stevens J. Effects of parents' employment status on changes in body mass index and percent body fat in adolescent girls. Child Obes. 8(6):526-32, 2012.

Ma GX, Gao W, Lee S, Wang MQ, Tan Y, Shive SE. Health seeking behavioral analysis associated with breast cancer screening among Asian American women. Int J Women Health. 4:235-243, 2012.

Lee S, Chen L, Ma GX, Fang CY. What is lacking in patient-physician communication: Perspectives from Asian American breast cancer patients and oncologists. J Behav Health. 1(2):102-109, 2012.

Strong C, Lee S, Tanaka M, Juon HS. Ethnic differences in prevalence and barriers to HBV screening and vaccination among Asian Americans. J Community Health . 37(5):1071-80, 2012.

Lee S, O’Neill A, Park J, Scully L, Shenassa ED. Health insurance moderates the association between length of stay and health in legal immigrants. J Immigr Minor Health. 14(2):345-349, 2012.

Chen L, Juon HS, Lee S. Acculturation and BMI among Chinese, Korean and Vietnamese adults. J Community Health. 37(3):539-546, 2012.

Chae DH, Lee S, Lincoln KD, Ihara ES. Discrimination, family relations, and major depression among Asian Americans. J Immigr Minor Health. 14(3):361-70, 2012.

Philbin MM, Erby LAH, Lee S, Joun HS. hepatitis B and liver cancer among three Asian American sub-groups: A focus group inquiry. J Immigr Minor Health. 14(5):858-68, 2012.

Lee S, Ma GX, Juon HS, Martinez G, Hsu CE, Bawa J. Assessing the needs and guiding the future: Findings from the health needs assessment in 13 Asian American communities of Maryland in the United States. J Immigr Minor Health. 13(2):395-401, 2011.

Ma GX, Lee S, Wang M, Tan Y, Gao W, Ma X, Lai P, Toubbeh JI. Role of sociocultural factors in hepatitis B screening among Asian Americans. South Medi J. 104(7):466-72, 2011.

Ayers JW, Juon HS, Lee S, Park E. Hepatitis B vaccination prevalence and its predictors among Asian, Pacific Islander, Native American, and multiracial groups in NHANES. J Immigr Minor Health. 12(6):847-52, 2010.

Choi KS, Lee S, Park EC, Kwak MS, Spring B, Juon HS. Low rates of breast cancer screening in Korean women compared with Korean American women and White women. J Women Health. 19(6):1089-1096, 2010.

Lee S, Martinez G, Ma GX, Hsu CE, Robinson ES, Bawa J, Juon HS. Access barriers and health care in 13 Asian American communities. Am J Health Behav. 34(1):21-30, 2010.

Lee S, Juon HS, Martinez G, Hsu CE, Robinson ES, Bawa J, Ma GX. Model minority at risk: Expressed needs of mental health by Asian American youth. J Commun Health. (34):144-152, 2009.

Juon HS, Choi KS, Park EC, Kawk MS, Lee S. Hepatitis B vaccinations among Koreans: Results from 2005 Korea National Cancer Screening Survey. BMC Infect Dis. 25(9):185, 2009.

Lee S, Martinez G, Hsu CE, and Maryland Asian American Health Solutions. Asian American Health Priority: Strengths, Needs and Opportunities for Action: A study of Montgomery County, MD, 2008. Asian American Health Initiative, Department of Health and Human Services, Montgomery County, Maryland. 2008.

Tworoger SS, Lee S, Schernhammer ES, Grodstein F. The association of sleep duration, difficulty sleeping, and snoring with cognitive function in older women. Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 20(1):41-48, 2006.

Lee S, Buring JE, Cook NR, Grodstein F. The relation of education and income to cognitive function among professional women. Neuroepidemiology. 26(2):93-101, 2006.

Lee S, Cho E, Grodstein F, Kawachi I, Hu FB, Colditz GA. The effects of marital transition on changes in dietary and other health behaviors. Int J Epidemiol. 34(1):69-78, 2005.

Lee S, Kawachi I, Grodstein F. Does caregiving stress affect cognitive function in older women? J Nerv Ment Dis. 192(1):51-57, 2004.

Lee S, Colditz GA, Berkman LF, Kawachi I. Prospective study of job insecurity and coronary heart disease among US women. Ann Epidemiol. 14(1):24-30, 2004.

Lee S, Colditz GA, Berkman LF, Kawachi I. Prospective study of caregiving to non-ill children and grandchildren and coronary heart disease among US women. Am J Public Health. 93(11):1939-1944, 2003.

Lee S, Kawachi I, Berkman LF, Grodstein F. Education, other socioeconomic indicators, and cognitive function in older women. Am J Epidemiol. 157:712-720, 2003.

Lee S, Colditz GA, Berkman LF, Kawachi I. Prospective study of caregiving and coronary heart disease among US women. Am J Prev Med. 24(2):113-119, 2003.

Lee S, Colditz GA, Berkman LF, Kawachi I. Prospective study of job strain and coronary heart disease among US women. Int J Epidemiol. 31:1147-1153, 2002.

Under Review

Moshkovich O, Saksvig BI, Wu T, Lee S, Young DR. Demographic, behavioral, and school-related factors associated with duration in a diverse group of adolescent girls. Under Review.

Ng D, Slopen NB, Chen S, Lee S. Self-esteem as a mediator between sexual minority status and depressive symptoms during the transition from adolescence to adulthood. Under Review.

O’Neill AH, Beck K, Chae HD, Dyer T, He X, Lee S. The pathway from childhood maltreatment to adulthood obesity, mediated by adolescent depressive symptoms and BMI. Under Review.

Juon HS, Rimal R, Lee S. Social norms, family communication, and hepatitis B screening among Asian Americans. Under Review.

Chung SY, Lee S, Juon HS. Prevalence and factors associated with health-related quality of life among foreign-born Asian Americans. Under Review.

Juon HS, Guo J, Lee S. Predictors of colorectal cancer screening among Asian Americans aged 50-75 years old. Under Review

Associate Professor, Family Science
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1142V,School of Public Health
Phone: 301.405.4011 |
Office Hours: 

Contact via email to set up a time unless otherwise listed in Course Syllabus.

CV / Resume
Microsoft Office document icon Leslie CV February 2016.doc
Education and Training

Ph.D., Individual and Family Science, The Pennsylvania State University, 1982

Courses
  • FMSC 330 Family Theories and Patterns
  • FMSC 430 Gender Issues in Families
  • FMSC 640 Family Therapy: Theories and Techniques
  • FMSC 745 Gender and Ethnicity in Family Therapy and Service Delivery
  • FMSC 651 Clinical Methods and Consultation in Marriage and Family Therapy
  • FMSC 658 Supervised Clinical Practice of Marriage and Family Therapy
Honors and Awards

• Published six chapters and over 30 refereed articles in journals such as Journal of Marriage and the Family, Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, and Journal of Family Psychology.

• Program Chair, "Families and Health," Annual Conference of the National Council on Family Relations (2012).

• Co-editor of Gender, Families, and Close Relationships (1994). • Associate Editor, Personal Relationships (1997-2002).

• Member of editorial boards of five family journals, including Journal of Marriage and Family, Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, and Family Relations.

• Fellow, National Council on Family Relations (2004).

• Outstanding Teacher in School of Public Health (2001).

• Outstanding Teacher Award from the Campus Panhellenic Association (1990).

• Recipient of University of Maryland Summer Curriculum Transformation Project for Feminist Studies Fellowship (1989).

•Adjunct Faculty Member, Women's Studies Department, University of Maryland College Park.

• Section Chair, Feminism and Family Science, National Council on Family Relations.

