HAPPY Lab Team
Director: 
Office Phone Number: 
301-405-9053
Email: 
jichen@umd.edu

The aim of this lab is to study system-level care coordination among hospitals, communities, and public health agencies that can improve population mental health and reduce health disparities. Our group uses interdisciplinary approaches and involves collaboration with clinical leaders, community partners, and organizational decision makers.

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Our team is led by Dr. Jie Chen, PhD, an associate professor in the Department of Health Services Administration at the School of Public Health, University of Maryland at College Park. Dr. Chen has more than ten years of research experience developing, refining, and applying analytical methods to evaluate the impact of health policy and the health care delivery system on population health outcomes.

Our Project Team

Jie Chen, PhD, is an associate professor in the Department of Health Services Administration at the School of Public Health, University of Maryland at College Park. Dr. Chen’s research fields include (1) health care disparities; (2) health care delivery system and policy; (3) behavioral health; and (4) economic evaluation.  Her research seeks to inform the organization and allocation of health care resources to improve health care access. Most recently she has conducted research on patient-centered medical homes, including designing personalized patient activation and empowerment strategies to encourage and sustain patients’ involvement in their treatment. Her research on behavioral health focuses on the integration of health care organizations to promote behavioral health of vulnerable populations. Dr. Chen is also interested to study the impact of health policy initiatives and changing economic conditions on health care access, utilization, and health disparities. An additional field of her research involves economic evaluation, including cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analysis of community intervention and state/federal policies. Dr. Chen has more than fifteen years of research experience developing, refining, and applying analytical methods to evaluate the impact of health policy and the health care delivery system on population health outcomes.
David Marcozzi, MD, MHS-CL, FACEP, a Fellow of the American College of Emergency Physicians, Dr. David Marcozzi is an Associate Professor and the Director of Population Health within the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. He also serves as a Co-Director of the Program in Health Disparities and Population Health in the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, and is the Assistant Chief Medical Officer for Acute Care at the University of Maryland Medical Center. Prior to these roles, Dr. Marcozzi served in the federal government as a senior leader and subject matter expert on health delivery, emergency care, and emergency preparedness.
Michel Boudreaux, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Services Administration in the School of Public Health, University of Maryland. Dr. Boudreaux conducts research in interrelated areas of health policy. He is especially interested in publicly financed health programs for low-income populations and how they affect the evolution of health, human capital and socioeconomic position across the life-course. He also maintains an active research agenda focused on improving the quality and usability of health insurance measures collected in federal surveys. His work has appeared in Health Affairs, Health Services Research, Journal of Health Economics, Medical Care, Medical Care Research and Review, and other outlets. He received a PhD (2014) in Health Services Research, Policy, and Administration from the University of Minnesota.
Howard H. Goldman, MD, PhD, is Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Dr. Goldman received joint M.D. - M.P.H. degrees from Harvard University in 1974 and a Ph.D. in social policy research from the Heller School at Brandeis University in 1978. He is a mental health services researcher, currently active in studies on the organization and financing of mental health services. He is the author or co-author of 325 publications in the professional literature. From 2004 – 2016 Dr. Goldman was the editor of Psychiatric Services, a mental health services research and policy journal published monthly by the American Psychiatric Association. He has been on the editorial boards of several other journals, including the American Journal of Psychiatry, Health Affairs, and the Journal of Mental Health Policy and Economics. Dr. Goldman directed the MacArthur Foundation Network on Mental Health Policy Research for a decade ending in 2009. He served as the Senior Scientific Editor of the Surgeon General's Report on Mental Health from 1997-1999 for which he was awarded the Surgeon General’s Medallion. During 2002 and 2003 Dr.Goldman was a consultant to the President’s New Freedom Commission on Mental Health. In 1996 he was elected to membership in the National Academy of Social Insurance, and in 2002 he was elected to the Institute of Medicine. Since 2009 he has chaired a standing committee of the National Academy of Science, Engineering, and Medicine providing advice on medical disability to the Social Security Administration.
