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Water Quality, Outreach and Wellness (WOW) Laboratory

Researching Water: Its Quality, Perceptions and Behaviors

Water Quality, Outreach, and Wellness (WOW) Lab of the School of Public Health at the University of Maryland

The WOW lab conducts interdisciplinary research around water - analyzing microbial water quality, the most effective ways to communicate about water quality, and the perceptions and behaviors related to water use. In addition, the WOW lab is exploring the beneficial impacts of urban agriculture and gardening on health and wellness.

Department: Applied Environmental Health (MIAEH)
Room Number: 2234
Director: Rachel Rosenberg Goldstein 

Office Phone Number: (301) 314-1588
Email: rerosenb@umd.edu
 

The WOW lab conducts interdisciplinary research around water - analyzing microbial water quality, the most effective ways to communicate about water quality, and the perceptions and behaviors related to water use. In addition, the WOW lab is exploring the beneficial impacts of urban agriculture and gardening on health and wellness.

We would love you to join us in our exciting research and outreach projects! Please contact Dr. Goldstein at rerosenb@umd.edu if you are an undergraduate, graduate student, or postdoc interested in opportunities.

Water Quality, Outreach, and Wellness (WOW) Lab of the School of Public Health at the University of Maryland
Rachel Rosenberg Goldstein, faculty member of the School of Public Health at the University of Maryland
Esha and Taeilorae work in the bio-safety hood, transferring bacterial colonies from one type of agar plate to another.
Mya and Emily monitor the heating plate during DNA extraction.
RRIPER (Rooftop Runoff Irrigation Produce Eaten Raw)
RRIPER (Rooftop Runoff Irrigation Produce Eaten Raw) of the School of Public Health at the University of Maryland

The RRIPER (Rooftop Runoff Irrigation Produce Eaten Raw) program led by Dr. Rachel E. Rosenberg Goldstein in the Maryland Institute of Applied Environmental Health, School of Public Health, University of Maryland seeks to evaluate the quality of harvested rainwater and rooftop runoff used to irrigate produce. Using alternative water sources is increasingly important as we face a global water crisis. It is crucial that every drop of water be used wisely, including water that falls as rain or runs off our roofs. Despite the abundance of rainwater barrels in use in Maryland, gardeners have previously been advised against using harvested rainwater or rooftop runoff to irrigate gardens because of water quality and food safety concerns. However, studies on the microbial and chemical quality of harvested rainwater or rooftop runoff are limited and contradictory.

During the summers of 2018 and 2019, the RRIPER program analyzed rooftop runoff, soil, and produce grown with rooftop runoff for bacterial indicators (total coliforms and E. coli), pathogens (Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes), and heavy metals (aluminum, cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc) in vegetable raised garden beds using a subsurface irrigation system supplied by rooftop runoff in Frederick, Maryland. While the water quality data of the garden beds at the coalition is still being analyzed, prior research has shown that community gardens with stormwater management systems can increase community wellbeing and protect environmental resources (Tom et al., 2013). The Frederick garden site has shown social benefits of harvesting stormwater runoff, including community engagement and improved access to fresh produce. More detailed information on the Frederick raised vegetable garden beds can be found in the University of Maryland Extension fact sheet “Watering Seeds of Change with Rainwater”. We plan to continue our work to evaluate multiple types of rainwater and rooftop runoff harvesting systems to assess their safety for irrigating fresh produce.

Principal Investigator:                                 
Rachel E. Rosenberg Goldstein, PhD, MPH

Collaborators:
Claire Hudson
Leena Malayil
Suhana Chattopadhyay
Sarah Allard
Manan Sharma
Amy Sapkota
Drew Ferrier
Marcus Williams
Kelsey Brooks
Andy Lazur
Jon Traunfeld
Neith Little

Project Sponsors:
U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture through CONSERVE: A Center of Excellence at the Nexus of Sustainable Water Reuse, Food & Health;
University of Maryland, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources Strategic Initiative Implementation Team: Optimize Urban Environments Through Design, Green Technology and Community Engagement

CONSERVE

CONSERVE members of the School of Public Health at the University of Maryland

CONSERVE (COordinating NontraditionalSustainable watER Use in Variable climatEs): A Center of Excellence at the Nexus of Sustainable Water Reuse, Food, and Health’s mission is to facilitate the adoption of transformative on‐farm treatment solutions that enable the safe use of nontraditional irrigation water on food crops. Climate change and population growth are stressing our freshwater resources, requiring the exploration of alternative water sources, including reclaimed water (highly treated municipal wastewater). Finding reliable, safe irrigation water is especially important for farmers as agriculture is the largest water user worldwide and in the US. For water reuse in agriculture to be a viable option, buy-in from farmers is crucial.
As the co-Project Director of Extension for CONSERVE, Dr. Goldstein led a multi-region needs assessment survey among farmers on nontraditional water use opinions and communicated research results to growers, local and state regulators, and other interested parties through multimedia outreach and educational materials as well as through in-person workshops and community events. The CONSERVE Extension team is increasing understanding and acceptance of water reuse in agriculture among non-agricultural communities through outreach and education activities.

Principal Investigator: 
Amy R. Sapkota, PhD, MPH

Co-Project Director of Extension: 
Rachel E. Rosenberg Goldstein, PhD, MPH

Project Sponsors:
U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture

Moving Beyond the “Yuck Factor”: Measuring brain responses to water reuse terms and determining if natural environmental images change responses

Water reuse (the beneficial use of reclaimed water) is becoming increasingly necessary as climate change and population growth stress freshwater resources. While government agencies, scientists, and the water industry have recognized the importance of water reuse, a commonly cited barrier is consumers’ negative perceptions - the ‘yuck factor’. There is an urgent need to determine how to increase public acceptance of water reuse. Education could be instrumental for changing perceptions, but to date there has been a lack of outcome studies on the effectiveness of water reuse education.
This study’s goal is to improve acceptability of water reuse by determining if educational videos modulate perceptions of water reuse terms. We are measuring changes in neural activity in response to multiple categories of water reuse terms pre- and post-exposure to water reuse education videos using electroencephalogram (EEG). The results from this study can validate and increase the effectiveness of water reuse education materials using objective neurocognitive measures. The integration of psychology into water resource educational efforts will aid targeted education campaigns which will impact communication, acceptance, and policy.