• Board of Directors, National Council on Family Relations.

• Principal investigator of grant from Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues grant, Marital Quality of Interracial Couples.

• Principal Investigator of grant from the September 11 Casey Fund of the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, Providing Psychoeducational Services to a School Community Affected by September 11th.

Publications: 

Leslie, L. A., & Southard, A. (2009). Thirty years of feminist family therapy: Moving into the mainstream. In Lloyd, S., Allen, K. & Few, A. (Eds.), Handbook of Feminist Family Studies. Guilford, 328-339.

Marks, S., & Leslie, L. A. (2008). Intersectionality and work family studies. In S. Coontz, American Families: A Multicultural Reader (pp. 245-257). Routledge.

Forry, N., Leslie, L. A., & Letiecq, B. L. (2007). Marital quality in interracial relationships: The role of sex role ideology and perceived fairness. Journal of Family Issues, 12, 1538-1552.

Kelch-Oliver, K., & Leslie, L. A. (2006). Racial identity development in biracial adolescent females. Journal of Feminist Family Therapy, 18(4), 53-75.

Morton, G., & Leslie, L. A. (2005). Typologies of juvenile adolescent offenders. Journal of Feminist Family Therapy, 16(4), 30-41.

Leslie, L. A., & Letiecq, B. L. (2004). Marital quality of African American and White partners in interracial couples. Personal Relationships, 11, 559-574.

Schultz, C. M., & Leslie, L. A. (2004). Family therapy trainees' perceptions of divorced mothers: A test of bias in information recall. Family Relations, 53, 405-411.

MacDermid, S., Leslie, L., & Bissonette, L. (2002). Walking the walk. Insights from research in helping clients navigate work and family. Journal of Feminist Family Therapy, 13(2/3), 21-40.

Leslie, L. A., & Morton, G. (2001). Family therapy's response to family diversity: Looking back, looking forward. Journal of Family Issues, 22, 904-921.

Leslie, L. A., Ettenson, R., & Cumsille, P. (2000). Selecting a child care center: What parents really want.Child and Youth Care Forum, 29(5), 299-322.

Assistant Professor, Family Science
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1142K
Phone: (301) 405-3581 |
Laboratory Website: 
Teen Pregnancy and Parenting Research
CV / Resume
File Lewin CV October 2017.docx
Biography

Dr. Lewin is an Assistant Professor in Family Science, in the School of Public Health at the University of Maryland, College Park. Prior to coming to the University of Maryland in 2014, she was on the faculty of Children’s National Medical Center in Washington DC. A clinical psychologist by training, Dr. Lewin has worked to develop and rigorously evaluate primary care and school-based interventions for teen parents and their children. She has led numerous research studies on teen pregnancy and parenting, the intergenerational transmission of violence, and coparenting and father involvement. She is currently the Principal Investigator of a study evaluating a comprehensive primary care intervention for teen parents and their children. She has contributed her expertise on program evaluation in work with community partners including DC Public Schools, the Survivors’ Fund (the fund established to support survivors of the 9/11 attack on the Pentagon), and the DC Collaborative for Mental Health in Pediatric Primary Care. Dr. Lewin’s research interests include teen pregnancy and parenting; non-resident father involvement and coparenting; integration of mental health intervention into primary care; community engagement in intervention research, and addressing social, cultural, and familial determinants of health and health disparities. 

Education and Training

B.A. Duke University, Durham, NC, Psychology, 1989
Psy.D. Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ, Clinical Psychology, 1995
NIMH Postdoctoral Research Fellowship, Children’s National Medical Center, Washington, DC, 1997-1999

 

Courses
  • FMSC 332 - Children in Families
  • FMSC 660 - Program Planning and Evaluation in Family Science
Honors and Awards
  • Recipient, Rutgers University Board of Trustees Fellowship
  • Recipient, Cyril M. Franks Award for Excellence in Research
  • Peer reviewer for scholarly journals in pediatrics and psychology
  • Member of the DC Collaborative for Mental Health in Pediatric Primary Care
Publications: 

Hodgkinson, S., Godoy, L., Beers, L., & Lewin, A. (2017). Improving mental health access for low-income children and families in the primary care setting. Pediatrics.

Quinn, D., Mitchell, S.J., & Lewin, A. (2017). The role of teen mothers’ support relationships in maintenance of contraceptive use. Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology.

Lewin, A., Mitchell, S.J., Beers, L., Schmitz, K., & Boudreaux, M. (2016). Improved contraceptive use among teen mothers in a patient-centered medical home. Journal of Adolescent Health, 59, 171-176.

Lewin, A., Hodgkinson, S., Waters, D.M., Prempeh, H.A., Beers, L.S., & Feinberg, M.E. (2015). Strengthening positive coparenting in teen parents: A cultural adaptation of an evidence-based intervention. Journal of Primary Prevention, 36(2).

Lewin, A., Mitchell, S.J., Waters, D., Hodgkinson, S., Southammakosane, C., & Gilmore, J. (2015). The Protective Effects of Father Involvement for Infants of Teen Mothers with Depressive Symptoms. Maternal and Child Health Journal, 19(5), 1016-1023.

Lewin, A., Mitchell, S.J., Hodgkinson, S., Beers, L.S., & Gilmore, J. (2014). Pregnancy Intentions Among Expectant Adolescent Couples. Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology, 27, 172-176.

Hodgkinson, S., Beers, L.S., Southammakosane, C., & Lewin, A. (2014). Addressing the needs of pregnant and parenting adolescent mothers. Pediatrics, 133, 114-122.

Lewin, A., Mitchell, S.J., & Ronzio, C.R. (2013). Developmental differences in parenting behavior: Comparing adolescent, emerging adult, and adult mothers. Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, 59(1), 23-49.

Lewin, A., Mitchell, S.J., Beers, L.S., Feinberg, M.E., & Minkovitz, C.S. (2012). Coparenting in teen mothers and their children’s fathers: Evidence from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study – Birth Cohort. Academic Pediatrics, 12(5) 539-545.

Huang, Z.J., Lewin, A., Mitchell, S.J., & Zhang, J. (2012).  Variations in the relationship between maternal depression, maternal sensitivity, and child attachment by race/ethnicity and nativity: Findings from a nationally representative cohort study. Maternal and Child Health Journal, 16(1), 40-50.

Lewin, A., Mitchell, S.J., Hodgkinson, S., Burrell, L., Beers, L.S. & Duggan, A. (2011). Parental nurturance and the mental health and parenting of urban African American adolescent mothers. Journal of Family Social Work, 14(4), 311-325.

Lewin, A., Mitchell, S.J., Burrell, L., Beers, L.S. & Duggan, A. (2011). Patterns and predictors of involvement among fathers of children born to adolescent mothers. Journal of Family Social Work, 14(4), 335-353.

Lewin, A., Mitchell, S.J., Rasmussen, A., Sanders-Phillips, K., & Joseph, J.G. (2011). Do human and social capital protect young African American mothers from depression associated with ethnic discrimination and violence exposure? Journal of Black Psychology, 37(3), 286-310.

Mitchell, S.J., Lewin, A., Rasmussen, A., Horn, I.B., & Joseph, J.G. (2011). Maternal distress explains the relationship of young African American mothers’ violence exposure with their preschoolers’ behavior. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 26(3), 580-603.

Mitchell, S.J., Lewin, A., Horn, I.B., Valentine, D., Sanders-Phillips, K., & Joseph, J.G. (2010). How does violence exposure affect the psychological health and parenting of young African American mothers? Social Science & Medicine, 70, 526-533.

