Woman doing yoga on mountain and river landscape
Tuesday, February 26, 2:00 pm - 3:45 pm
Location: 
6137 McKeldin Library Special Events Room University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742
Researchers at UMD are actively engaged in providing new and exciting insights into the aging process and how people can deal with its effects. Join the University of Maryland Emeritus/Emerita Association (UMEEA) and our panelists for a stimulating and informative program as we discuss:
 
  • The effects of aging and hearing loss on the ability to understand speech in complex environments;
  • How exercise affects brain function and memory in healthy older adults at genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and
  •  Human-computer interaction and health informatics, including ways that technologies designed for health and well-being position and support individuals as we age.
This event is open to University of Maryland faculty, staff, students, and their guests. Please add guests in your RSVP. Light refreshments will be provided.
 
 
 
Featured Panelists:
 
Samira Anderson, Associate Professor, Hearing and Speech Sciences
Anderson’s lab investigates the effects of aging and hearing loss on the ability to understand speech in complex environments. Hearing aids or cochlear implants cannot compensate for the imprecise neural speech encoding that results from increasing slowness in processing stimuli as we age, perhaps exacerbated by deficits in memory and attention. Her research considers other rehabilitative approaches that focus on the use of auditory and/or cognitive training to improve speech understanding. Her lab’s research should lead to better methods of identifying and managing hearing difficulties in older adults.
 
Amanda Lazar, Assistant Professor, College of Information Studies
Lazar’s research interests are in human-computer interaction and health informatics. She investigates the ways that technologies designed for health and well-being position and support individuals as we age.
 
J. Carson Smith, Associate Professor, Kinesiology
Can exercise protect against age-related cognitive decline? Smith explores how exercise and physical activity affect human brain function and mental health. He and his research team examine especially how exercise affects brain function and memory in healthy older adults at genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease, as well as in those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). He is also interested in how physical activity might alter emotional reactivity, attention, and cognitive function among patients with anxiety and/or depressive mood disorders.
 
Moderator:
 
Arthur N. Popper, Professor Emeritus, Department of Biology; former Associate Dean, the Graduate School; former chair, University Senate
 
Event Type: 
Guest Speakers, UMD Events