Principal Investigators:
Rachel E. Rosenberg Goldstein, PhD, MPH
Edward Bernat, PhD

Project Sponsor:
Brain and Behavior Initiative (BBI) at the University of Maryland (UMD)

RANG (Reducing Anxiety with Nature and Gardening) 
Gardening & Health Survey

The COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic and resulting stay-at-home orders have resulted in increased levels of anxiety and stress. There have been several news articles written about the increase in seed sales and the benefits of gardening, however there have been limited scientific studies about if gardening and reduced anxiety are significantly associated. We have developed a survey to determine the increase in gardening during the COVID-19 pandemic and if gardening is associated with reduced stress and anxiety. The results of this survey will be used by University of Maryland Extension (UME) educators in addressing and directing future educational programming and resource development for existing and beginning gardeners.

This survey is open to all individuals who are at least 18 years old and located in the United States.  It is estimated that the survey will take 10 minutes or less to complete. The survey is anonymous and does not contain questions that may personally identify you. Please complete the survey only once. The survey will be open until June 1, 2021. Thank you for helping us identify ways to reduce stress and provide gardening information.

Principal Investigator:
Rachel E. Rosenberg Goldstein, PhD, MPH

Collaborators:
Marcus Williams
Naomi Sachs, PhD
Jennifer D. Roberts, Dr.PH, MPH

Healthy Garden, Healthy You

Mental health and food insecurity are two of the greatest public health challenges facing our nation.  Gardening is a means to provide nutritious food, and a growing body of literature has identified the mental health benefits of gardening, including mood improvement, reduced anxiety, and trauma recovery.  Racial and ethnic minority communities, including those in local Prince George's County and Baltimore City, MD are disproportionately impacted by poverty, mental health problems, and limited access to healthy food.  Through this project we will create virtual toolkits, host a webinar, and develop fact sheets to share information with local, underserved urban communities about the mental and physical health benefits of gardening.  Urban gardening will be further promoted by teaching community members how to start their own urban gardens and equipping them with garden starter kits. 

Principal Investigator:
Rachel E. Rosenberg Goldstein, PhD, MPH

Co-Principal Investigator:
Jon Traunfeld, M.Agr.

Student Collaborators:
Emmie Healey, PhD Student
Cameron Smith, MS Student

Project Sponsor:
Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM)

Rachel Rosenberg Goldstein smiles for a headshot.

Dr. Rachel Goldstein is the director of the Water Quality, Outreach and Wellness (WOW) Lab.  Her research focuses on the microbiological quality of recycled water (specifically reclaimed wastewater and roof-harvested rainwater) and the produce and soil it irrigates, the mental health benefits associated with gardening and being outdoors, and how to best communicate issues related to water reuse.  She is a project co-director for CONSERVE: A Center of Excellence at the Nexus of Sustainable Water Use, Food & Health and an Assistant Professor in the University of Maryland's Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health (MIAEH) where she teaches several graduate-level courses in addition to mentoring undergraduate research students.  Dr. Goldstein received her PhD in Toxicology and Environmental Health and MPH in Environmental Health Sciences from the University of Maryland after completing her B.A. in Environmental Studies from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

Emmie Heal

Emily (Emmie) Healey
ehealey@terpmail.umd.edu

Emmie Healey is a doctoral student in the Environmental Health Sciences program at the
University of Maryland School of Public Health, Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental
Health (MIAEH). She received her BS in Environmental Science and her BA in Studio Art from
the University of Maryland, College Park. She earned her master’s degree in Marine
Biosciences from the University of Delaware. Emmie is interested in the microbial communities
growing in reclaimed water and on irrigated food.

Cameron Smith smiles, sitting on rocks with a field of cacti behind her.

Cameron Smith is a first year MS student in the Maryland Institute of Applied Environmental Health at the University of Maryland School of Public Health. She received her BS in Environmental Science and Technology: Ecosystem Health and certificate in Sustainable Agriculture from the University of Maryland. Her research interests relate to agriculture, one health, water quality and access to clean drinking water, and contaminants found in drinking water that pose human health concern.

Taeilorae

Taeilorae Levell-Young
MPH, Public Health Practice and Policy Student
Lover of applied environmental health has a specific interest in: lead, water, and agriculture globally. Howard University Alum and for fun: I dance, hike, camp, fish, and am a Resin Wall Art Artist.

Esha Saxen smiles at the camera with a beautiful view of trees and blue skies behind her.

Esha Saxena is a sophomore Neuroscience major on the pre-med track. She is part of the Global Public Health Scholars program in school, which first piqued her interest in public health. Working in the WOW Lab has provided her with an avenue to explore this interest and immerse herself in multiple relevant projects!

Mya smiles at the camera while standing in front of a christmas tree with sparkling lights.

Mya Smith is a Neurobiology and Physiology major looking to enter the field of community or global health.

Emily smiles for a headshot.

Emily Speierman is pursuing a BS in Civil & Environmental Engineering at UMD.  She joined the WOW Lab during the summer of 2021 when Dr. Goldstein was her mentor for the CONSERVE/DAWN internship program.  She has specific interests in on-site wastewater treatment systems, the crossover between water treatment and public health, and how to improve the flow of information between scientists/researchers and communities in need.