Mitchell, S.J., Lewin, A., & Joseph, J. G. (2009). Exploring gender differences in the association between young African American mothers’ reports of preschoolers’ violence exposure and problem behavior. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 38(4), 576-581.

Mitchell, S. J., Lewin, A., Horn, I. B., Rasmussen, A., Sanders-Phillips, K., Valentine, D., & Joseph, J. G. (2009). Violence exposure and the association between young African American mothers’ harsh discipline and child problem behavior. Academic Pediatrics, 9(3), 157-163.

Horn, I.B., Lewin, A., Turner-Musa, J., Edwards, M.C., and Joseph, J.G. (2006). The use of AAP-recommended disciplinary practice guidelines among African American caregivers of children in Head Start programs. Public Health Reports, 121, 324-30.

Razzino, B., New, M., Lewin, A., & Joseph, J. (2004). Head Start parents' need and utilization of mental health services. Psychiatric Services, 55, 583-586.

New, M. Razzino, B., Lewin, A., Schlumpf, K, and Joseph, J.G. (2002). Mental health service use in a community Head Start population. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, 156, 721-727.

 

 

 

 

Clinical Assistant Professor, Kinesiology
Other Affiliations: Public Health Science
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: off campus
Phone: (301) 405-2512 |
CV / Resume
Microsoft Office document icon Rosemary Lindle Ph.D. CV 2014.doc
Biography

Research Focus: Human Performance, Injury Prevention and Resilience in Sport, Health and Occupational Athletes. 

Research Summary: For the past 20 years, Dr. Lindle has been involved in the health and fitness field as an educator, researcher, and consultant. Currently, she works primarily with "occuaptional athletes"  i.e. public safety,  first responders, and military personnel providing  consulting services to various government, corporate and non-profit agencies including the United States Secret Service (USSS), NAVY, United States Air Force (USAF), District of Columbia Fire and Emergency Medical Services (DCFEMS) , Montgomery County Fire and Rescue (MCFR), National Volunteer Fire Council (NVFC), Center for Disease Control (CDC),  and SportFIT Training Center. She is also an adjunct faculty member in the Kinesiology Department, at the University of Maryland, School of Public Health, where she teaches a variety of exercise physiology courses. Her research focus has been in the areas of muscle physiology, biomechanics, and genetics. Her current reserach interests are in the area of performance, injury prevention and resilience of occupational athletes. 

Affiliations: American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM, National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA), American Council on Exercise (ACE), International Association of Fitness Professionals (IDEA) and National Aerobics and Ftiness Trainers Association (NAFTA). 

Education and Training

 

Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2234S
Phone: (301) 405-3102 |
Office Hours: 

Mondays 2:30 pm - 3:45 pm or by appointment

CV / Resume
PDF icon Hongjie_CV 01_17 web.pdf
Biography

Dr. Liu is a professor of epidemiology and the chair of the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics. He graduated from UCLA School of Public Health in 2002, with a doctoral degree in epidemiology.

Dr. Liu’s research focuses on social and behavioral aspects of HIV/AIDS and research methodology. In the past five years, his research projects mainly covered social and risk networks for HIV infection, stigma, text messaging in intervention delivery, survey methodology (e.g., sampling hidden populations), and advanced analytical techniques (structural equation modeling, actor-partner interdependent modeling, and psychometric analysis).

Dr. Liu has been actively and productively involved in research activities. Since 1997, he has participated, as a PI, Co-PI, or consultant, in 13 HIV-related studies in China and 8 studies in the United States. He has continuously received research funding from NIH (as PI on R03, R21, and R01 grants), the Foundation for AIDS Research (amfAR), the International Society for Infectious Diseases (ISID), the UCLA AIDS Institute, and other agencies. So far, Dr. Liu has authored a total of 96 peer-reviewed papers, including 77 publications (h-index: 27) in English journals and 19 in Chinese journals.

Education and Training

MS., Ph.D., Epidemiology

UCLA School of Public Health, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Courses

EPIB 612: Epidemiologic Study Design (Syllabus)

EPIB 740:  Advanced Methods in Epidemiology (Syllabus)

Publications: 

Publication in 2016

  1. Guida J, Hu L, and Liu H. The Impact of Occupational Stigma on the Social Networks of Older Female Sex Workers: Results from a Three-Site Egocentric Network Study in China. AIDS Patient Care and STDs, 2016;30(1):1-3.
  2. Zhang H, Teng T, Lu H, Zhao Y, Liu H, Yin L, Sun Z, He X, Qian H, Ruan Y, Shao Y, Vermund S. Poppers Use and Risky Sexual Behaviors among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Beijing, China. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 2015;160:42-48.
  3. Liu H, Morisky D, Lin X, Ma E, Jiang B, Yin Y. Bias in Self-Reported Condom Use: Association Between Over-Reported Condom Use and Syphilis in a Three-Site Study in China. AIDS and Behavior, 2016 ;20(6):1343-5.
  4. Rodriguez-Hart C#, Liu H, Nowak RG, Orazulike I, Zorowitz S, Crowell TA, Baral SD, Blattner W, Charurat M. Serosorting and Sexual Risk for HIV Infection at the Ego-Alter Dyadic Level: An Egocentric Sexual Network Study Among MSM in Nigeria. AIDS Behav. 2016.
  5. Liu H. Egocentric Network and Condom Use among Mid-Age Female Sex Workers in China: A Multilevel Modeling Analysis. AIDS Patient Care and STD 2016;30(4):155-165
  6. Liu H, Dumenci, Morisky, Xu Y, Li X, and Jiang B. Syphilis among mid-age female sex workers in China: a three-site cross-sectional study. BMJ Open, 2016.
  7. Stahlman S#, Nowak RG, Liu H, Crowell TA, Ketende S, Blattner WA, Charurat ME, Baral SD. Online Sex-Seeking Among Men who have Sex with Men in Nigeria: Implications for Online Intervention. AIDS Behav. 2016.
  8. Liu Y, Wang J, Qian HZ, Liu H, Yin L, Lu H, Zhang C, Ruan Y, Shao Y, Vermund SH. Seeking Male Sexual Partners via Internet and Traditional Venues among Chinese Men Who Have Sex with Men: Implications for HIV Risk Reduction Interventions. AIDS Behav. 2016.
  9. Xu Y, Lin X, Chen Y, Liu Y, Liu H. Ageism, resilience, coping, family support, and quality of life among older people living with HIV/AIDS in Nanning, China. Global Public Health, 2016 (Early published online)
  10. Ramadhani H#, Liu H, Nowak R, Crowell T, Ndomb T, Gaydos C, Peel S, Ndembi N, Baral S, Ake J, Charurat M. Sexual partner characteristics and incident rectal Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis infections among gay men and other men who have sex with men (MSM): a prospective cohort in Abuja and Lagos, Nigeria. Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 2016 (Early published online).
Graphic and Web Designer, Office of the Dean
Building: School of Public Health

Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health
Phone: (301) 405-0383 |

Felicia is the newest member of the Public Health Science Program. In her new role, she serves as the advisor to Public Health Science students on the College Park campus. 

Felicia has a Bachelor of Science in Marketing from the G.R. Herberger College of Business and a Master of Science in College Counseling and Student Development, both from St. Cloud State University in Minnesota . She has a great international perspective, having spent some of her professional career in Malaysia. She enjoys working with students and watching them progress through their academic journey and achieve their goals. In her spare time, she enjoys spending time with family, friends and playing with her dog.

Professor and Dean, School of Public Health, Office of the Dean
Other Affiliations: Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2242

Biography

Rear Admiral retired (RADM Ret) Boris D. Lushniak, MD, MPH, has been dean of the University of Maryland School of Public Health since January 2017.  He served as professor and chair of the Department of Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics and Professor of Dermatology, F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS) in Bethesda, Maryland before joining UMD.  