Luisa Franzini, PhD, is Professor and Chair of the Health Services Administration Department, School of Public Health, University of Maryland, College Park.  Her research interests focus on health care costs, health policy innovations in Maryland, and health disparities. During the last 20 years, a major component of Fr. Franzini’s research and teaching activities has focused on the application of economics and econometrics to investigating the causes and consequences of disparities in health and health care delivery in vulnerable populations. She brings extensive experience in cost and cost-effectiveness analysis and a commitment to improving healthcare access and quality for vulnerable populations, including chronically ill patients and high-risk children on Medicaid. Her research on health disparities addresses the pathways through which socioeconomic disparities affect health, including trust, cultural factors, religion, policies to reduce disparities, healthcare disparities, and disparities in parenting and academic achievement.
Stephen B. Thomas, PhD, is the Principal Investigator on the Center of Excellence in Race, Ethnicity and Health Disparities Research, funded by the National Institute for Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD). Dr. Thomas has received numerous awards and for his professional accomplishments, and over the years, his work has become recognized as one of the scholarly contributions leading to the 1997 Presidential Apology to Survivors of the Syphilis Study Done at Tuskegee.  His current research focuses on the translation of evidence-based science on chronic disease into community-based interventions designed to eliminate racial and ethnic disparities in health and health care. More specifically, he has focused on understanding how social context shapes attitudes and behaviors of underserved, poorly served, and never-served segments of our society toward participation in health promotion and disease prevention activities. Dr. Thomas is particularly interested in how the legacy of the Syphilis Study at Tuskegee (1932–72) has impacted trust and influenced the willingness of African Americans to participate in medical and public health research.
Susan Racine Passmore, PhD, is Assistant Research Professor with the Department of Health Services and the Maryland Center for Health Equity.  Dr. Passmore is a medical anthropologist with much experience in qualitative data collection and analysis on a range of health disparities.  She has worked extensively with vulnerable populations including Latinos, African Americans and immigrant groups.  Through the Center for Health Equity, Dr. Passmore has served as Project Director on several NIH grants for the Maryland Center for Health Equity (M-CHE), School of Public Health, University of Maryland.   These include “Building Trust between Minorities and Researchers” (7RC2MD004766, Quinn and Thomas Joint PI); Research Center for Excellence in Minority Health Disparities (RCEMHD) (PG60MD000207, Thomas & Quinn  Joint PI); and the Center of Excellence on Race, Ethnicity, and Health Disparities Research (P20MD006737, Thomas & Quinn  Joint PI). Prior to joining the University of Maryland, College Park Dr. Passmore's work includes research on  breast cancer, COPD, colorectal cancer and eye health working with faculty at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, School of Medicine. She has also worked to understand the needs of aging populations along the US/Mexican border in a previous position with the University of Texas at El Paso.
Charles F. Reynolds III, MD, is the Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry (emeritus) at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and, in addition, serves as Editor-in- Chief of the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. Prior to July 2017, Dr. Reynolds served as the UPMC Endowed Professor in Geriatric Psychiatry, Professor of Behavioral and Community Health Sciences at the Pitt Graduate School of Public Health, Director of the Aging Institute of the UPMC and University of Pittsburgh, the NIMH-sponsored Center of Excellence in the Prevention and Treatment of Late Life Mood Disorders, and the John A. Hartford Center of Excellence in Geriatric Psychiatry. Dr. Reynolds is internationally renowned in the field of geriatric psychiatry. His primary research interests focus on mood, grief, and sleep disorders of later life, with a particular focus on mental health services in primary care, improving treatment strategies, depression prevention, and promotion of brain health in older adults. Dr. Reynolds was the 2016 recipient of the Pardes Humanitarian Prize in Mental Health awarded by the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation for his groundbreaking contributions to the prevention and treatment of depression in older adults. Also in 2016, Dr. Reynolds was elected to the Association of American Physicians for his pioneering work as a physician-scientist in geriatric psychiatry and the prevention and treatment of late-life depression.
