May 16, 2017

Three School of Public Health graduates have been awarded Fulbright Scholarships for the 2017-2018 academic year. 

Theresa Kim, Ph.D. ’17 (Health Services Administration) has been awarded a Fulbright for research in Senegal on family planning and the influence of health care workers on the adoption of long acting reversible contraception (LARCs). Dr. Kim feels honored that her work was chosen, and that "the State Department has respect for the work I do," despite the current administration's expansion of the gag rule affecting U.S. foreign aid for family planning efforts. "I think people in government still value evidence-based research."

Sana Haider, BS ’16 (Community Health) has received a Fulbright Student Award based on her proposal: “Large-scale Introduction of HPV Vaccination Among Underprivileged Elementary School Girls”. Ms. Haider will enroll as a non-degree seeking student in the University of Philippines Manila’s College of Public Health.  Her research will explore the perspectives of stakeholders on a previously implemented school based HPV vaccination program. Ms Haider aims to present her findings to the Philippine Department of Health.  Faculty from the University of Philippines Manila College of Public Health and Philippine General Hospital will supervise Ms. Haider. She hopes to return to the US upon completion of her research for an MPH specializing in epidemiology and later a Doctorate of Public Health.

Shelly Spence, B.S. ’11 (Kinesiology), has been awarded a Fulbright Teaching Assistantship to Thailand. Ms. Spence received a Master of Arts in Teaching at Chaminade University and currently is an English Language Arts teacher at Sacred Hearts Academy in Honolulu. She is also a veteran of the United States Navy and was one of the first female rescue swimmers. In addition to her teaching responsibilities in Thailand, Ms. Spence plans to use her skills as a coach and physical education teacher to create extra-curricular activities that would help her students learn leadership, accountability, and gain self-esteem. Coaching would also give her additional opportunities to build a positive rapport with both students and their families. Upon her return to the U.S., she plans to pursue a Doctor of Education in Technology Integration in K-16 Education at John Hopkins University. She hopes to learn how she can incorporate the latest technology into the classroom in ways that will encourage critical thinking.

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Theresa Kim