Dr. Lushniak was the U.S. Deputy Surgeon General from November 2010 to September 2015, assisting the Surgeon General in articulating the best available scientific information to the public to improve personal health and the health of the nation. He also oversaw the operations of the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS) Commissioned Corps, comprised of approximately 6,700 uniformed health officers who serve in locations around the world to promote, protect, and advance the health and safety of our nation.

Dr. Lushniak served as Acting Surgeon General from July 2013 to December 2014 and was responsible for the release of the 50th Anniversary Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health and the first ever Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Prevent Skin Cancer. From January to March 2015, he served as commander of the USPHS Monrovia Medical Unit in Liberia, the only U.S. government hospital providing care to Ebola patients.

Dr. Lushniak began his USPHS career in 1988 in the Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) and initially served with the CDC’s National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in Cincinnati, Ohio where he conducted epidemiological investigations of workplace hazards. In 1993, he completed a dermatology residency at the University of Cincinnati and established an occupational skin disease program at NIOSH. He also served on assignments in Bangladesh, St. Croix, Russia, and Kosovo, was part of the CDC/NIOSH team at Ground Zero and part of the CDC anthrax team in Washington, DC. In 2004, he transitioned from CDC to the FDA in the Office of Counterterrorism and was appointed FDA Assistant Commissioner for Counterterrorism Policy in 2005. He was deployed to Hurricane Katrina and also served as the FDA Deputy Incident Commander for the 2009 pandemic response. He was promoted to Rear Admiral, Lower Half in 2006 and attained the rank of Rear Admiral, Upper Half in 2010. He retired from the USPHS On October 1, 2015 after 27 years of service.

Dr. Lushniak was born in Chicago to post-World War II immigrants from Ukraine. He was admitted to the six-year Honors Program in Medical Education at Northwestern University and completed his B.S. degree in 1981 and M.D. in 1983. In 1984, he completed his MPH degree at Harvard University. He completed a residency in family medicine in 1987 (St Joseph Hospital, Chicago) and maintains certifications in dermatology and preventive medicine (occupational).

A firm believer in leadership by example, Dr. Lushniak also promotes the core messages of the National Prevention Strategy via his active lifestyle. He is an avid long-distance bicyclist, runner and hiker. In 2012, he scaled the summit of the most heavily-glaciated peak in the United States, Washington’s 14-thousand foot Mount Rainier and in 2015 bicycled across the state of Iowa. He resides in Rockville, Maryland with his wife Dr. Patricia Cusumano and two daughters Larissa and Stephanie.

Education and Training

BS in Medical Sciences (Honors Program in Medical Education), Northwestern University, Evanston IL

MD (Honors Program in Medical Education), Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, IL

Master of Public Health (MPH), Harvard University School of Public Health, Boston, MA 

Honors and Awards

Select Teaching and Academic Awards

  • Honorary Degree: Heidelberg University, Tiffin, OH, June 2014, Doctor of Humane Letters (Honoris causa)
  • Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Colonel George W. Hunter III Award 2013
  • Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society (Faculty/Alumni inductee 2013)
  • Delta Omega Honorary Society in Public Health (Faculty inductee 2016)
  • Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Distinguished Speaker Award 2011
  • Association of Military Surgeons of the United States, Sustaining Membership Lecture Award for Outstanding Contributions in the Field of Medical Research, November 2005

Select USPHS Awards

  • Presidential Unit Citation; September 2015; for service in the battle against Ebola
  • Surgeon General’s Medallion; September 2015; for service as Deputy Surgeon General 2014-2015
  • Distinguished Service Medal; May 2015; for service as Acting Surgeon General
  • Distinguished Service Medal; March 2014; for service as Assistant Commissioner FDA
  • Surgeon General’s Medallion; July 2013; for service as Deputy Surgeon General 2010-2013
  • Outstanding Service Medal; January 2007; Leading HHS response for Hurricane Katrina evacuees in San Antonio
  • Outstanding Unit Citation; January 2007; PHS response to Hurricane Katrina
  • Outstanding Service Medal; May 2005; NIOSH National research agenda on occupational skin disorders
  • Outstanding Unit Citation; January 2005; CDC Monkeypox Response Team
  • Outstanding Unit Citation; September 2002; PHS response to anthrax and World Trade Center

Other Awards (selected)

  • American College of Preventive Medicine Federal Preventive Medicine Medical Officer Award, February 2016
  • USUHS Distinguished Service Award for Service on the Board of Regents, January 2016
  • USPHS Commissioned Officers Foundation for the Advancement of Public Health, Health Leader of the Year Award, May 2015
  • Prevent Cancer Foundation, Special Laurel Award for Skin Cancer Prevention, April 2015
  • American Academy of Dermatology Presidential Citation, March 2015
  • American College of Preventive Medicine Ron Davis Special Recognition Award, February 2015
  • Secretary’s Award for Meritorious Service for Surgeon General’s 50th Anniversary Report on Smoking and Health, June 2014
  • Live SunSmart Foundation Apollo Award for Skin Cancer Prevention, May 2014
  • Association of Military Surgeons of the United States, Founders Medal, November 2013
  • FDA Commissioner’s Special Citation, FDA Response to the 2009 H1N1, June 2010
  • FDA Commissioner's Special Citation,  FDA Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Task Force, May 2007

 

Publications: 

Lushniak BD. The Hope Multipliers: The USPHS in Monrovia. Public Health Reports 130(6): 562-565, 2015

Lushniak BD, Alley DE, Ulin B, Graffunder C. The National Prevention Strategy: Leveraging Multiple Sectors to Improve Population Health. Am J Public Health 105(2): 229-31, 2015.

Lushniak BD. Surgeon General’s Perspectives: Family Health History: Using the Past to Improve Future Health. Public Health Reports 130(1): 3-5, 2015.

Lushniak BD. Surgeon General’s Perspectives: Quiet Heroes, Deafening Impacts. Public Health Reports 129(6): 470-1, 2014.

Lushniak BD. Surgeon General’s Perspectives: Helping Women Achieve Their Breastfeeding Goals: The Role of Hospitals. Public Health Reports 129(5): 400-1, 2014.

Lushniak BD. Remarks from the Acting Surgeon General of the United States to the 2014 Summit on Breastfeeding. Breastfeed Med 9(7):329-32, 2014.

Lushniak BD. Surgeon General’s Perspectives: Antibiotic Resistance: A Public Health Crisis. Public Health Reports 129(4): 314-6, 2014.

Lushniak BD. Surgeon General’s Perspectives: Testing Baby Boomers for Hepatitis C Virus Infection. Public Health Reports 129(3): 220-1, 2014.

Lushniak BD. Surgeon General’s Perspectives: C. Everett Koop and the National HIV/AIDS Strategy. Public Health Reports 129(2): 112-4, 2014.

Lushniak BD. Surgeon General’s Perspectives: A Historic Moment: The 50th Anniversary of the First Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health. Public Health Reports 129(1): 5-6, 2014.

Lushniak BD. Surgeon General’s Perspectives: Holiday Season Stress Free. Public Health Reports 128(6): 434-5, 2013.

Lushniak BD. Executive Perspective: Here Comes the Sun. Public Health Reports 127(4): 362-3, 2012. 

Lushniak BD. Occupational Contact Dermatitis. Dermatologic Therapy 17(3):272-277, 2004.

Lushniak BD. The importance of occupational skin diseases in the United States. Int Arch Occup Environ Health 76(5):325-330, June 2003.