Min Qi Wang, PhD, is a professor in the Department of Behavioral and Community Health, School of Public Health (SPH), the University of Maryland at College Park (UMD).  He has authored and co-authored on over 240 publications in referred journals.  Dr. Wang has obtained over 90 grants over his career. He has extensive experience in applying information technology to public health, which has been his focus for the past 15 years. Currently, he the UMD PI to develop the Maryland Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (EPHTN).
Deanna Barath, MPH, is a doctoral student in the University of Maryland’s Health Services Administration program. Her interests are in increasing health equity for vulnerable populations through community- and evidence-based interventions and policy. She is part of the second cohort of Health Policy Research Scholars, a program led by  George Washington University with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Most recently, Deanna served as the project coordinator for a rural health community assessment in Maryland, researched veteran health insurance choices, and worked on research linking local health promotion activities to readmission rates. Before choosing to continue her education, Deanna worked at the Florida Department of Health overseeing department-wide efforts related to quality improvement, policy development and improved integration, particularly for endeavors to improve the health of children, provided guidance to local health departments on the “Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnerships” process, and the state’s integrate approach to accreditation. She also worked on Florida State University’s Masters in Public Health Program accreditation, which is where her affinity for performance management began, and lead the team that propelled the tobacco-free campus policy into fruition. Deanna received her Master of Public Health and Bachelors in Exercise Science from Florida State University, achieved a Six Sigma Green Belt certification from the Florida Sterling Council, and is a trained facilitator.
Ivy Benjenk, RN, MPH, is a first year PhD student in the Department of Health Services at the School of Public Health, University of Maryland at College Park. Prior to beginning the PhD program, Ms. Benjenk worked as a quality improvement professional at the George Washington University Hospital in Washington D.C. and Lutheran Medical Center in Brooklyn, New York. Prior to that, she worked as an inpatient psychiatric nurse at McLean Hospital in Massachusetts and Binghamton General Hospital in upstate New York. Ms. Benjenk is currently a clinical instructor of psychiatric nursing at the George Washington University. Her research interests are in hospital-based quality improvement and patient safety with a specific focus on inpatient psychiatric care. 
asdfAitalohi (Aita) Amaize, MPH, BSN, RN, CEN, SANE-A, is a PhD student in the Department of Health Services Administration at University of Maryland-College Park's School of Public Health. Her research interests are in health service delivery systems and utilization / access specifically in vulnerable populations that face challenges related to social determinants of health. Other areas of interest are coordination of care, care transitions, use of technology to enhance care management across the care continuum, primary care (particularly health centers), workforce issues (particularly nursing and lay professionals), behavioral health integration, population health, and health system transformation. Prior to joining the HAPPY Lab, Aita worked as the RN Clinical Program Manager for the Transition of Care Program at Unity Health Care, Inc., Washington DC's largest Federally-Qualified Health Center. In that position, she led a multi-disciplinary team of Registered Nurses, Community Health Workers, and Case Managers to implement an intensive care management program targeting high hospital utilizers. In 2017, she was part of the National Council for Behavioral Health's Addressing Health Disparities Leadership Program, and was awarded a UMD All-S.T.A.R. fellowship for her work on a rural health assessment of Mid-Shore Maryland communities. She is a former emergency department and forensic nurse with a passion for bettering the conditions of underserved and hypermarginalized populations. She has worked with under-insured women in New York City, homeless persons in Boston, children in The Philippines, and survivors of sexual and intimate-partner violence in D.C. She holds a BA in Psychology from Princeton University (with certificates in Neuroscience and African-American Studies) and an MPH from The Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health (with certificates in Health Communications and Health Disparities). She received her BSN from The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing as a second-degree NURSE Corps and New Careers in Nursing (NCIN) scholar. 
 
