The National Consortium for Multicultural Education for Health Professionals organizes annual meetings with the purpose to address health disparities by integrating cross-cultural education into health professional training. These annual meetings provide an opportunity for experts in cultural competency and health literacy curriculum development and research to network, identify common competencies, approaches and assessment methods that can be applied to education and research in cultural competency for multiple health professions, and advance research and publication potential of the combined fields of cultural competency and health literacy.


2013

Strategies to Ameliorate the Effect of Bias and Stereotyping on Health Outcomes at the 8th National Conference on Quality Health Care for Culturally Diverse Populations

March 2013, Oakland, CA

Research has shown that bias, stereotyping, prejudice, and clinical uncertainty on the part of healthcare providers may contribute to racial and ethnic disparities in health care. During this workshop session organized by Dr. Carter-Pokras, researchers from various sectors of the healthcare field were invited to discuss lessons learned from the limited research on strategies that may prevent bias and stereotyping in clinical practice or ameliorate its effects on health outcomes. The discussion focused on four major topics: the Implicit Association Test and results among medical students lead by Cayla Teal; physician implicit bias and prediction of treatment decisions lead by Alexander Green; health literacy and the provider/system role in improving communication and reducing bias by Jonathan VanGeest and a conceptual research framework on implicit social cognition and intergroup bias by Irene Blair.

PRESENTATIONS

  • A conceptual research framework on implicit social cognition and intergroup bias by Irene Blair
  • The Implicit Association Test and results among medical students by Cayla Teal
  • Physician implicit bias and prediction of treatment decisions by Alexander Green

Health literacy and the provider/system role in improving communication and reducing bias by Jonathan VanGeest


2011

Let’s Talk: Health Literacy and Cultural Competency Researchers Working Together at the 3rd Health Literacy Annual Research Conference

October 2011, Chicago, IL

During the 3rd Health Literacy Annual Research Conference held in Chicago, Illinois; The National Consortium for Multicultural Education for Health Professionals sponsored two new funded activities, a scientific panel discussion and a professional development workshop.  Dr. Carter-Pokras and Dr. Braun coordinated the scientific panel Let’s Talk: Health Literacy and Cultural Competency Researchers Working Together.  This panel concentrated on the connections between health literacy and cultural competency learning objectives and research questions; the development of a conceptual framework for conducting research on the impact of cultural competency education on patient outcomes; discussion of lessons learned by researchers engaged in cultural competency and health literacy curriculum development; and incorporation of health literacy in CLAS standards and what that means for future practice and research.

The Affordable Care Act calls for model curricula in cultural competency to be disseminated through an Internet Clearinghouse. Model curricula have been disseminated for several years through the Association of American Medical Colleges’s MedEdPortal, a free, online, searchable peer-reviewed publication service and repository for medical and oral health teaching materials, assessment tools, and faculty development resources (www.aamc.org/mededportal). The only resource that focuses exclusively on the continuum of medical education (UGME, GME, CME), MEP provides resources for faculty development to meet unique needs of educators. In an effort to support the growth and development of curricula in cultural competency through the Association of Ameican Medical College’s MedEDPortal, health care professionals in health literacy, health care communication, cultural competency and health disparities curriculum development were invited to participate in the MedEdPortal Skills Workshop to engage in preparation of educational materials and expand their awareness of opportunities and success with publicizing peer-reviewed scholarly educational materials.

As a result of the valuable input from the participants of this event and the research of Dr. Desiree Lie, Dr. Carter-Pokras, Dr. Bonnie Braun and Dr. Cliff Coleman, the article What Do Health Literacy and Cultural Competence Have in Common? Calling for Collaborative Health Professional Pedagogy was published on October 2012 with the goal to continue supporting the joint progress of cultural competency and health literacy in the health care field.

 


2010

7TH National Conference on Quality Health Care for Culturally Diverse Populations

October 2010, Baltimore MD

During the 7th National Conference on Quality Health Care for Culturally Diverse Populations, the University of Maryland collaborated by organizing and leading an interactive workshop addressing inter-professional education to improve communication between patients, families and providers; organizing an interview session on perspectives on implementing successful health promoter programs serving the Maryland Latino population; participating in the presentation “Teaching cultural diversity: current status in U.K., U.S., and Canadian medical schools – meeting the common challenges” part of the cultural competence training: “What Should it Be and How it Should be Taught?” and presenting a poster on Health Literacy: What Does it Have to do with Cultural Competency?