Adjunct Research Professor, Family Science
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1142 School of Public Health
Phone: 301.405.3672 |
CV / Resume
PDF icon Lutter CV January 2017.pdf
Biography

Dr. Chessa Lutter has worked for more than 25 years on policies and programs to improve maternal and child nutrition in low- and middle-income countries, working with the World Health Organization (WHO), other United Nations Organizations and nongovernmental organizations.  She recently retired from a 19-year career as a Senior Advisor in Food and Nutrition at the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), the regional office of WHO for the Americas. At PAHO, she led the development and evaluation of multiple regional nutrition strategies and action plans; most recently a Plan of Action for the Prevention of Obesity in Children and Adolescents, unanimously approved by all member states in 2014. Prior to joining PAHO, she worked for the Food and Nutrition Board, U.S. National Academy of Sciences, and a nongovernmental organization dedicated to promoting breastfeeding. Her many peer-reviewed papers on child growth, breastfeeding, complementary feeding and child obesity have appeared in major nutrition and health journals. She has also led the development of several internationally-accepted PAHO/WHO documents identifying best practices in child nutrition. Dr. Lutter holds a MS and PhD in nutrition from Cornell University and a BS in natural resources from the University of California at Berkeley. 

Adjunct faculty, Health Services Administration
Interim Executive Director, Adventist HealthCare, Inc., Center for Health Equity & Wellness
Other Affiliations: Center for Health Equity
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health

CV / Resume
PDF icon CV-Academic-Marilyn Lynk 2015.pdf
Biography

Marilyn Dabady Lynk, PhD is interim executive director of the Adventist HealthCare Center for Health Equity and Wellness, the only known center that is part of a hospital system aiming to increase cultural and linguistic competence among healthcare professionals, reduce health disparities, and promote health equity in the local community. Dr. Lynk has extensive experience developing partnerships and executing strategies to improve access to and quality of health care services for underserved populations; managing an effective program to promote community health and health equity; incorporating efforts to understand health disparities and social determinants of health in community programs; organizing and facilitating health care professional and employee cultural competence training and education programs; writing grant proposals; and managing funding to support research, education, and community health programs and initiatives. She has received grant funding and awards to incorporate best practices that improve community health education, minority health, race/ethnicity data collection, and health professional training programs from the Avon Foundation, U.S. Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health, National Association for City and County Health Officials, Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission, and Montgomery County Health and Human Services.

Dr. Lynk is adjunct faculty in the School of Public Health Department of Health Services Administration. She has developed and taught diversity, cultural competence, bias and stereotyping, and race/ethnicity and language data collection to health care professionals, and trained bilingual staff to improve the care experience of limited English proficient patient populations. In addition, she is a preceptor to undergraduate and graduate student interns and has mentored high school and college students since 2008. After receiving her PhD degree, Dr. Lynk worked as a Senior Research Associate and then Study Director at The National Research Council, part of the National Academies in Washington, DC

Education and Training

PhD, Social Psychology, Yale University, 1999

MA, Psychology, Yale University, 1996

BS, Psychology, University at Albany, State University of New York, 1994

Publications: 

Adventist HealthCare Center for Health Equity and Wellness (2013). Partnering Toward a Healthier Future: 2013 Adventist HealthCare Health Equity Report. Gaithersburg, MD.

Adventist HealthCare Center for Health Equity and Wellness (2012). Partnering Toward a Healthier Future: 2012 Adventist HealthCare Health Equity Report. Gaithersburg, MD.

Altaribba, J., and Lynk, Marilyn D. (2009). Linguistic and Cultural Challenges in the Bilingual Community: Empirical and Applied Perspectives.  In L. Naciamento and G. Sousa (Eds.), Latin American Issues and Challenges.  New York:  Nova Science Publishers, Inc.

Pesquera, M., Yoder, L., and Lynk, M. (2008).  Improving cross-cultural awareness and skills to reduce disparities in cancer.  MEDSURG Nursing, 17(2), 114–121.

Mark D. Macek
Affiliate Faculty, Horowitz Center for Health Literacy
Associate Professor, Department of Health Promotion and Policy, Baltimore College of Dental Surgery Dental School
Campus: UMB | Building:

Biography

Dr. Mark D. Macek is an Associate Professor in the Health Services Research Program of the Department.  Dr. Macek served as a trainee in the CDC’s Epidemic Intelligence Service, during which he gained practical experience in the analysis and interpretation of national oral health data, including data from the National Health Interview Survey and National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.  He has authored/co-authored more than 20 publications and two textbook chapters.  Dr. Macek is a Diplomate of the American Board of Dental Public Health and is the Secretary-Treasurer of the American Association of Public Health Dentistry.  His research interests include access to and utilization of health care services, dental caries surveillance and oral health disparities.

Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2234E
Phone: (301) 405-3575 |

Karen provides administrative, budget, and personnel support for the department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics.

Jay Magaziner
Professor (Joint Appointment), Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Professor and Chair, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine
Campus: UMB | Building: 660 W. Redwood St., Howard Hall, 200
Phone: (410) 706-3553 |
Website: 
University of Maryland School of Medicine profile
CV / Resume
PDF icon MagazinerCV.pdf
Dr. Lawrence Magder
Professor (Joint Appointment), Epidemiology and Biostatistics
Professor, Dept. of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine
Campus: UMB | Building: HH | Room: 114B
Phone: (410)706-3253 |
Website: 
University of Maryland School of Medicine profile
Lecturer, Health Services Administration
Leadership Educator and Consultant
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health
Phone: 410-997-1728 |
Biography

Tracey T. Manning, Ph.D. a social and personality psychologist by training, earned her M.A. and Ph.D. at The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC and her B.A. at DePaul University, Chicago, IL.

Tracey specializes in fostering transformational leadership and influence, particularly through nontraditional forms of influence, such as nonpositional leadership, faculty leadership, women’s leadership, and volunteer leadership. Her most recent focus has been leadership communication to foster learning and empowerment in diverse audiences, notably teachers in employing growth mindsets with students and environmental professionals in communicating science to laypeople.

Tracey was formerly research associate professor, Center on Aging, and senior scholar, James MacGregor Burns Academy of Leadership, both at University of Maryland College Park (UMCP). She currently teaches graduate leadership courses in the School of Public Health at UMCP.

Tracey has also facilitated leadership development of women in nontraditional fields, particularly women faculty in higher education at several institutions through the National Science Foundation’s WELI (Women in Engineering Leadership) and ADVANCE programs. In addition, Tracey has conducted leadership workshops in the US and the UK and consulted to health care and other organizations on a wide range of leadership issues.

Previously, she was professor of psychology at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland (now Notre Dame of Maryland University), specializing in social psychology and in leadership. While at Notre Dame, as well as teaching psychology courses, Tracey coordinated and taught graduate leadership courses in the Management Program, the Nonprofit Management Program, and the undergraduate Certificate Program in Leadership and Social Change.  Her teaching excellence was honored with the Mullan Distinguished Teacher Award.

Since 2009, she has also coordinated the Howard County Legacy Leadership Institute for the Environment, which she co-founded, built on the award-winning Legacy Leadership Institutes model of lifelong learning and civic engagement developed by Dr. Laura Wilson, former Chair of Health Services Administration, UMCP. Tracey was instrumental in integrating the nonpositional leadership concentration into Legacy Leadership Institutes.

Her leadership research has appeared in Women in Management Review, the American Psychologist, the Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies, and the Journal of Leadership Education, among others. She also contributed a invited chapter on leadership and civic engagement through the life span to Civic Engagement and the Baby Boomer Generation (2006), Laura Wilson and Sharon Simson, Eds.

However Tracey considers herself primarily as a leadership educator and as a bridge-builder, translating scientific research so that others can apply it to make a positive difference in their contexts.