 
 

 

Effect of Hospital and Community Care Coordination on Health Care Access, Quality, and Equity among Individuals with Risk Factors or Diagnosis of ADRD
1R56AG062315-01 (Chen, PI)  
09/30/2018-06/30/2020
Sponsor: NIH-National Institute of Aging
Role: Principal Investigator

The objective of this project is to determine the best hospital-community care coordination practices that can improve the effective management of  Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia (ADRD)  and co-existing conditions; control/reduce modifiable risk factors of ADRD and administer health care for these diseases in early stages, and eventually promote population health and reduce health disparities.

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Effects of Hospital-Community-Public Health Integration on Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Mental Health
R01MD011523 (Chen, PI) 
07/12/2017-2/28/2022
Sponsor: NIH- National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities
Role: Principal Investigator

The objective of the project is to examine the current state of the extent and variation in integrated care coordination between hospitals, communities, and public health agencies (hospital-community-public health) among African American and Latino patients with mental illness and how these coordination practices impact racial and ethnic disparities in health.

If you are interested in additional information, please check Project SMILE.

System-level Multidisciplinary Integration for popuLation health and Equity (SMILE)

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Effect of Local Health Departments on Health Care Disparities for Individuals with Mental Health Disorders

R21MH106813-01 (Chen, PI)
01/01/2016-12/31/2018
Sponsor: NIH-National Institute of Mental Health
Role: Principal Investigator

The objective of this exploratory study is to identify effective local health department activities (i.e., service provisions and health promotion) that reduce racial and ethnic disparities in health care among individuals with mental disorders, including those with mental disorders and coexisting chronic diseases.

If you are interested in additional information, please check Project LHD. 

Local Health Departments and Mental Health Care Disparities (LHD)

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PATient-centered Involvement in Evaluating the effectiveNess of TreatmentS (PATIENTS)
5R24HS022135-02 (Mullins, PI; Chen, Pilot PI)
09/30/2015- 09/29/2018
Pilot Project: Personalized Strategies to Activate and Empower Patients in Health and Health Care
Sponsor: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
Role: Principal Investigator

This study proposes a patient-centered multi-level activation and empowerment framework, and a mixed method study design (secondary data analysis using the existing national representative data sets, and the qualitative interviews) to achieve three specific aims:1) to assess how patient activation and empowerment varies by the characteristics of patients, physicians, communities, and the health care system; 2) to identify effective strategies to activate and empower patients with different characteristics, such as demographic and social economic status, health conditions, and cultural backgrounds; 3) to elicit barriers to activate and empower patients through focus group interviews with diverse patients, physicians, and local health department representatives.

If you are interested in additional information, please check Project PAES.

Patient Activation and Empowerment Strategies (PAES)

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Impact of Payment Reform on Racial Disparities in Hospital Psychiatric Care
5R01MD010255-03 (Slade, PI)
03/1/2017-2/28/2018
Role: Co-Investigator

Health Matters: Navigating an Enhanced Rural Health Model for Maryland, Lessons Learned from the Mid-Shore Counties 
(Franzini, PI)
08/2016-10/2017
Sponsor: Maryland Health Care Commission
Role: Co-Investigator

Can Tailored Text Messages Reduce Cardiometabolic Risk among Health Disparity Populations?
University of Maryland, Tier 1 seed grant (Passmore, PI)
2017-2018
Role: Co-Investigator

Prince George’s County Health Enterprise Zone Capitol Heights 20743
(Carter, PI)
07/01/2013 – 06/30/2017
Sponsor: Maryland Department of Health & Mental Hygiene and the Community Health Resources Commission
Role: Co-Investigator

System-level Multidisciplinary Integration for popuLation health and Equity (SMILE)

Mental illness is a major public health concern in the U.S. and a significant source of morbidity and mortality. Racial and ethnic minority patients experience disproportionate burdens of common physical health conditions associated with mental illness, largely due to the lack of health care access and social stigma. Effectively treating mental illness and the associated conditions will depend on a comprehensive approach that crosses health systems and policies, such as the Community Benefit State Laws, to target “Population Health” and emphasize the value of social determinants of health. However, the current mental health care system works in a silo, and evidence of care coordination on health disparities is lacking.

The objective of the project is to examine the current state of the extent and variation in integrated care coordination between hospitals, communities, and public health agencies (hospital-community- public health) among African American and Latino patients with mental illness and how these coordination practices impact racial and ethnic disparities in health.