 

Education and Training

B.A., Psychology, DePaul University, Chicago, IL. M.A., General Psychology, The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC. Ph.D., Personality Psychology, with Social Psychology, The Catholic University of American, Washington, DC.

Courses

HLSA772 - Healthcare Leadership & Communications.  

Course Description:

Health care leaders require wide-ranging leadership knowledge and skills to aid individuals, organizations, and communities to respond effectively to 21st century social, financial, ethical, public health, and technological challenges. The Association of Schools of Public Health (2005) and the Council on Linkages between Academia and Public Health Practice (2009) identified key public health leadership competencies as transformational leadership, envisioning, collaborative leadership, and team-building. These form core objectives of HLSA 772, Healthcare Leadership & Communications.

HLSA 772 students will assess and further develop transformational leadership strengths, apply useful leadership communication principles, and critically analyze relevant leadership models, exploring their utility in addressing key leadership issues in health care or public health organizations. An underlying theme will be the identification of core values involved in health care delivery, integration of those values in personal and organizational missions, and building collaborative relationships with stakeholders to design and implement mission-based initiatives.

 

Publications: 

A SAMPLE OF SCHOLARLY PUBLICATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS
Manning, T. T. (2014, June). Communicating climate science: When it works, why it doesn’t. Presentation to NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Earth Science Division, Beltsville, MD.

Manning, T. T. (2013, February). I’m not really a leader. Keynote Presentation to Institute of Leadership International Conference: New Thinking on Leadership. Cardiff, Wales.

Manning, T. T. (2013, February). Bringing out the best in others: Efficacy and Empowerment. Presentation to the Institute of Leadership International Conference: New Thinking on Leadership. Cardiff, Wales.

Manning, T. T. (2012, October). ADVANCING collaboration and empowerment. Invited presentation to ADVANCE faculty, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland.

Manning, T. T. (2012, April). Academic leadership: Bringing out the best in others. Invited presentation to ADVANCE faculty, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland.

Manning, T. T. (2012). I’m not really a leader: The power and impact of implicit leadership theories. In Owen, H., Ed. New thinking on leadership: A global perspective. London: Kogan Page Limited.

Manning, T. T. (2011, November). Faculty as university leaders. Invited presentation to ADVANCE faculty, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland.

Manning, T. T. (2011, September). Maximizing your leadership and positive influence. Invited workshop for ADVANCE faculty, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York.

Brown, J. S. & Manning, T. T. (2010, December). Leading for creative results. Seminar for University of Maryland Center for Intelligence Operations, Vienna, Virginia.

Wilson, L. B., Harlow-Rosentraub, K., Manning, T. & Carroccio, J. (2008). Preparing for the baby boomers: Lifelong learning and civic engagement in active-adult communities. Seniors Housing & Care Journal, 16(1), 67-82.

Sykes, K., Manning, T., Campbell, P. A. & Schmeckpeper, B. J. (2008). To endow every child.... Public Policy and Aging Report, 18(2), 14-18.

Manning, T. T. & Wilson, L. B. (2007, December). Legacy Leadership Institutes: Fostering lifelong learning and civic engagement. Presentation to the Positive Aging Conference, St. Petersburg, FL.

Manning, T. T. (2007, November). The power of unlearning: Maximizing leadership learning by addressing its obstacles. Presentation to the 9th International Leadership Association Conference, Vancouver, British Columbia.

Manning, T. T. (2007). Learn to unlearn: Five key belief patterns that sabotage leadership effectiveness. Academic Leader, 23(10), 4-5, 8.

Manning, T. T. (2007, August). Attachment at work: Influence on work satisfaction and leadership in human service managers. Academy of Management Conference Panel Presentation: Good Relationships, Positive Outcomes. Philadelphia, PA.

Manning, T. T. (2007, March). The role of leadership in civic education. Keynote address to the Second Year Conference, Civic Education Project, Suez Canal University, Egypt.

Wilson, L. B., Harlow-Rosentraub, K., Manning, T., Simson, S., & Steele, J. (2007). Civic engagement and lifelong learning. Generations, 30(4), 90-94.

Manning, T. T., Wilson, L., & Harlow-Rosentraub, K. (2006-2007). Pathways to self-efficacy for civic leadership: Legacy Leadership Institutes. Panel presentation at the 8th Annual International Leadership Association Conference, Chicago, IL. November 2, 2006 and to the ASA/NCOA Conference, Chicago, IL, March 9, 2007.

Manning, T. T., Wilson, L., & Harlow-Rosentraub, K. (2006, Fall). Legacy Leadership Institutes: Strengthening leadership for community involvement in 50+ adults. Journal of Leadership Education, 5(2), 80-92.

Manning, T. T., Fitterling, J., & Kerstetter, K. (2006, March). Legacy Leadership Institutes: Promoting civic engagement and leadership in 50+ adults. Panel presentation to the ASA/NCOA Conference, Anaheim, CA.

Manning, T. T. (2006). Defining the relationship between civic engagement and leadership in later life. Invited chapter in Civic engagement and the baby boomer generation, Wilson, L. B. and Simson, S. P., Eds. New York, Haworth.

Assistant Clinical Professor, Applied Environmental Health (MIAEH), Family Science
Director of Global Health Initiatives
Other Affiliations: UMD Prevention Research Center
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1142DD
Phone: 301-405-8339 |
Office Hours: 

Mondays 2-3pm in Centreville Hall Room 1213

CV / Resume
PDF icon Maring CV Feb 2016.pdf
Biography

Dr. Maring is Director of Global Health Initiatives in the School of Public Health at the University of Maryland, College Park. She directs the Global Public Health Scholars program, a living and learning program for academically talented freshman and sophomore students. She advises Public Health without Borders (PHWB) and has led study abroad, traveling with students to India, Sierra Leone, Peru, and Ethiopia. Maring's areas of research include community violence, substance abuse, at-risk youth, healthy homes, and cross-cultural and international research on families.  She has served on masters and doctoral students’ committees and primarily mentors undergraduate student projects in global health. Maring has a background with University of Maryland Extension and as a direct service provider to low-income, high-risk adolescents and their families. She is a skilled qualitative researcher and with primary academic home in Family Science, is interested in resilience research, looking for opportunities to broaden protective factors that lead to positive health outcomes for individuals and families.

Recent Grants

  • USDA: Maryland Private Well Water Education Project (PI) (in collaboration with MIAEH)
  • ADVANCE Women in Science: Maryland Well Water Program to Achieve Testing, Education and Research [Water] (Co-PI)
  • USDA: Rural Health and Safety (Co-PI)
  • University of Maryland Extension: Part of a Larger Picture: Healthy Homes Community Health Workers Course
  • University of Maryland Extension: Maryland Private Well Water/Safe Water Education Clinics (Co-PI)
Education and Training
  • Ph.D., Family Science, University of Maryland, College Park
  • Ed.M., Risk and Prevention for Adolescent Youth, Harvard University
Courses
  • FMSC 110S Families and Global Health
  • MIEH 240 Global Health Projects: Addressing Health Needs with a Focus on Reciprocity and Relationships
  • FMSC 280 Global Child and Family Health: Getting there through Innovation
  • FMSC 332 Children in Families
  • FMSC 298F The Future of Families
  • FMSC 485 Introduction to Family Therapy
  • FMSC 477 Internship Analysis Seminar
Honors and Awards
  • Outstanding Advisor for a Student Organization, 2014 University Awards for work with Half the Sky Movement at UMD 
  • Director, Global Public Health, College Park Scholars – a living and learning program for select first and second year students.
  • Supervisor/Instructor, Northern India Study Abroad Program (Summers, 2011 & 2012)
  • Faculty Director, Engineers without Borders – Collaboration with School of Public Health in Compone, Peru (January 2013) and Sierra Leone (June 2014)
  • Co-PI,Baltimore City Healthy Homes Transition Study funded by CDC (2008-2009)
  • Awarded Leveraging Extension Mini-Grant for Healthy Homes Focus Team: A Comprehensive Approach (2007-2008)
  • Fulbright Scholar/Lecturer, Mahatma Gandhi Kashi Vidyapith and Benares Hindu University in Varanasi, India (2006-2007 academic year)
  • Project Director, Center for Substance Abuse Research (CESAR) for studies of drug trends and ecstasy use among juvenile detainees and rave attendees in the state of Maryland
  • Family Outreach Counselor, Sasha Bruce Youthwork, Inc.
  • Launched Child Care and After School Programming website, www.mcecares.org (as assistant to Dr. Susan Walker)
  • Awarded Family Studies Dissertation Support Award, June 2005
  • Awarded Center for Substance Abuse Research (CESAR) Dissertation Scholarship, May 2005
  • Awarded Distinguished Teaching Assistant, Center for Teaching Excellence, University of Maryland (2003-2004 academic year)
  • Vice President, Maryland Council on Family Relations (MCFR) (2002-2003)
Publications: 

Aldoory, L., Braun, B., & Maring, E.F., Briones, R., Duggal, M. (2015). Empowerment in the process of health messaging for rural, low-income mothers: An exploratory message design project, Women and Health.

Maring, E.F., & Koblinsky, S.K. (2013). Teachers’ Challenges, Strategies, and Support Needs in Schools affected by Community Violence: A Qualitative Study. Journal of School Health, 83(6), 379-388.

Maring, E.F., Wallen, J., Malik, B.B. (2012, December). Drug Abuse in India: Grounding Research in an Ecological Risk and Resilience Framework. Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal.

Maring, E. F. (2008). Fostering resilience against community violence among children in the United States (pp. 163-175). In D. P. Singh and M. Singh (Eds.) Violence: A concern for peaceful co-existence. Patiala, India: Publication Bureau.

Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health

Catherine Maybury
Faculty Research Assistant, Horowitz Center for Health Literacy
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2367C
Phone: (301) 405-9437 |

Catherine Maybury is a faculty research assistant in the Herschel S. Horowitz Center for Health Literacy and supports the work of Dr. Alice M. Horowitz. Catherine’s work focuses on the impact of oral health literacy on health outcomes and interventions that minimize the barriers presented by low oral health literacy, especially among low-income women and their young children. Her research interests include health literacy, chronic disease prevention and health inequities in women, adolescents and young children. Catherine is a doctoral student in the Behavioral and Community Health program and received her MPH from the same program.

Senior Project Manager and Specialist, Office of the Dean
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health
Phone: (301) 405-2550 |

Dr. Andrew McCarty oversees the School of Public Health technology infrastructure and is responsible for managing large, mission-critical projects. Dr. McCarty provides consultancy for technology initiatives and delivers trainings on topics including strategic issues related to technology and toolset usage.

Dr. McCarty’s research background focuses on enhanced adult training and workplace learning, advanced techniques to measure training outcomes, and patterns of successful technology deployment in achieving organizational objectives. Domain expertise includes servers, networking, database, mobile computing, enterprise systems, encryption/security, cloud resources, project management, workflow engineering, and process optimization.

Dr. McCarty’s previous experience includes serving in senior technology and management consulting roles with premier consulting firms for clients including many government, nonprofit, and private sector organizations. Andrew is a double alum of UMCP, with master’s and doctoral degrees from the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering and a bachelor’s degree in Physics from St. Mary’s College of Maryland.

Andrew McCarty Curriculum Vitae

 

Chief of Staff (Office of the Dean), Office of the Dean
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2242M
Phone: 301.405.2437 |
Associate Professor, Kinesiology
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2337
Phone: 301.405.2499 |
Biography

Dr. McDaniel's teaching and research are focused on marketing and media phenomena, in the area of sport management. He also holds an affiliate appointment with the Department of Communication. He has presented his work to a number of academic groups including: The American Marketing Association, The Association for Consumer Research, The American Academy of Advertising, The Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, the Society for Consumer Psychology and the North American Society for Sport Management. He has published his research in Journal of Business Research, Journal of Services Marketing, Journal of Sport Management, Psychology & Marketing and Sport Management Review, and Personality and Individual Differences. He also serves on the editorial board of several major journals in sport management, including: International Journal of Sport Marketing and Sponsorship, Journal of Sport Media, and Event Management: An International Journal. He was named a Research Fellow by the North American Society for Sport Management in 2005. Areas of Interest: - Social psychological aspects of sport consumption for spectators and participants - Effect of audience characteristics on media use and response as well as how these variables impact other aspects of consumer behavior (e.g., promotion proneness, gambling, alcohol and tobacco use)

Education and Training

Ph.D. The Florida State University, Department of Communication, Tallahassee FL. 1995. Emphasis: Marketing Communication. M.A. The University of South Florida, Department of Mass Communication, Tampa FL. 1991. Emphasis: Public Relations & Organizational Communication. B.S. Moorhead State University, Department of Mass Communication, Moorhead MN. 1985. Emphasis: Broadcast Journalism.

Courses

Undergraduate Courses: KNES 483: Sport Marketing and Media Graduate Courses: KNES 635: Foundations of Sport Management KNES 636: Sport and Mass Media KNES 735: Sport Marketing

Publications: 

Articles in Referred Journals : *McDaniel, S. R. (2002). An exploration of audience demographics, personal interests and values: Influences on viewing network coverage of the 1996 Summer Olympic Games. Journal of Sport Management, 16, pp. 117-132. *McDaniel, S. R. (2002). Investigating the roles of gambling interest and impulsive sensation seeking on consumer enjoyment of promotional games. Social Behavior and Personality, 30(1), pp. 53-64. *McDaniel, S. R. , & Chalip, L. (2002). Effects of commercialism and nationalism on enjoyment of an event telecast: Lessons from the Atlanta Olympics. European Sport Management Quarterly, 2(1), pp. 3-22. *McDaniel, S. R. (2003). Reconsidering the relationship between sensation seeking and preferences for viewing televised sports. Journal of Sport Management, 17(1), pp. 14-37. *McDaniel, S. R. , & Zuckerman, M. (2003). Impulsive sensation seeking and interest and participation in gambling activities. Personality and Individual Differences, 35(6), pp. 1385-1400. *Vizcaino, S.A., Mason, D.S., & McDaniel, S. R. (2005). Online auctions of sports trading cards: Does information asymmetry affect final bid prices? International Journal of Sport Management, 6(2), pp. 99-121. *McDaniel, S. R. , Lim, C., & Mahan, J. (2007). The Role of personality in response to ads using violent images to promote consumption of sports entertainment. Journal of Business Research, 60, pp. 606-612. Chapters in Books: *McDaniel, S. R. (2004). Sensation Seeking and Consumption of Televised Sports. Chapter 18 in Shrum, L. J. (Ed.), Blurring the Lines Between Entertainment and Persuasion: The Psychology of Entertainment Media. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, pp. 323-335. *McDaniel, S. R., Mason, D., & Kinney, L. (2004). Spectator Sport's Strange Bedfellows: The Commercial Sponsorship of Sporting Events to Promote Alcohol, Tobacco and Lotteries. Chapter 14 in T. Slack (Ed.), Commercialization of Sport. London: London: Routledge, pp. 287-306. *Kinney, L. & *McDaniel, S. R. (2004). American Consumer Attitudes toward Corporate Sponsorship of Sporting Events. Chapter 10 in Kahle, L. & C. Riley (Eds.), Sports Marketing and the Psychology of Marketing Communication. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, pp. 211-222. *Mahan, J. E. & *McDaniel, S. R. (2006). The New Online Arena: Sport, Marketing, and Media Converge in Cyberspace. Chapter 25 in Raney, A. & J. Bryant (Eds.), Handbook of Sports and Media. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, pp. 409-431.