Aim 1: Determine the effects of Community Benefit State Laws on racial and ethnic disparities in health care access, quality, and costs among people with mental illness.

Aim 2: Identify variations in hospital-based adoption of care coordination practices (medical services and community partnerships) and their correlation with patient and community level socio-demographics, local public health resources, and the extent of community benefit law implementation.

Aim 3: Determine the impact of care coordination practices between hospitals, communities, and public health agencies on racial and ethnic disparities in health care and health outcomes for people with mental illness.

Local Health Departments and Mental Health Care Disparities (LHD)

Evidence demonstrates the cost effectiveness of improving health care for patients with coexisting MHDs and other diseases through the integration of individual and organizational factors, yet there remains a gap in our knowledge about how to best accomplish the integration of Local Health Departments (LHDs) with the communities they serve. The objective of this study is to identify effective LHD activities that reduce racial and ethnic disparities in health care for individuals with MHDs, including those with MHDs and coexisting chronic diseases. Our central hypothesis is that LHDs’ service provision and health promotion can reduce disparities. Specifically, we assess the effect of LHD activities on health care for individuals with MHDs, and the effect of LHD activities on racial and ethnic disparities (African American vs. White; Latino vs. White) in mental health care. Given that MHDs are common comorbidities of major chronic diseases, we will assess the effect of LHD activities on racial and ethnic disparities in general health care for individuals with coexisting MHDs and other chronic diseases, such as diabetes and heart disease.

Results of this exploratory study will generate substantial amounts of new evidence and insights about how to utilize LHDs’ resources to integrate the care for individuals with MHDs, and to what extent the resources of LHDs can be used, or should be expanded, to improve mental health.

Media Report: Maryland Study Shows Local Health Departments’ Efforts to Improve Mental Health Can Prevent Costly Hospitalizations

Analytical Framework

Notes: LHDs: Local Health Departments. The model is adapted from social ecological model (McLeroy et al. 1988, Stokols 1996), and the CDC Public Health Action Plan 2011.
Chen J, Bloodworth R, Novak P, Cook B, Howard G, Rendall M, Thomas S, and Reynolds C. Reducing Preventable Hospitalization and Disparity: Association with LHD Mental Health Promotion Activities. American Journal of Preventive Medicine. In Press.

Patient Activation and Empowerment Strategies (PAES)

Under the ongoing health care reform, activating and empowering patients in their own health and health care has become a priority for policy makers to improve the efficiency and quality of the health care delivery system. Evidence on effectiveness of patient activation and empowerment interventions, however, is limited. The long-term goal of this subproject is to develop culturally designed personalized interventions to activate and empower patients in their own health and health care. PCOR can only be optimized or truly patient-centered if the core of the research, patients, can actively participate in the treatments and take responsibilities for their own health. Designing culturally-sensitive personalized interventions will be critical to sustaining patients’ involvement in their treatment, develop patients’ abilities to manage their health, help patients to express concerns and preferences of the treatment, empower patients to ask questions about treatment options, and build up strategic patient-physician partnership through shared decision making. This research project is designed to provide a comprehensive assessment of patient activation and empowerment strategies (PAES) for diverse patient populations, including racial and ethnic minorities. It provides direct evidence for our further research, i.e., developing personalized PAES. To achieve this, we propose a patient-centered multi-level activation and empowerment framework. Based on this framework, we will carry out quantitative secondary data analysis and focus group interviews to achieve three specific aims:

Aim 1: To assess how patient activation and empowerment varies by patients’ characteristics (age, gender, race/ethnicity, immigrant status, chronic diseases, or other health conditions), physician-patient relationship (communication, physician patient language concordance, trust), community characteristics (social support, neighborhood, local health department) and the health care system (health care access, insurance).

Aim 2: To identify effective PAES for patients with different characteristics, such as demographic and social economic status, health conditions, and cultural backgrounds. We are particularly interested in identifying and quantifying strategies that can activate and empower patients with culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds and strategies that can reduce health disparities among different racial and ethnic groups.