Building: School of Public Health

Biography

James J. McDevitt received his Masters Degree in Industrial Hygiene and PhD in Environmental Health Sciences from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, Maryland and completed a 3 year post-doctoral fellowship in Environmental Health Sciences at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, Massachusetts. He is diplomat of the American Board of Industrial Hygiene. He has over 20 years of experience practicing industrial hygiene as an active duty member of the United States Air Force and in private consulting. He is currently an adjunct professor at the University, Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health and Visiting Professor at the Harvard School of Public Health. 

Dr. McDevitt has used a combination of micro/molecular biology techniques, principles of aerosol physics, and understanding of air sampling methodology for research on infectious disease transmission and intervention. Much of his research activity has centered on developing novel methods for the assessment of microbial aerosols using molecular and microbiology techniques. Much of the technology in the field of molecular biology was developed in clinical settings and requires adaptation for meaningful analysis of environmental samples. There are methodological issues which are unique to the assessment of aerosols including those relating to sensitivity, sample volumes and sample matrix inhibitors. Dr. McDevitt uses a combination of laboratory-based aerosol generating test chambers and field studies to validate the reliability of newly developed methods. He has used aerosol-measuring expertise to study inactivation of aerosolized microorganisms. These studies were performed using both bench-top and room-sized aerosol test chambers to elucidate the factors influencing the inactivation of viruses and bacteria by: ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI), heat, relative humidity, and chemical disinfectants. 

Dr. McDevitt also studied airborne transmission of respiratory viruses. There is a lack of consensus regarding whether airborne infections, such as those caused by influenza viruses, are transmitted via condensation nuclei or by larger droplets. Source characterization of exhaled breath particle number and size is critical for understanding the spread of airborne infection as well as for determining appropriate interventions. Dr. McDevitt was part of the team which developed a novel system for collecting and characterizing virus aerosols in the breath of human subjects infected with influenza virus. This data was used to characterize exhaled breath aerosols with respect to particle size and number, as well as to evaluate the efficacy of masks in preventing the release of virus aerosols from infected persons. This same technology is used as part of aircraft cabin environmental research to evaluate airborne infection transmission on aircraft. The findings will provide quantitative starting points such as particle size, particle number, and infective half-life, for the use in computation fluid dynamic models of infectious particle transmission and personal exposure on aircraft. 

Dr. McDevitt, as part of the Harvard Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology, is evaluating the effectiveness of Engineered Water Nanostructures (EWNS) as a means to control the spread of infectious disease in the air, in food, and surfaces. EWNS are produced by electrospraying of water vapor and are 25 nm in diameter, remain airborne in indoor conditions for hours, contain Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and have very strong surface charge (on average 10e/structure). This experimentation is primarily accomplished through the use of test chamber studies using biological test organisms and varying environmental parameters. 

Courses

MIEH 600

Meaghan McHugh
Faculty Research Assistant, UMD Prevention Research Center
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 0228
Phone: (301) 405-7983 |
Biography

Meaghan is a PhD student with a Masters in Public Health from Johns Hopkins University and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Economics from the College of the Holy Cross. Prior to beginning her doctoral degree, Meaghan worked with university centers for excellence in neurodevelopmental and related disabilities (with an emphasis on children with autism spectrum disorders and youth who are deaf and hard of hearing). Before working in the area of children and youth with special health care needs, Meaghan worked on tobacco control and prevention with Special Olympics International and the Montgomery County Department of Health and Human Services. Her research interests include adolescent health from a life course perspective with a focus on substance abuse prevention through effective health communication. Meaghan is currently a Faculty Research Assistant at the School of Public Health’s Prevention Research Center (UMD-PRC) working on community-based participatory research.

Education and Training

Masters in Public Health,  Johns Hopkins University

Bachelor of Arts degree in Economics,  College of the Holy Cross

Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health

Lecturer, Health Services Administration
Chief, Materials Management and Environmental Services at Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health

Adjunct Associate Professor, Family Science
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 1142 School of Public Health
Phone: 301.405.3672 |
Office Hours: 

Contact via email to set up a time unless otherwise listed in Course Syllabus.

CV / Resume
PDF icon MendolaCV2012.pdf
Education and Training

Ph.D., Epidemiology and Community Health, State University of New York at Buffalo, 1994 M.S., Epidemiology, Social & Preventive Medicine, State University of New York at Buffalo, 1990

Honors and Awards

Academic Appointments 2003: Adjunct Associate Professor, Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 1998: Adjunct Assistant Professor, Social & Preventive Medicine, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 1996: Assistant Professor (Tenure Track), Social & Preventive Medicine, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 1994: Research Instructor, Social & Preventive Medicine, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY Honors 2006. Bronze Medal. US EPA, ORD Honor Award. Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Program Support Team, for their outstanding contributions and expert advice to the Office of Water on the State 2 Disinfection Byproducts Rule.

Funded Research Projects

National Children's Study, North Carolina cohort. Principal Investigator. NIH/CDC/EPA cooperative funding. 2005-2007, total direct costs $1,400,000. 

Reproductive health effects of drinking water haloacetic acid exposure. Principal Investigator. 2004-2007, total direct costs $150,000.

Publications: 

Mendola, P., Messer, L.C., & Rappazzo, K. (2008). Review IV: Science linking environmental contaminant exposures with fertility and reproductive health impacts in the adult female.Fertil and Steril online supplement, 89:e81-394.

Kimmel, C.A., Selevan, S.G., Mendola, P., & Kimmel, G.L. (In press). Children's environmental health: Critical windows of development and susceptibility. In B. Sonawane & R. Brown (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Environmental Health. Elsevier Ltd., Oxford, UK.

Shirley Micallef
Assistant Professor (Plant Science & Landscape Architecture), Joint Appointment Center for Food Safety and Security Systems (CFS3), Applied Environmental Health (MIAEH)
Affiliate in MIAEH
Campus: UMD | Building: 2126 Plant Sciences Building
Phone: 301-405-2497 |
Biography

Dr. Micallef is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture. Her main interests include the microbial ecology of bacteria in soil and how microorganisms interact with plants. Her current research is focusing on food safety of fruits and vegetables, specifically looking at Salmonella on pre-harvest tomatoes and using bacterial models to investigate possible means of contamination of crops with human pathogens residing in the environment.

Education and Training

Ph.D., Microbial Ecology, University of Massachusetts- Boston M.Sc., Plant Biology, University of Malta B.Sc., Biology and Chemistry, University of Malta

Courses

PLSC 115 How Safe is Your Salad? The Microbiological Safety of Fresh Produce PLSC 489 Microbiology of Agricultural Systems

Affiliate Professor, Center for Health Equity
Associate Professor, Counseling Psychology; CoPE
Other Affiliations: UMD - Not within SPH, Center for Health Equity
Campus: UMD | Building: Benjamin Building | Room: 3214
Phone: (301) 405-8446 |
Website: 
http://www.education.umd.edu/Academics/Faculty/Bios/index.cfm?URLID=mmille27
Assistant Professor, Kinesiology
Campus: UMD | Building: School of Public Health | Room: 2134A
Phone: (301) 405-2495 |
CV / Resume
PDF icon cv_latex.pdf