Aim 3: To elicit barriers of activating and empowering patients via focus group interviews with diverse patient groups, physicians, and local health department representatives.

Analytical Framework

Chen J, Mullins D, Novak P, Thomas S. Personalized Strategies to Activate and Empower Patients in Health Care and Reduce Health Disparities. Health Education & Behavior 2016; 43(1): 25-34.

Team Members:
Liz Jansky and Jennifer Huang
Senior Study Directors
CRSS Work Assignment Lead
Westat
1600 Research Blvd. WB428 | Rockville, MD 20850

Health care system and coordination

Chen J, DuGoff E, Novak P*, Wang M. Adoption of Care Coordination Strategies and Innovative Delivery Models among US Hospitals. Health Care Management Review. In Press.

Bloodworth R*, Chen J, Mortensen K. Effect of Medicaid Cost-Sharing Policy and Medicaid Expansion Status on Preventive Care Use. Preventive Medicine. In Press.

Benjenk I*, Chen J. Variation of Follow-Up Rate after Psychiatric Hospitalization by Hospital Characteristics and Social Determinants of Health. The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. In Press.

Benjenk I*, Chen J. Finding Disparities in the Stars: Using the Nursing Home Five-Star Quality Rating System to Identify Disparities in Nursing Home Quality for Older Adults with Severe Mental Illness. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. In Press.

Novak P*, Chen J. Subsyndromal Depression among People Aged 85+ Linked to Higher Monthly Healthcare Spending. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. In Press.

Benjenk I*, Chen J. Effective Mental Health Interventions to Reduce Hospital Readmission Rates: A Systematic Review. Journal of Hospital Management and Health Policy. In Press.

Novak P*, Andrew A*, Chen J. Changes in Health Insurance Coverage and Barriers to Health Care Access among Individuals with Serious Psychological Distress following the Affordable Care Act. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research. In Press.

Novak P*, Bloodworth R*, Green K, Chen J. Strengthening the Public Health Impact: Local Health Departments Activities to Reduce Emergency Visits for Substance Use Disorders. Journal of Health Care Quality. In Press.

Chen J, Novak P*, Goldman H. Public Health System Delivered Mental Health Preventive Care Links to Significant Reduction of Health Care Costs. Population Health Management. In Press.

Chen J, Bloodworth R, Novak P, Cook B, Howard G, Rendall M, Thomas S, and Reynolds C. Reducing Preventable Hospitalization and Disparity: Association with LHD Mental Health Promotion Activities. American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2018;54(1):103-112.

Chen J, Novak P*, Barath D*, Goldman H, Mortenson K. Local Health Departments' Promotion of Mental Health Care and Reductions in 30-Day All-Cause Readmission Rates in Maryland. Medical Care. 2018;56(2):153-161.

Nair S, Chen J. Improving Quality of Care in Federally Qualified Health Centers through Ambulatory Care Accreditation. Journal for Healthcare Quality. In Press.

Chen J. Evaluating the Cost of Mental Illness: A Call for Cost-Effective Care Coordination Model. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 2016; 25: 142-143.

Chen J, Mullins D, Novak P, Thomas S. Personalized Strategies to Activate and Empower Patients in Health Care and Reduce Health Disparities. Health Education & Behavior 2016; 43(1): 25-34.

Chen J. Mortensen K, Bloodworth R. Exploring Contextual Factors and Patient Activation: Evidence from a Nationally Representative Sample of Patients with Depression. Health Education & Behavior 2014; 41(6):614-624.

Mortensen K, Perman C, Chen J. Innovative Payment Mechanisms in Maryland Hospitals: An Empirical Analysis of Readmissions under Total Patient Revenue. Health Care: The Journal of Delivery Science and Innovation 2014; 2(3):177-183.

Health disparities

Bustamante A, McKenna R, Ortega A, Chen J. The Role of Legal Status in Explaining Access to Care Differences between Mexican and Non-Mexican Latinos after the ACA Implementation. Health Affairs. Published online 1 September 2018.

Bustamante A, Chen J, McKenna R, Ortega A. Health Insurance Coverage and Access to Care for Immigrants in the U.S. after the Implementation of the Affordable Care Act. Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health. 2018 Apr 9. 

Kemmick J, Chen J, Alcalá H, Langellier B, McKenna R, Roby D, Ortega A. Insurance Coverage and Utilization Improve for Latino Youth but Disparities by Heritage Group Persist Following the ACA. Medical Care. 2018;56(11):927-933.

Hu T, Mortensen K, Chen J. Medicaid Managed Care in Florida and Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Preventable Emergency Department Visits. Medical Care. 2018.

Chen J, Vargas-Bustamante A, Novak P. Reducing Young Adults’ Health Care Spending through the ACA Expansion of Dependents’ Coverage. Health Services Research 2017; 52(5): 1835-1857.

Novak P*, Williams K*, Chen J. Racial and Ethnic Disparities among the Remaining Uninsured Young Adults after The ACA Expansion of Dependent Coverage. Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities 2017; 4(4): 607-614.

Chen J, Vargas-Bustamante A, Tom S. Health Care Spending and Utilization by Race/Ethnicity under the Affordable Care Act’s Dependent Coverage Expansion. American Journal of Public Health 2015; 105:S499-507.

Chen J, Vargas-Bustamante A, Mortensen K, Ortega A. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care Access and Utilization under the Affordable Care Act. Medical Care 2016; 54(2):140-146.

Ali M, Chen J, Mutter R, Novak P, Mortensen K. The ACA's Dependent Coverage Expansion and Out- of-Pocket Spending by Young Adults with Behavioral Health Conditions. Psychiatric Services 2016; 67(9):977-982

Mortensen K, Chen J. The Great Recession and Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Services Utilization. JAMA Internal Medicine 2013; 173(4): 315-317.

Mental health disparities

Novak P, Chen J. Antidepressant Use and Costs among Low Education and Low-Income People with Serious Psychological Distress in 2014- Evidence from the Health Care Reform. Journal of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research 2017;8(3):159-167.

Cook BL, Zuvekas SH, Chen J, Progovac A, Lincoln AK. Assessing the Individual, Neighborhood, and Policy Predictors of Disparities in Mental Health Care. Medical Care Research and Review 2017;74(4): 404-430.

Chen J, Dagher R. Gender and Race/Ethnicity Differences in Mental Health Care Use during the Great Recession 2007-2009. Journal of Behavioral Health Services and Research 2016; 43(2):187-199.

Chen J, Rizzo J.  Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Antidepressant Drug Use. Journal of Mental Health Policy and Economics 2008; 11:155-165.

Chen J, Rizzo J.  Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Psychotherapy Services-- Evidence from U.S. National Survey Data. Psychiatric Services 2010; 61: 364-372.

Data analysis and methods

Anderson A*, Akre E*, Chen J. Exploring National Trends of Patient and Family Centered Care among US Children. Journal of Child Health Care. 2018 Jan.

Rodriguez H, Chen J, Edusei K, Suh A, Bekemeier B.  Local Public Health System Influences on the Incidence of Sexually Transmitted Diseases.  American Journal of Public Health 2012; 9 (102): 1773–1781.

King C, Chen J, Dagher R, Holt C, Thomas S. Decomposing Differences in Medical Care Access among Cancer Survivors by Race and Ethnicity. American Journal of Medical Quality 2015; 30(5):459- 469.

Chen J, O’Brien M, Mennis J, Alos V, Grande D, Roby DH, Ortega AN. Latino Population Growth and Hospital Uncompensated Care Cost. American Journal of Public Health 2015; 105:1710-1717.

Ammerman R, Chen J, Mallow P, Rizzo J, Folger A, Van Ginkel J. Burden of Illness Study of Depressed “At Risk” Mothers Using the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Journal of Affective Disorders 2016; 190:386-394.

 

Recent News & Events

  • Deanna Barath has been selected to receive the AcademyHealth travel award and has also been selected to participate in the AcademyHealth Diversity Scholars Network
    • The AcademyHealth Diversity Scholars Network provides travel and registration support for five scholars to attend the Annual Research Meeting (ARM), pre-ARM Methods Workshops, and an Interest Group (IG) Pre-Conference Session of the scholar's choice. The goal of the Network is to support the professional development of underrepresented racial/ethnic minority groups in the field of health services research (HSR).
  • Deanna Barath will be honored by the School of Public Health and Delta Omega Gamma Zeta for her poster "Health Matters: Where do Mid-Shore Residents Go For Care?"
    • The honor will be extended on May 14th, 2018 at the School of Public Health's Delta Omega Gamma Zeta Reception from 3:00 - 4:30 pm. Her poster has also been nominated for the national 2018 Delta Omega poster session.
  • Priscilla Novak has advanced as a semi-finalist for The Data Incubator's Data Science Fellowship. Fewer than one in four candidates make it to this stage.
    • The Data Incubator's Data Science Fellowship is an intensive 8-week fellowship that prepares the best scientists and engineers with advanced degrees to work as data scientists and quants. It identifies Fellows who already have the 90% difficult-to-learn skills and equips them with the last 10%: the tools and technology stack that make them self-sufficient, productive contributors. 
  • Dr. Eric Slade to give the seminar at the University of Maryland's School of Public Health, May 3rd, 2018 at 12 PM in the Friedgen Student Lounge
    • Dr. Eric Slade serves as the Director of the Division of Psychiatric Services Research in the Department of Psychiatry and as Associate Professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. He will be joining JHK in the fall. Most of this research has focused on empirically evaluating the impacts of mental health care policies, programs, and services.  He currently directs two NIH-funded research studies of Maryland’s 2014 hospital payment reform and its effects on psychiatric care practices, health outcomes, and health care costs.
  • Publication: Subsyndromal Depression among people Aged 85+ Linked to Higher Monthly Healthcare Spending, April 2018
  • Publication: Local Health Departments' Promotion of Mental Health Care and Reductions in 30-Day All-Cause Readmission Rates in Maryland, April 2018
  • Deanna Barath and Priscilla Novak win poster awards for their work at Public Health Research Day @ Maryland, April 2018
  • Project SMILE: Seminar on Mental Health Care, April 2nd, 2018
    • Dr. Jie Chen will be hosting a seminar on Project SMILE (System-level Multidisciplinary Integration for popuLation health and Equity). The objective of the project is to examine the current state of the extent and variation in integrated care coordination between hospitals, communities, and public health agencies among African American and Latino patients with mental illness and how these coordination practices impact racial and ethnic disparities in health.
  • Publication: Local Health Departments Prevent Hospitalizations, March 2018
  • Dr. Jie Chen will give a seminar on Integrating Public Health in Mental Health Care – Evidence on Readmission, Preventable Hospitalization, and Health Disparity for the Washington State Hospital Association Safe Table Webinar on March 6, 2018
  • Dr. Karoline Mortensen to visit University of Maryland's School of Public Health, March 2nd, 2018
    • Dr. Mortensen is an Associate Professor of Health Sector Management and Policy at the University of Miami School of Business. Her research interests include health insurance, access, and health care utilization of vulnerable populations, particularly the utilization of Medicaid enrollees and the uninsured; assessing impacts of the Affordable Care Act; and innovative payment mechanisms in Maryland hospitals.
  • Project LHD Publication: Local Health Departments' Promotion of Mental Health Care and Reductions in 30-Day All-Cause Readmission Rates in Maryland, February 2018
  • Project LHD Publication: Reducing Preventable Hospitalization and Disparity: Association With Local Health Department Mental Health Promotion Activities, January 2018

Please feel free to reach out if you have any questions or would like to explore a potential collaboration

 

Jie Chen
University of Maryland School of Public Health
4200 Valley Dr #2242, College Park, MD 20742
Room: 3310E
Phone: (301) 405-9053
Email: jichen@umd.edu